My Dreadnought is a beast

StratoMutt

Dr. Stratster
Mar 15, 2019
11,328
SE Pennsylvania
I'm slightly over an hour away. I always think about visiting the place. What the hell am I waiting for? The fall I guess. The fall is beautiful in Pennsylvania.
The factory is still off limits to the public due to COVID. Check the Martin website for the latest.
 
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Cali Dude

Senior Stratmaster
Aug 9, 2020
1,398
California
I got my first Dreadnought acoustic just a few years back. I got the Eastman E10ss/v. It's an all solid wood construction dreadnought guitar, and is a short scale (24.75). It does sound something like a Gibson J-45, but was less than half of the price. Honestly, a J-45 is a dream guitar for me.
 

crankmeister

Most Honored Senior Member
Jul 9, 2020
5,999
Republic of Gilead
Not to play, it plays great and feels great. It's when I am playing... after 15 - 20 minutes of playing, the sound seems to blossom. I like it.

And, I actually prefer the D to the 000 for fingerstyle and light playing, I don't know... maybe I got a standout with this D.
I love dreadnoughts. I have 3 or 4 of them.

What are you playing?
 

crankmeister

Most Honored Senior Member
Jul 9, 2020
5,999
Republic of Gilead
Right!? I love dreadnoughts too, of all styles; with and without a cutaway, 6 or 12 string, rosewood or mahogany. View attachment 499339 And I agree, they are beast!
Acoustics aren't the same without the thump.

What's your jumbo there?

I have one "obligatory" OM size Stonebridge (aka Furch), it has a less common solid cedar top. But my real dreadnought beast is the Guild D-40 Traditional. The D'Angelico dreadnought cutaway gives me a solid rosewood back/sides and electronics, it's easier to play than the Guild but it doesn't have the same thump and resonance.

And the vintage 1979 Yamaha is just kinda there. Sounds good, nice for its age, but can't handle heavy strumming like the others.
 
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Gedster

Strat-Talker
May 11, 2021
147
NSW Australia
That is my 1980 Fender FJ70 Jumbo, here's a better pic:
View attachment 499342

Ooooh! Very nice. There was one listed for sale over here the other day at the princely price of $1500AUD. If I didn’t have so many guitars, I might have been tempted to go and have a word with him. A Fender copy of a J series Gibson, but in Rosewood!

I’ve got an F65 Rosewood/Spruce dread that’s a very nice guitar. I’m a bit of a fan of the F series Fenders. I think they’re well and truely undervalued.
 

Scott Baxendale

Most Honored Senior Member
Gold Supporting Member
May 20, 2020
5,555
Sante Fe, NM
Not to play, it plays great and feels great. It's when I am playing... after 15 - 20 minutes of playing, the sound seems to blossom. I like it.

And, I actually prefer the D to the 000 for fingerstyle and light playing, I don't know... maybe I got a standout with this D.
As you play the molecules of the wood heat up which is why the sound gets better after a few minutes of playing. As the top vibrates the movement and friction resisting that movement heat up the molecules a bit.
 

EC Strat

Senior Stratmaster
Gold Supporting Member
Dec 16, 2018
4,211
Louisville Kentucky
I got a Martin OMJM years ago and that was my only acoustic for a long time. Then I stumbled on my Gibson J-45. I love that damn thing. Hardly play the Martin anymore which is a shame. Its a great guitar. Thinking of selling it actually. I'd love to find the right D-35. Those are a cross between a harp and a cannon. Love them!
J-45’s are great! It’s on my bucket list no doubt
 

Gedster

Strat-Talker
May 11, 2021
147
NSW Australia
I had a 20 year love affair with Gibson acoustics but I always hankered for a D35 because I’d grown up playing the Japanese lawsuit era copies. I finally got one last year, so along with my 62 Gibson Southern Jumbo, I think I’ve got all of the acoustics that I will ever need, (you would think…). But that really doesn’t explain why I’ve spent the last 12 months playing a $400 Fender Newporter!

Neither of those glorious guitars can really be left on a stand even overnight at my place with 3 dogs roaming around so they tend to sit in their cases and only get dragged out occasionally to remind myself how bloody fortunate I am! What a life.
 

StratoMutt

Dr. Stratster
Mar 15, 2019
11,328
SE Pennsylvania
I have to agree! There's something about the power in a good dread. A new Martin Custom Shop 18 style for me. Loads of articulation and sass on tap. Kind of like playing a tele.

View attachment 499383 View attachment 499384

Stunning guitar there. Higher resolution would be most welcome. :)

Trees make great outdoor guitar stands, don't they? :D

40328454870_aa64078912_b.jpg


38579212020_8530eebf23_b.jpg


I bought a set of Martin strings once.
They go on my 12 string. Wish they were not MIM. : /

D'Addario EJ17 for the HD-28.
 

Rounder44

Strat-Talker
Mar 1, 2018
246
TUCSON, AZ
Collings are so good. The craftsmanship is second to none. Half the time I see one I'm afraid to pick it up. I wouldn't want to knick it or fall in love with it and buy it!

For all the tone they have they are incredibly rugged.

I had a D2H and was at a coffee house jam. There was a small 2' high stage and we were gathered around it sorta. Some knucklehead decided to bring his P-Bass sans amp and sit in with us. He grabbed a chair and managed to get 3 of the 4 legs on the stage before sitting down. As he came falling backwards he swung the bass around and a tuning key struck the Collings on the side just below the neck junction. Sent me backwards! I was expecting to see a bunch of splinters when I finally looked down. All I saw was a nice dent the size and shape of the big ol' tuning key! When I got home I gave it a once over and found no wood damage. I drop filled the nitro with some lacquer thinner (It was more crushed) and the dent virtually disappeared!

I used to work at a store as a photographer and saw dozens of Collings come through. I never saw one single blemish or issue on any of them. All stunningly perfect! Wish I could say that about other brands but....
 

Deniemeyer

Strat-Talk Member
May 17, 2021
17
Texas
For all the tone they have they are incredibly rugged.

I had a D2H and was at a coffee house jam. There was a small 2' high stage and we were gathered around it sorta. Some knucklehead decided to bring his P-Bass sans amp and sit in with us. He grabbed a chair and managed to get 3 of the 4 legs on the stage before sitting down. As he came falling backwards he swung the bass around and a tuning key struck the Collings on the side just below the neck junction. Sent me backwards! I was expecting to see a bunch of splinters when I finally looked down. All I saw was a nice dent the size and shape of the big ol' tuning key! When I got home I gave it a once over and found no wood damage. I drop filled the nitro with some lacquer thinner (It was more crushed) and the dent virtually disappeared!

I used to work at a store as a photographer and saw dozens of Collings come through. I never saw one single blemish or issue on any of them. All stunningly perfect! Wish I could say that about other brands but....

i was playing an outdoor gig with my Collings D2HSB. It was on a stand during break and the wind blew it over. Landed face first on the stage. My first thought was what an idiot I was to a) be playing this guitar here in 90 degree 100% humidity windy weather and worse b) leaving it alone on a stand. Don’t know how but it was fine, not a scratch on it. I proceeded to drink a few beers before the next set. Collings guitars are very very special.
 


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