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Just curious...your top three GT player influences

Discussion in 'Sidewinders Bar & Grille' started by Deafsoundguy, Mar 24, 2020.

  1. davidKOS

    davidKOS still at home Strat-Talk Supporter

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    here are some guitar players on the list that did NOT influence me (at least that I am conscious of), some because of my taste and some because of my age group, even though some are quite good players:

    SRV
    Jimmie Vaughan
    James Hetfield
    Billy Gibbons
    David Gilmour
    Angus Young
    Mike Campbell
    John Mayer
    John Frusciante
    Mark Knopfler
    George Lynch
    Dave Mustaine
    Ace Frehley
    Kirk Hammett
    Dave Murray
    Mark Tremonti
    Billy Corgan
    Robin Finck
    Jerry Garcia
     
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  2. Agtronic

    Agtronic Strat-Talker

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    Specifically speaking to what sound marked me from the very beginning, I would have to say:

    Jimi Hendrix: I was 6 years old when I first heard "Johnny B Goode" on vinyl, from the "Hendrix in the West" album. The sound of the guitar captured me like nothing else. It still has the same effect on me today. The overtones, the screaming tones when the wah is engaged, the feedback etc... it was just the coolest thing I ever heard. I wanted to play guitar after hearing that. And I started playing at age 7. The intro to Johnny B Goode was one of the first things I learned to play.

    Eric Clapton: About the same time, my father bought our first CD player in ~1987, and he got a few CDs. One of them was a compilation of "The Cream of Eric Clapton". The guitar sound on the intro of Layla, that chugging power chord part. I was instantly smitten. Then there was the buttery tone on Sunshine of your Love, with its muffled PAFs and power tube breakup overlayed on top, it was just so rich sounding to me. I didn't know why at the time, but I realized those tones were very different from each other, and I became fascinated with that. I learned later that the former was single coils on a Strat and the latter a PAF-equipped Gibson. Sunshine was the absolute very first song I learned to play on the guitar at age 7.

    SRV: For many years after discovering the above guitarists, I listened to a lot of guitarists that I loved, Beck, Gary Moore etc etc but they never really influenced my tone. Later, I went through a metal phase in my teens and became good at it. Then in my late teens the blues were calling me back and I discovered SRV. I don't know where he was hiding that whole time, why had I never heard of him? All I know is that when I heard Texas Flood my mind was blown. The tone and the playing were out of this world. I then became heavily influenced by his playing and tone.

    Today, I guess you could say I draw from all three of them as my main sound, but my playing is influenced by many more guitarists.
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2020
  3. drex123

    drex123 Strat-Talk Member

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    Page, Gilmour, Anastasio
     
  4. SAguitar

    SAguitar Senior Stratmaster

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    Eric Clapton, Duane Allman, and B.B. King
     
  5. Michael919

    Michael919 Senior Stratmaster

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    Alex Lifeson
    Yngwie (vibrato and new-classical phrasing, rhythm, not speed), Blackmore, Uli (3 way tie)
    Gilmour
     
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  6. fastbob72

    fastbob72 Strat-Talker Silver Member

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    Funny my Dad had a similar influence on meIt was after I hired Let There Be Rock on VHS from the local video shop.

    He was generally and quite obviously unimpressed by AC/DC especially the antics of Bon and Angus.

    Some remark issued forth like 'that's nothing new The Who were wilder and louder in the 60s'.

    He then saw it as his duty to wean me off my misguided love for AC-DC and Iron Maiden then introduce mid 60s Rythmn and Blues music so a week later he came home with a The Who compilation video Who's Better I think and one about the British invasion of the mid 60s.

    It didn't work but ir did open up a whole world of music that paved the way for my modern bands. It also taught me that the sound that I loved in AC-DC but was missing in Iron Maiden or Kiss was the blues.

    I must have been approaching my 17th birthday and had begun to make some odd noises on the guitar.

    I love The Who to this day but it was two songs on that British Invasion video that absolutely branded a permanent mark on me.

    The first one Heartful of Soul by the Yardbirds. That riff Jeff Beck plays trying to mimic the sitar captured my soul to the point I sat and worked out the main riff that night. Thaylt in itself was huge for me.

    The other was Tale of Brave Ulysess by Cream. I think it was footage from the Goodbye Cream concerts. That was my first exposure to wah wah guitar and again that song is patt of my make up and all wah wah is judged against that song and the majority doesn't stack up.

    For someone who isn't a musician nor that huge a music fan he had a large influence on my musical tastes as a teen which went on to shape my love of music ever since.

    He introduced me to The Kinks, The Animals, Peter Green's Fleetwood, The Yardbirds and bizarrely The Beach Boys but The Hollies and ultimately The Beatles didn't translate the same. I can almost appreciate The Beatles achievements and I love A Day In The Life but there is something about John Lennon that grates on me plus if you hit your wife perhaps you shouldn't preach peace and act like Jesus - just an opinion that probably isn't shared.

    He was a great songwriter maybe not as great a human being and a little too mythologised. Which reminds me I might aswell annoy a lot of people and express my own opinion that the best thing Syd Barrett ever did, the only great thing was lose his mind and make room for David Gilmour. Do people honestly rate Piper At the Gates... Astronomie Domini was the only good song again an opinion that's all lol

    Sent from my SM-N910F using Tapatalk
     
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  7. Cyberi4n

    Cyberi4n Strat-Talker

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    Mark Knopfler
    Dave Gilmour
    Adrian Smith
    Billy Corgan
    Page Hamilton
    peter buck
    Steph Carpenter (early stuff)
    Pete Loeffler
    Tom Searle
    Gary Moore

    some of these are from a songwriting perspective, others are purely musicians who made me want to play, and the rest are musicians I wanted to sound like!
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2020
  8. White Dog

    White Dog Strat-Talk Member

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    LOL! Good thing we all know your bottom 19.
     
  9. davidKOS

    davidKOS still at home Strat-Talk Supporter

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    Not exactly - I just was not influenced by them. Lots of good players, which all were on the thread, who just didn't make an impression on me. Check my past posts for lists of players that did help from my somewhat quirky style.

    Now, I'd have no idea who really is on my bottom list!
     
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  10. mikej89

    mikej89 Senior Stratmaster

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    "GT player"?
     
  11. 50yearslater

    50yearslater Strat-Talker

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    Just read through all four and a half pages and kept asking myself, influences? Buddy Holly made me want to ditch the piano and get a guitar, but in terms of influences?
    1. Joan Baez (finger style to the nth degree, and one of my first fake books)
    2. Peter Yarrow and Noel Stookey (same reason)
    3. Bob Dylan (a good song can make up for more than a few question-marks, and when he went electric he was smart enough to have Mike Bloomfield standing behind him!)
    Tom
     
  12. stevierayfan91

    stevierayfan91 Deeply SHY. Strat-Talk Supporter

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    Hi, buddy. Think GT was a shorthand abbreviation for guitar.
     
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