It's pretty cool when you start hearing things you didn't hear before...

Wound_Up

You can call me Duane 😁
Jan 23, 2020
4,731
NW LA
No, I'm not hallucinating! :p I'm talking about when your "ear" gets more refined, for a lack of a better explanation. For example:

When I bought the Seymour Duncan '59 Model humbucker earlier this year and installed it, I couldn't really hear a difference between it and the stock pickup. Today, the differences are glaringly obvious.

2nd example and why I posted this thread... When I first got my Silvertones in my avatar, I couldn't ever tell a difference in sound between each pickup/combo of pickups except for the bridge. Positions 2 & 4 sounded just like 3(mid) & 5(neck).

Fast forward to today and I can actually hear a difference. And I like positions 2 & 4. They definitely have a sound of their own. A sound I quite like. On a similar note, I've also come to the realization that the Silvertone guitar I paid $40 for is actually a damn good guitar. Much better than the other Silvertone I have that I bought new at full price.


Yes, I realize most of you figured all of this out centuries ago :D lol(jk) But I'm still pretty new to this so I'm still picking up on all this stuff.


Anyway. That's all I've got. Thanks for letting me share! ;) :thumb:
 

mad axe man

Senior Stratmaster
Jul 23, 2016
3,783
ontario canada
No, I'm not hallucinating! :p I'm talking about when your "ear" gets more refined, for a lack of a better explanation. For example:

When I bought the Seymour Duncan '59 Model humbucker earlier this year and installed it, I couldn't really hear a difference between it and the stock pickup. Today, the differences are glaringly obvious.

2nd example and why I posted this thread... When I first got my Silvertones in my avatar, I couldn't ever tell a difference in sound between each pickup/combo of pickups except for the bridge. Positions 2 & 4 sounded just like 3(mid) & 5(neck).

Fast forward to today and I can actually hear a difference. And I like positions 2 & 4. They definitely have a sound of their own. A sound I quite like. On a similar note, I've also come to the realization that the Silvertone guitar I paid $40 for is actually a damn good guitar. Much better than the other Silvertone I have that I bought new at full price.


Yes, I realize most of you figured all of this out centuries ago :D lol(jk) But I'm still pretty new to this so I'm still picking up on all this stuff.


Anyway. That's all I've got. Thanks for letting me share! ;) :thumb:
wanna hear more? get a celestion gold or a emincece red fang alnico you'll hear everything
 

Bob Spumoni

Senior Stratmaster
May 5, 2019
1,899
New England
This post is on the money. Learning to hear is a lifelong journey, like every other aspect of music, or anything else worth a d--n.

I love '59's as well.
 

Textele

Senior Stratmaster
Silver Member
Oct 10, 2009
4,905
Texas
Did you change amps in this revelation? Not saying your ears didn't get better, I'm sure they did.

Some of the modeling amps tend to make everything sound the same.

A great amp will reveal everything. Good and bad. And it doesn't have to be a tube amp.

It baffles me how great Boss Katana's sound when dialed in. I keep a 100 watt combo in one of my ensembles practice space.
 

dante1963

Senior Stratmaster
Silver Member
Apr 28, 2016
2,011
St. Louis
Interesting post.

Makes you wonder how many mods people make that aren’t needed. Myself included.

Sometimes just moving an amp a few inches in another direction makes it sound different.

What I found interesting is that WHERE I stand in the room related to my amp makes a huge difference. I play a JTM45 through a 2x12 cab loaded with Celestion Golds. (And a good attenuator to keep me from being blasted across the room by the monster.)

When I stand right in front of it, it sounds great. But, when I go off to the side of the room--like 10 feet and 45 degrees away from the front of the cab--it sounds amazing. The distance and not being directly in front of the speakers seems to open up the sound a lot. It just sort of blooms. I find that really interesting. That the tone of an amp sounds different depending on where you are in relationship to it.

That might be pretty basic knowledge, but I am just an unfrozen caveman, and this modern world puzzles me sometimes. :)
 

Wound_Up

You can call me Duane 😁
Jan 23, 2020
4,731
NW LA
Did you change amps in this revelation? Not saying your ears didn't get better, I'm sure they did.

Some of the modeling amps tend to make everything sound the same.

A great amp will reveal everything. Good and bad. And it doesn't have to be a tube amp.

It baffles me how great Boss Katana's sound when dialed in. I keep a 100 watt combo in one of my ensembles practice space.

No, no changing amps. All through the same 15w tube combo from Monoprice. I do have a a Mustang II that I still use somewhat, but it wasn't considered in this realization. This is all through the 2 EL84s and 3 12ax7s and the Celestion Seventy/80 or whatever it's called in the Monoprice/Stage Right 15 watter.
 

Textele

Senior Stratmaster
Silver Member
Oct 10, 2009
4,905
Texas
When I stand right in front of it, it sounds great. But, when I go off to the side of the room--like 10 feet and 45 degrees away from the front of the cab--it sounds amazing. The distance and not being directly in front of the speakers seems to open up the sound a lot. It just sort of blooms.

Also, that is some of the qualities of a really nice rig.

JTM45! :thumb:
 

Wound_Up

You can call me Duane 😁
Jan 23, 2020
4,731
NW LA
What I found interesting is that WHERE I stand in the room related to my amp makes a huge difference. I play a JTM45 through a 2x12 cab loaded with Celestion Golds. (And a good attenuator to keep me from being blasted across the room by the monster.)

When I stand right in front of it, it sounds great. But, when I go off to the side of the room--like 10 feet and 45 degrees away from the front of the cab--it sounds amazing. The distance and not being directly in front of the speakers seems to open up the sound a lot. It just sort of blooms. I find that really interesting. That the tone of an amp sounds different depending on where you are in relationship to it.

That might be pretty basic knowledge, but I am just an unfrozen caveman, and this modern world puzzles me sometimes. :)

That your Firebird in your avatar? What pickups? I came across an Epiphone Reverse Firebird a couple of days ago that looked amazing! I'd love to have one. Maybe I ought to pass on the guitar I'm buying next and keep saving for a reverse Firebird. Hmmmm.

Playing that one in your avatar through a JTM45 would be heavenly :thumb:
 

dante1963

Senior Stratmaster
Silver Member
Apr 28, 2016
2,011
St. Louis
That your Firebird in your avatar? What pickups? I came across an Epiphone Reverse Firebird a couple of days ago that looked amazing! I'd love to have one. Maybe I ought to pass on the guitar I'm buying next and keep saving for a reverse Firebird. Hmmmm.

Playing that one in your avatar through a JTM45 would be heavenly :thumb:


It is, and it is hands down my favorite guitar. The upper fret access is wonderful. It’s just super fun to play.

Mine (a 2016) had the ceramic pickups in it that Gibson was using at the time. They were a touch hot for my tastes so I swapped them out for a set of Mojotone Johnny Winter pickups. I love those. They are closer to the original FB pickups. Bright but not too bright, no noise, sounds good clean or dirty. I like them a lot.

Here is a more recent pic:

746F8849-B814-435C-A9C4-992FB9688BC7.jpeg
 

Triple Jim

Guy Who Likes to Play Guitar
Silver Member
Feb 27, 2018
8,281
North Carolina
A friend from out of town visited for a few days earlier this week. He has always liked singing when friends get together and jam. Since he was coming here he was interested in jamming, but I told him I didn't have anyone lined up to jam besides me. Having an entry level bass and a small bass amp I said "Maybe it's time you learned to play bass." He liked that idea enough to try mine, and the next day he went to Guitar Center and bought a Squier starter kit. We fooled around together with him on bass and me on guitar for the next couple nights. By the time he left he was watching YouTube beginner bass lessons and getting into it.

The interesting thing is that he also started noticing the bass in music he listens to, whereas up 'til now he had never even known how to pay attention to it. So yes, ears can certainly be trained!
 
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amstratnut

Peace thru Music.
Dec 1, 2009
21,755
My house.
What I found interesting is that WHERE I stand in the room related to my amp makes a huge difference. I play a JTM45 through a 2x12 cab loaded with Celestion Golds. (And a good attenuator to keep me from being blasted across the room by the monster.)

When I stand right in front of it, it sounds great. But, when I go off to the side of the room--like 10 feet and 45 degrees away from the front of the cab--it sounds amazing. The distance and not being directly in front of the speakers seems to open up the sound a lot. It just sort of blooms. I find that really interesting. That the tone of an amp sounds different depending on where you are in relationship to it.

That might be pretty basic knowledge, but I am just an unfrozen caveman, and this modern world puzzles me sometimes. :)
Open or closed back?

Keep in mind, nomatter how it sounds to you, how it sound to the audience is what counts.
 

Dadocaster

Dr. Stratster
Mar 15, 2015
28,185
Sachse TX behind the cemetary
Well, you could slice their ears off with too much high end or, bury the vocals. Who cares? I do. I want the audience to have the best possible experience.

My reading of the OP was that this thread was about "testing" and trying to gauge very fine detail of guitar tone. My comment could have probably been more complete if I had said: "The audience doesn't care of the very fine gradations of various qualities of guitar tone." I stand behind that statement.
 

eclecticsynergy

Senior Stratmaster
Sep 23, 2014
4,261
NY
Familiarity can certainly help us find aspects of our tone we didn't hear before.

For me, it's not just details of articulation & dynamics and subtle qualities of voicing, but textures of gain and different characters of cleanup. And things like how the same pickup can sound, behave, and feel very different in two different guitars.

There's no doubt that focus and training improves awareness in just about any of our senses.
Perception improves with practice - not because the sense organs are changed physically, but because developing better focus has improved our processing of the same sensory information.

With practice, ordinary people can learn to notice more details about things they see, or appreciate qualities they never knew in the flavor profile of wines and food.

I dated a chef for a while; her palate was incredibly refined. She could tell if a cookie had allspice rather than cinnamon & clove. And she'd make comments like, "If they'd used a little less marjoram in this soup, the leeks would've had more depth."

She knew if milk had been in plastic containers just by tasting it, while I had to try an actual side by side comparison before I could notice the difference. (Ever since then I buy milk in cardboard cartons.)

Anyway, qualities I was unaware of were obvious to her. And it wasn't that she simply had a sensitive tongue. Training let her perceive aspects the rest of us don't. I learned a lot.

In the same way, a mastering engineer listening to a mix hears five different flavors of bass, where most of us just hear hard bass or loose bass. Some might only hear bass and treble...

It's true much of the audience won't notice the details we musicians obsess about with our gear.
Some would argue that makes those subtleties unimportant, even irrelevant.

But what we hear affects how we play.
I think, for many of us, tone inspires.

And inspiration might make a difference even non-musicians can notice.
 


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