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MP3 format dead??

Discussion in 'Sidewinders Bar & Grille' started by CalicoSkies, May 16, 2017.

  1. simoncroft

    simoncroft Most Honored Senior Member Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    60
    May 30, 2013
    SE England
    That's almost insane to an old technology guy like me!

    It's probably 15 years ago, when me and the missus were still working on magazines for TV broadcasters, that Gigabytes was rendered 'GB' but Terabytes was written out in full, in case some readers didn't know that TB meant. This was a time when racks of video tape machines were starting to be replaced by RAID storage as TV stations' main programme delivery systems to-air. That's right, even TV station engineering types had to be reminded what a Terabyte was.

    It wasn't long after that I got a 1GB memory card for my camera. Phew! Mister Hi Tech. But it got me through months and months of shooting max res pictures before it was full.

    I've just bought a 64GB SB card for my little location recorder. It should allow me about 30 hours of CD quality audio recording. It cost me £10.58 ($14 US).

    As you say, why bother with low res when you can have better?
     
    CalicoSkies and vid1900 like this.
  2. CalicoSkies

    CalicoSkies Senior Stratmaster

    Jun 10, 2013
    Hillsboro, OR, USA
    If the difference is not noticeable or barely noticeable, one still might want to be able to store more music (with a lossy format) rather than having full-quality audio.
     
    fezz parka likes this.
  3. Mr. Lumbergh

    Mr. Lumbergh needs you to go ahead and come in on Sunday, too. Strat-Talk Supporter

    Jan 10, 2014
    Initech, Inc.
    So much of what I have and listen to every day is still "low-res," because I acquired it back when that was the standard. I don't throw it away, but as I acquire more, I get it at the new standard.
     
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  5. vid1900

    vid1900 Strat-Talker

    420
    Nov 25, 2016
    USA
    With my current "iPod" (the Pioneer XDR-100) I have 544 gigs of onboard storage.

    So with high quality mp3s, that's 70,000 songs.

    With FLACs, that's 20,000 songs.

    I'd say that having your favorite 20,000 songs at your fingertips is enough for most people (but if not, you can just swap out the 2 memory cards in about 5 seconds, and listen to your next favorite collection).

    Because I often listen to the XDR with headphones, I can certainly hear the difference between the FLACs and MP3s.

    When I drive, the XDR syncs with my truck via bluetooth, so the sound quality is not as important.
     
  6. s5tuart

    s5tuart Bop-It Instructor. Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    72
    Aug 8, 2011
    Bedford, UK
    Simon. You'll probably be aware of the turntable manufacturer Manticore. I was their Production Manager in the 80's. Doug, the owner could tell, in blind tests, which belts from different manufacturers were spinning the platters!
    It's possible to train your ears to the n-th degree, but I do maintain that there is a certain level at which critical listening becomes more important than what is being listened to, and at that juncture it all becomes rather pointless IMHO.
     
    simoncroft likes this.
  7. lonegroover

    lonegroover Senior Stratmaster Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    56
    Mar 5, 2016
    England
    We aren't yet at the stage where you can have as much better as you want, unfortunately. For example I like to have as many albums as possible on my phone, and in MP3 format (I use ~256kbit VBR) I can get more than 1200 albums on. In FLAC format the same number of albums take up nearly half a terabyte, and as yet I don't know of a phone that takes cards of that capacity.

    Decently encoded MP3s can sound pretty good, even through HiFi speakers and through typical earbuds few people would be able to discern a difference between good MP3s and lossless.
     
    rcole_sooner likes this.
  8. Stark

    Stark Ghost of Johnny Thunders Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    47
    Jul 16, 2011
    Richmond Annex, CA
    I have to admit, I really don't care about the file delivery format—I have a 40-mile commute from my place in the Richmond Annex to the DoR office in Fremont via BART train, so I plug the headphones into my phone and let the music do its thing.

    The Jeep stereo has an aux input for my phone but if I am driving home from Richmond station after work and the commute back from Fremont, 95% of the time I just want "radio silence" around me.

    Either way, mp3 may not be the highest quality audio solution but it's fine for me.
     
    rcole_sooner likes this.
  9. simoncroft

    simoncroft Most Honored Senior Member Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    60
    May 30, 2013
    SE England
    I can totally believe that because the motor is not totally constant in its rotation but, rather, is pulled from position-to-position by the AC. The drive belt – as I'm sure you would be aware – plays a role in absorbing those inconsistencies. That's why you can hear the motor breaking up the HF reproduction very slightly on a direct-drive turntable. (At first, I couldn't hear it, but it was another Doug who directed me to what I needed to listen out for. After that, I couldn't help but hear it.) A slightly more rigid/supple rubber formulation would influence the 'smoothing' role of the belt somewhat, and could be audible.

    Since I started writing, @lonegroover and @Stark have made points that I feel is related to your second one: ultimately, it's about enjoying music, rather than the quality of the reproduction chain.

    The wonderful thing about the modern world is that we have these choices, and they are mostly relatively affordable. We're all old enough to cast our minds back to our first Hi-Fi and remember how much it cost, and how limited its performance was by today's standards.
     
    s5tuart likes this.
  10. lonegroover

    lonegroover Senior Stratmaster Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    56
    Mar 5, 2016
    England
    I never enjoyed listening to music as much as I did when I was 10 or 11, playing my brother's Beatles records on his mono 'record player', an appliance that looked something like a boxy suitcase with a speaker grille on the front. It didn't have bass and treble controls, just a "tone" knob.

    Come to think of it, shouldn't Stratocasters have bass and treble knobs by now? :eek:
     
    s5tuart and simoncroft like this.
  11. CalicoSkies

    CalicoSkies Senior Stratmaster

    Jun 10, 2013
    Hillsboro, OR, USA
    G&L guitars probably come closest to that with their passive treble bass controls - They use a treble cut and bass cut. I have a G&L Comanche, and I think its controls are very versatile - probably more so than Fender's tone knob.
     
  12. vid1900

    vid1900 Strat-Talker

    420
    Nov 25, 2016
    USA
    You want the LG V20 phone.

    It takes up to 2tb memory cards.

    It also has an ESS Sabre 9218 DAC audio chipset, so it's kind of an "audiophile's phone" (if there can be such a thing).

    https://www.cnet.com/products/lg-v20/specs/

    z1z.jpg
     
    lonegroover likes this.