may I know your most used skill/technique to jam ?

El Gobernador

fezz parka
Apr 21, 2011
35,659
Nunyo, BZ
Theory doesn't help you solo...it explains what you did after the fact.

Firstly...sing a line.
Then...go play the line.

Scales? It all starts with the major scale. Everything springs from it.

Also...the chord progressions the major scale builds. Incorporate the arpeggios into your soloing. Use them as touchstones to land and take off from.

Lets say you're playing a I/IV/V7 in the key of C.

The I is CEGB. Cmaj7.
The IV is FACE. Fmaj7.
The V7 is GBDF. G7.

Over each chord...play the arpeggios for it. 1537 1357 1753 etc.

If you don't believe me ( you should...but still....) here's LC.



After you work that add neighbor tones. But use those arpeggios (the chord tones) to take off from and resolve back to after your phrase.

If you don't believe me (again...you should. I know what the f I'm talking about) here's Jody Fisher.



Truth is...if you hit those chord tones...you can really play whatever you want in between.

It's really about voice leading and thematic development with chord tones as the anchor.

But first...sing or whistle a melody. Then play it. :)

Also...realize this isn't baking a cake. It takes years. Years of hard work. And years of fun too.
 

GhostJam47

Strat-O-Master
Apr 21, 2021
882
Seattle
I suggest doing that more than you think you should. It wont sound good right away. You have to develop a sense of time and feel over a period of time.

There are no shortcuts. Well, chord tones are the shortcut. Playing chord tones WILL open the doors for you. Give it time and put the time into it.

To add to this:

Find a simple 2 chord progression. Pick your favorite scale shape, and find the triads of those 2 chords within the scale. Now jam over it hitting only the triads of the respective chords. Practice this a lot.

Then practice it, playing all the notes of the scale, but paying special attention to the triads. This might sound forced and clunky especially at first. For me, I find I never sounds good when thinking or trying to hit specific notes.

Eventually, you will find your playing will naturally start incorporating more of these notes in while you're not thinking about it. All of a sudden more of your licks sound "right" within the context of the track.
 

El Gobernador

fezz parka
Apr 21, 2011
35,659
Nunyo, BZ
Such a simple idea that makes an awful lot fall into place. Sung ideas are almost always better, more reality based and easier to articulate in the fingers than non-sung ideas- in my personal experience that is…

You're not relying on muscle memory. In other words, no pocket licks.

In time and in tune keeps you gigging.

Knowing that dissonance must resolve to consonance.

Tension demands to be released.

You're always a half step away from being a hero...or a chump.
 
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walter01

Strat-Talker
Jan 28, 2022
158
United Kingdom
Hi

May I know your most used skill to jam with other players or play "over" backing tracks?

I used almost everytime the caged system according the key signature , and tring to respect the chord progression "falling" on the notes of the chord , mostly on the 2 or 3 for the triads or 4 notes of the cords and sometime "hit" 2 or more notes or 3 notes of the chord

i know almost every scale , but i like mostly pentatonic scales and adding and subtract notes and sometime mix with other scale ,often with blues scale

but very often I fell "caged" , i mean i fell i do always the same things , beeing boring

thanks
ps sorry for my poor english
Yep. Scales and the caged system are pretty boring after a while. Just try and play what comes into your head. If you screw up a few times, no worries. I never play the same solo twice. When I was learning to play, many years ago, there were no lessons or google channels. We just sat by our old Dansette record players and played over the tunes. Duane Eddy, the Shadows, the Ventures, Eddie Cochran and of course Elvis! I’m 78 now, live in France and still gig three times a week, plus jams in various bars. Jam with players better than you. Always be humble, ask questions and you will soon break out of the limiting caged system and scales! Mix up those goldarned notes! Listen to Larry Carlton and Steve Lukather. Sublime players! Go for it Drugo! Play on the edge Of your ability!
 

tweeker1

Strat-Talk Member
Jan 5, 2018
29
USA
I’m mostly a singer and rhythm player, trying to figure out some lead stuff. I was stuck in the pentatonic scales for years, until I said to myself, “hey, why not approximate the vocal melody, and then branch out from there?” That helped a bunch! I’m also working on the question/answer, repeat and vary technique. I’ll never be a serious lead guitarist, but I’ve now got a tool kit to sharpen my “skills”.
 

dasherf17

Strat-Talker
Nov 1, 2021
121
25 miles SE of Rogers Mn
Hi

May I know your most used skill to jam with other players or play "over" backing tracks?

I used almost everytime the caged system according the key signature , and tring to respect the chord progression "falling" on the notes of the chord , mostly on the 2 or 3 for the triads or 4 notes of the cords and sometime "hit" 2 or more notes or 3 notes of the chord

i know almost every scale , but i like mostly pentatonic scales and adding and subtract notes and sometime mix with other scale ,often with blues scale

but very often I fell "caged" , i mean i fell i do always the same things , beeing boring

thanks
ps sorry for my poor english

It's a toss-up between feeling/hearing, hearing/feeling...not really sure which is dominant...it's a combination of music and groove...
 

rd2rk

New Member!
Silver Member
May 19, 2013
7
Lakewood
Lots of good advice here.
One thing I haven't seen mentioned is dynamics.
When you're playing a LEAD you're LEADING the band.
Just like listening is important, if the band isn't listening to YOU it won't work.
If you start an extended solo with a ROAR and a lot of notes, bring it back down and play less notes. Leave holes. Build it back up, bring it back down and finish with a BANG!
Try to keep in touch with the other players. Body language isn't only for stage theatrics!
 

drugo

Strat-Talker
May 16, 2018
388
Rome
hi
i have started several weeks to play according the cords progressions , mostly triads
it's much better
about listen the drummer well , may have very heavy hands :(
and many times my strats or teles does disappear , i guess are the single coils pickup
so often I grab my trusty Ibanes serie S japan with 2 humbuckers (duncan JB pickups ) and my valve marshall 800 amp 100W and my cabinet 4x12 390W :D:D
 

Doc538

Strat-Talker
Silver Member
Dec 10, 2017
467
Ma
How to explain ? My music knowledge is next to None. I just listen, then play without thinking about it. A little harder now that I am almost completely deaf, works only with quality headphones near max volume.

PSA: Protect your hearing !
 

Odell

Strat-Talker
Mar 24, 2011
131
Nashville TN
It's okay to lay out if you get lost or find yourself unable to keep up with the changes. Trust me; the other players will appreciate you. Make a mental note to learn the tune for next time.

Also, if you want to spice up your CAGED thing, try adding some chromatic or diminished licks. For example, the half/whole scale can work very well for blues turn-arounds. I use them in moderation. Sit on them too long and they can sound mechanical but used sparingly, they can sound "out" in a good way.
 
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StratUp

Most Honored Senior Member
Sep 5, 2020
8,079
Altered States
It's okay to lay out if you get lost or find yourself unable to keep up with the changes. Trust me; the other players will appreciate you. Make a mental note to learn the tune for next time.

Also, if you want to spice up your CAGED thing, try adding some chromatic or diminished licks. For example, the half/whole scale can work very well for blues turn-arounds. I use them in moderation. Sit on them too long and they can sound mechanical but used sparingly, they can sound "out" in a good way.
I get by on technique, tone, vibrato and use chromatic bull**** that lands on a good note.

I like a little chromatic too... depending on the key (major, minor, etc) but here and there. More in the minor IME, but I am a hack. In most cases, too many in a row kills it. Just toss one in here and there. Although, there are a few places where you can run them.
 

Dadocaster

Dr. Stratster
Mar 15, 2015
28,122
Sachse TX behind the cemetary
I like a little chromatic too... depending on the key (major, minor, etc) but here and there. More in the minor IME, but I am a hack. In most cases, too many in a row kills it. Just toss one in here and there. Although, there are a few places where you can run them.
If you play fast enough and land right people think you can play.
 

albala

Dr. Stratster
May 10, 2012
10,625
Hilton Head, South Carolina
be close enough to hear the drums and stay in time with the drummer

start with simple and see what develops

listen and fill in the open spaces

try to make everyone feel comfortable. If you're the best musician in the room, start with the basics and slowly complicate things. If you're not the best, be confident in your abilities and keep your ears open.
 


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