It's good I mostly play originals

yoreel

Strat-Talk Member
Jul 12, 2012
69
UK
I have never learned covers easily and am still not good at it. I practice them but the part where you memorize the complete song such that it can be trotted out in a performnce eludes me. I need to be better at this.

Ideas?
Surely learning originals is the same process? Keep going through it til you get it right.
 

Gpete247

Strat-Talk Member
Feb 14, 2021
32
Leicestershire England
We had a rhythm guitarist who did a lot solo gigs and played folk stuff. He always said of a new song "Piece of p**s, C, F & G"". When I tried to follow him it was C, F & G. Then he would turn away and stick in a few other chords and no-one knew what he was doing except him. He would do this at paid gigs and make me and the bass player look like idiots.
 

drp146

Strat-Talker
Gold Supporting Member
Jun 8, 2020
401
Oklahoma
Yes. I can manage that especially if the drummer is good. I also do ok with playing my originals with the band or solo.

Right now I just need a good hour of covers to do acoustic guy who sings. It would not be life changing but I could make some cash while having fun.
I find that writing out the lyrics, or typing them out on the computer helps me remember them. For the chords, I just play the song every day till it's committed to memory. Some are easier than others.
 

Bill Johnson

Strat-Talk Member
Sep 6, 2014
16
Grove City Ohio
Satisfaction by the Stones does not fit that rule. Neither does a lot of stuff Green Day. Zeppelin. Etc. And even most of the Beatles songs were 2 stanzas a chorus. A Lead. Then third stanza. then chorus repeated and then a repeated stanza to close with. And the rest of their songs fit this pattern perhaps without the lead
This was your post ?
 

stratblast

Strat-O-Master
Jan 17, 2015
576
OMAHA, NEBRASKA
We had a rhythm guitarist who did a lot solo gigs and played folk stuff. He always said of a new song "Piece of p**s, C, F & G"". When I tried to follow him it was C, F & G. Then he would turn away and stick in a few other chords and no-one knew what he was doing except him. He would do this at paid gigs and make me and the bass player look like idiots.
I have found on the average. C F G. To be country and folk chords. And. A E. D. Traditionally to be rock and soul chords. I don’t know why that is. Of course there are always exceptions to that ideology B ? Well I guess that can be ilused when the composer is not sure where to go with the song.
 

stratblast

Strat-O-Master
Jan 17, 2015
576
OMAHA, NEBRASKA
We had a rhythm guitarist who did a lot solo gigs and played folk stuff. He always said of a new song "Piece of p**s, C, F & G"". When I tried to follow him it was C, F & G. Then he would turn away and stick in a few other chords and no-one knew what he was doing except him. He would do this at paid gigs and make me and the bass player look like idiots.
We had a player like that as well. So what did I and the bass player do ? We did not try to follow the chord progression. The bass player would just start doing some bass runs around what he was hearing. And I started throwing in various a arpeggio’s And lead runs. What really broke the guitar player of that habit is when I started throwing some bluesy slide guitar into his hard rock improvs. The crowd thought it was something we had practiced. So 2 problems solved. The guitarist stopped doing this and the crowd was not annoyed.
 

stratblast

Strat-O-Master
Jan 17, 2015
576
OMAHA, NEBRASKA
We had a rhythm guitarist who did a lot solo gigs and played folk stuff. He always said of a new song "Piece of p**s, C, F & G"". When I tried to follow him it was C, F & G. Then he would turn away and stick in a few other chords and no-one knew what he was doing except him. He would do this at paid gigs and make me and the bass player look like idiots.
The biggest issue was not what happened at our gigs. But at rehearsals. Many times the guitarist would break off into these different jams. And we’d spend valuable rehearsal time just trying to prove who was the better musician…, the guitarist would start a progression. I would do my thing the bass player would do his. Then the guy that started it would get upset cuz we did not do the same for him. And allow him to do some lead jams. Sorry …..but I was Not at rehearsal to work on jams…. especially when we had gigs around the corner we needed to get ready for.
Maybe it was because we rehearsed at the other guitarist’s house. ? That he liked to jam ? I don’t know.
 

Quikstyl

Strat-Talker
Nov 10, 2018
219
California
Who needs cassettes or cds or albums when you have internet.? All music is on YouTube for free nowadays. There may be some ads to sit thru now and then. But who cares about that ?
I'm talking 30+ years ago. But watching somebody play it on YouTube doesn't develop the ear. That's why a lot of what's played is wrong.
 

stratblast

Strat-O-Master
Jan 17, 2015
576
OMAHA, NEBRASKA
I'm talking 30+ years ago. But watching somebody play it on YouTube doesn't develop the ear. That's why a lot of what's played is wrong.
I was Not refering to watching someone playing the song on you tube... I believe I said listening to it..... Learning for me is harder to watch the person playing it.. than picking it out of the audio...so I would suggest.. you find the song you wish to learn... then find the video.. of the STUDIO version... NEVER the Live version.. too much improvisation... and if you can find the studio version.. where the words come up on the screen that can be helpful. for timing and breaks etc.. but Not necessary..... just mainly find a song you wish on youtube..... where you can listen to the .. the song.. and at a touch of a button.. go forward or backwards a few secs.. to replay parts quickly or to jump ahead.. and if need be..use the setting button... that's the button that looks like a cog ....right below the youtube screen .the audio.. can be slowed to .25 .50... .75 of it's original speed... with the pitch or chord sound remaining the same only sustained longer since it's slower.... playing by ear just tsakes practice....honestly when I had never really done it that much at the start of my playing me and another guy were trying to learn the same song... something really easy.. to me now.. but.. he picked it up after only listening to the song once or twice.. and I told myself if he can do it I can..
you will be able to as well.. it just takes practice... the more you do it... sooner or later you can listen to a song on your car radio,,.. and know what chords are being played... I have done this a lot.... these days... by the time I get home I already know how the song goes just by listening to it in the car,..
You can get there as well/...practice listening over and over...
 

stratblast

Strat-O-Master
Jan 17, 2015
576
OMAHA, NEBRASKA
I'm talking 30+ years ago. But watching somebody play it on YouTube doesn't develop the ear. That's why a lot of what's played is wrong.
and you are correct...a lot of so called musicians on you tube videos.. DO play or teach the song wrong.. or incorrectly..
it is always best to go to the original artist for the song.. and listen how it is played...NEVER thru instructors.... first mistake..
ALWAYS.. ONLY listen to the Artist's rendition directly...
 

FPWTC

Strat-Talker
Mar 24, 2017
303
london
I have never learned covers easily and am still not good at it. I practice them but the part where you memorize the complete song such that it can be trotted out in a performnce eludes me. I need to be better at this.

Ideas?

I think learning tracks by breaking them down into smaller parts helps a lot. A lot depends on how quickly you need to learn tracks by, some people do manage to pick up songs very quickly, but if you have some time to practice a set then take a tune and learn the verse well then move onto the bridge etc.

One useful thing learning music theory taught me is many tunes have the same chord structures, so once you learn the underlying similarities in many songs it is often pretty easy to learn another song, although you may need to learn it in another key. The reason guitar is quite easy is you can simply shift up a chord pattern you learnt up or down the neck or use a capo to move the same shapes to a new key.

It is worth Googling about common chord progressions and which songs share them. You will be surprised at how many are similar.

I would also suggest that if you struggle remembering a tune then it is best to focus on simpler songs at first and maybe the rhythm parts rather than solos. The more you practice retaining a song the more your brain will learn how to remember if that makes sense!

One method I use is to go through a song as I am drifting off to sleep. The brain is an amazing organ and I have found giving it a problem to work on while asleep often helped me remember tunes. It may not work for everyone but it did for me:)
 


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