may I know your most used skill/technique to jam ?

Discussion in 'The Online Jam Forum' started by drugo, Sep 13, 2021.

  1. GhostJam47

    GhostJam47 Strat-Talker

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    this is good advice.

    A technique I use is an extended descending phrase, where I might play a lick using notes 5/6/7/8 of the scale, then a similar lick using notes 4/5/6/7, then 3/4/5/6, all the way back down to the 1. Now you've strung several bars that have some structure on cohesion.
     
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  2. fezz parka

    fezz parka fezz parka

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    Listening. Knowing the form.

    Playing inside the track instead of on top of it. Take the shape of the vessel you're pouring yourself into.

    Develop a theme. Thematic development and voice leading.

    Yep.

    Blowing straight scales or modes are shortcuts. Doing pushups.
     
  3. of this world

    of this world Senior Stratmaster

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    in a certain genre perhaps, but Pat Martino? Joe Pass? Grant Green? Gabor Szabo? Paco de Lucia? Ivan Jones? Kenny Burrell? Jim Hall? Emily Remler? you may as well say their entire bodies of work are "boring"
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2021
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  4. Groundwire

    Groundwire Strat-Talker

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    Resist the urge to play something right away. Listen to the music for a second and get inspired.

    Try to develop hooks or themes and build on them.

    Use different motifs for different sections. If one section has you playing chords, then for another start with double stops, 6ths, octaves, or single notes.
    Try changing directions within the phrase, instead of one long descending line and then a long ascending one.

    Change rhythmic patterns and syncopations often. Don’t always play on the 1. Leave gaps for the other instruments.

    Try milking a single note over multiple chord changes. Find different rhythms to play that one note.

    When all else fails: Step on another pedal.
     
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  5. drugo

    drugo Strat-Talker

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    Hi @ripgtr
    I agree , I try always to play melodies based on chord progression , i use the scale to move on the fretboard
    Playing just scale are really very boring
    may I know your approach about creating melodies ?
    thanks

    by the way good reading
     
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  6. amstratnut

    amstratnut Peace thru Music.

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    I recently started taking lessons again and am really enjoying it.

    I recommend finding a good teacher and tell them you would like to expand your vocabulary.

    Currently, I have transcribed a solo and instructor is having me take bits of it and inserting it into other solos. Also moving the bits around pitch wise. So play it a 4th up or a 3rd down, etc and see what you get.

    If you stay focused (difficult for me) developing little bits helps your solos to be more coherent due to repetition of recognizable ideas.

    I think , at least for me, we feel the need to play every idea we have in each solo. Its not necessary.
     
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  7. drugo

    drugo Strat-Talker

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    Hi
    do you use a software like audacity/goldwave or trascribe software?
    can slow down very well a song and a solo
     
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  8. Slacker G

    Slacker G Strat-O-Master

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    Free form. Most important is to always listen to the other musicians as opposed to thinking what I am going to play. Melding into the groove and playing within it is the objective. I prefer other musicians, especially guitar players in a jam, to hold center stage while I add non distracting phrases that compliment their playing. I never take a ride unless I am asked to.
     
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  9. amstratnut

    amstratnut Peace thru Music.

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    I have audacity that I use for jamming along and transcribe for slowing things down.
     
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  10. Relaxing at Cam

    Relaxing at Cam Strat-Talker

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    If it's listed, I look up the key and the mode to remember where the half steps are.

    If I don't know the key and the mode, I play along with the recording and look for the tonal center. From there, I'll find some notes I can use. Once I have some good notes, I'll improvise from there. If it gets boring, go up an octave, then go back down.
     
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  11. myredstrat

    myredstrat Senior Stratmaster

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    play in tune, and try to serve the song, not your ego.
     
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  12. ripgtr

    ripgtr Most Honored Senior Member

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    Honestly, it is intuitive at this point, for the most part.
    I guess listening and learning a lot of solos, see how they are built, imitating at first.

    There are 3 types of solos in my view.
    1. The melody of the song. Real common in stuff like old country, where you play an interpretation of the singing melody, or you start there and go out from there.
    2. A distinct, separate melody. This can kind of ghost the vocal melody. Or it can be a piece that stands on its own.
    3. Licks. Though they have their own melody, the lick must make sense (this is where learning other people licks, and using them as a basis, which you of course manipulate and change, comes in handy).

    An interesting solo is Nowhere Man. The chordal guitar part kind of ghosts the melody. It doesn't really play the melody, but does decend like it does. The second lick repeats the first rhytmically. The 3rd lick is similar but different rhytmically and then descends for the 4th one. Those last two sound a little "off" setting up the tension, then the slide down to the tonic, which resolves the tension. All builds to the tension and release, you can do that as many times as you like, though often building to the last big finish.

    A good "lick" solo is Vince Gill Liza Jane. Starts low, builds to the higher notes as it goes up the chords, then settles down and "releases" back on the tonic.
     
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  13. StratUp

    StratUp Senior Stratmaster

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    I see three factors helping in playing the blues:

    1. Listen to a wide variety of blues - older probably better than newer. Lots of them. Just get your brain to be the blues
    2. Play it from the soul. If you don't feel it, it shows. Be the blues.
    3. Mimic what the greats have done. Try playing the 2+ hour collection below as a backing track. As each song comes up, figure out the key, then do a call and response sort of thing where you listen to the other lead and try to repeat the notes and style played. No one is listening but you, so just go for it and figure out what you can. Play right through the vocal sections, no one will complain. Learn from the myriad of styles in there.

    Those steps should help lead you to this, which I think is key:

    2+ hours of slow blues:

     
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  14. Sarnodude

    Sarnodude Most Honored Senior Member

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    I play Youtube videos on my TV... crank the TV loud, and play along to whatever songs I like at that moment. Usually, it's classic rock.

    DISCLAIMER: This is my way to practice, it's probably not the best way
     
  15. ripgtr

    ripgtr Most Honored Senior Member

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    That sounds good.

    This was my source. BB said he got a review that said "BB sings, then Lucille sings" and said that was a great compliment. His playing was always about being very "vocal" like.
     
  16. rolandson

    rolandson Dr. Stratster

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    Listening to the melody. It'll tell you all you need to know.

    There isn't any rule or requirement to remain fixed into a "flavor"...mode or whatever. Sometimes breaking away from what you've accepted as your "normal" will open doors and windows you never knew existed.

    Listen to the way people outside your chosen genre build a story around their approach.

    My technique? I'm a thief. I have no trouble throwing out a jazz, rock, or classical chiche in the midst of a blues piece. It tends to improve the flavor, sorta like seasoning. I stole a lot from Charlie Parker and John Coltrane.
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2021
  17. drugo

    drugo Strat-Talker

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    Hi
    it's right knowing scales (at least major/minor/penta) ,chords in different shape and playing keeping the key signature , and theory of music

    but it's far right what many of you have written about melody , licks , listen lots of music , study solos and the song structure and so on ,many of the most beautiful solos are rich of melody ,the right notes and a great feeling of the player
     
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  18. rolandson

    rolandson Dr. Stratster

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    When asked about a particular performance, many of the greatest musicians on the planet will simply say...
    "I don't remember, I just played."

    Analysis is wonderful in the laboratory and classroom, and a real pain in the ass on stage. Herb Ellis had an expression:

    "You can't think your way to a new way of playing, but you can play your way to a new way of thinking."

    So stop thinking and start playing what you're feeling.
     
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  19. fezz parka

    fezz parka fezz parka

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    Follow the arpeggios of the chord progression. 1-3-5-7. Then mix them up.

    7-3-5-1.
    3-7-5-1.
    Etc.

    Then add neighbor tones.

    Hit chord tones on the changes.

    Always resolve to a chord tone on the I/i.

    This was an improv jam here.

    Chord tones and following the changes. 1 take, complete. No punching, no rehearsal. 1 listen through, and I just played.

     
  20. StratSounds

    StratSounds Senior Stratmaster

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    My ears, that’s it.
     
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