Neck Bolt tightness and bass response

Discussion in 'Tech-Talk' started by SIngles Forever, Aug 28, 2021.

  1. Ronkirn

    Ronkirn Most Honored Senior Member

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    It has a lot to do with the guitarist and if he has the talent to elicit such sounds for the guitar..

    r
     
  2. azharkamal

    azharkamal Strat-Talk Member

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    Just turn the bass knob on your amp from 4 to say 7….abracadabra….more bass….
     
  3. stylemessiah

    stylemessiah Strat-Talker

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    Tune down to D, like Clapton has done in the past aka Forever Man, instant more bass/less treble...problem solved, didnt need a screwdriver
     
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  4. jonb

    jonb New Member!

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    I put down the Strat and picked up the Jazz and I had more bass for sure.
     
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  5. dbluesmi

    dbluesmi Strat-Talk Member

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    Baloney
     
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  6. DFGuitars56

    DFGuitars56 New Member!

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    Here's a trick I learned when I owned a guitar store....
    Loosen the neck bolts, stand the guitar up with the tail on a concrete floor, take a rubber mallet and whack the top of the headstock until you hear a snap or a crack. Now remove all the strings, remove all the neck bolts, remove the neck and throw it away. Go out and spend $500 on a new neck and go find someone who actually knows what the hell they're doing and have them properly install it. Next, and this is the most crucial part, never attempt to adjust your neck again. It is what it is. It sounds like what it sounds like. Learn to play better and use your amplifier and stomp boxes to get the sound you want. Try it. You'll like it.
     
  7. Strangher11

    Strangher11 Strat-Talk Member

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    I'd rather tweak a pedal or the amp, I do not mess with my neck.
     
  8. coolrene

    coolrene Strat-Talk Member

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    Alright so there seem to be 2 schools here: one that believes it is BS, another one that tends to believe it. What I can tell you from my own experience, is that a bolt-on neck needs to be properly adjusted in its pocket and sit tight.
    If you bolt on the screws tight before mounting the strings, you won’t reach an optimal setting.
    You need to screw the neck on without tightening the screws too much, mount the strings and tune them to pitch, verify the neck sits right by looking at the alignement and move it a tad if needed until it does, then only tighten the screws without going too hard. It will not bring you more sustain and you only risk to damage the neck. Just put on enough torque so that the neck won’t move in its pocket. Period.
    Enjoy your playing !
     
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  9. STK66

    STK66 Strat-Talk Member

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    A lot off accumulated bull**** is all of that, my bs meter is up towards the end of its scale.

    Make the neck joint as precisely matching the contour of the neck heel, have it perfectly flat with maybe just a quarter degree of tilt towards the neck (yes, slightly tilt the neckjoint so it tilts the neck a little bit backwards, you need to rise the saddle screws accordingly of course)

    Having the strings on while loosening the screws works about as good as having the guitar with a firm grip on it's neck, hoover it a couple of feet above the ground and then accelerate it towards the ground and make contact.

    I do it that way cause i do not fancy loosening screws and generally don't care much about the looks of my strat, since for me a guitar is a tool wich enables me to earn my living and that's about it for me.

    It needs to function near perfection, the frets need to be precisely leveled and last not least, also properly seated in the fretboard.
    Because i do have very loooong fingers and fairly big hands, i love to play baseball bat sized necks.

    Since it's my profession i build the necks i play myself.
    This of course gives me all the freedom and room to put some inventions onto and build them into a neck.

    Have a look at how your speakers are screwed into their cabinet.
    Did you see those nuts? I put those into a neck, before i glue the fretboard onto the base neck. Basically i make a neck, then saw the top slice off, using a thin saw blade, then route the channel for a trussrod as well as 2 other channels i use to glue carbonfiber rods into.
    I play very thick strings from 0.62 to 12, so thats a good measure against to much strain on a truss rod.

    Next thing i do is lathe my own, very precise bushings for the tuning machines, steel bushings, glued into the according holes for the tuners.
    I do have the back of the headstock routed so it does accomodate a 1.5mm thick steel plate, also glued into the route.

    I make scarf neck joints to give me the possibility tilting the headstock slightly backwards, therfore there will be no stringtree hassle ever.
    Relying on a precisely made scarf joint enables one to run along with the grain structure of the wood while still being able to tiilt the headstock backwards.

    All trussrod adjustment is done by the heel of the neck, employing the same trussrod and method peavey or evh (by fender) does it on their "wolfgang standards". I do like the way this system works and the fact you can go along using a nail, adjusting the trussrod, should need be.

    I hate having to carry a toolbag with me in order to being able changing strings, adjusting trussrod........bah.

    I have built a lot of guitars and serviced or repaired 5 times as much.
    In general my customers have been so pleased with what i was able to do for them and their guitars that they where kind enough to invite their bunch of bass and guitarist friends into my shop.

    I never had to spend any money on advertising.
    By now i am retired and a pensioner, enjoying his retirememt as good as i can. I stopped working for i have had serious health issues, still i do play music actively and of course help my old customers, should need be.

    In general, there is a lot of blablablabla on the net, also a lot of ill minded scam, do not believe a thing you hear unless you really know the guy saying so and him willing to prove his words.
    Do please not, under no circumstance fall for advertising bull.....
     
  10. mcmike27

    mcmike27 Strat-Talk Member

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    I have done this after a string change...more to reseat the neck with the weather changes mostly...normal tension..you can hear the distinct little 'pop' then just retighten the screws (not too tight)...and you are done....then I finish my setup chores....cut strings...check neck bow...no strings....new strings... stretch the new strings...tune to pitch...check neck bow again...check height first fret...then at the 17th fret (adjust as necessary usually just little tweaks on saddles) ...pickup height....intonate...clean pots and 5 way...then all set until next time...
     
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  11. coolrene

    coolrene Strat-Talk Member

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    Yep, that’s the discipline and the way it goes…
     
  12. FrieAsABird

    FrieAsABird Strat-O-Master

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    I just use concrete to make sure my neck is in the neck pocket tight enough :whistling:
     
  13. Doc538

    Doc538 Strat-Talker

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    I solved this delema by buying a set neck Les Paul :rolleyes: and wow it does sound different so I then losened my strats neck screws and slid a copious amount of super epoxy into the neck joint and retightend the screws, afterwards I strung it up and wow what a difference !!! It didn't sound anything like it did before.... Seems I forgot to de shim the neck first and now it buzzes like crazy but man you aught to hear all that base :cool: Oh wait a minute my bad, seems I turned the tone down by accident. :confused:
     
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  14. Afishman9

    Afishman9 Strat-Talk Member Gold Supporting Member

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    Other than string gauge, do pickup adjustments make a difference for your guitar's thinness? To a point, closer to the strings will be boomier, but sometimes less distinct. Too close and you get Stratitis.
     
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  15. SalvorHardin

    SalvorHardin Strat-O-Master

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    No.
     
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  16. tanta07

    tanta07 Senior Stratmaster

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    Did you get around to recording before and after the neck bolts thing?
     
  17. tim gueguen

    tim gueguen Strat-Talker

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    The Japanese custom guitar maker Freedom Guitar Research uses what they call the Arimizo Single Point neck joint on some of their instruments. It combines a dove jointed neck with a round metal plate with a single large screw in the centre. The idea is that by adjusting how tight this screw is you alter the tone of the instrument. Makoto Fukano, the guy behind Freedom, claims he got the idea by noticing tone differences in how a bolt neck instrument sounds depending on how tight things are screwed together. As you can imagine expensive Japanese custom guitars generally don't turn up in my part of Canada, so I have no direct experience with the concept. You can read about FGR at the following thread from TalkBass.
    Freedom Custom Guitar Research - A visit (pics and some comments) | TalkBass.com

    And Freedom's current English website.

    Freedom Custom Guitar Research (fcgrtokyo.com)
     
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  18. Brucegomb

    Brucegomb Strat-Talker

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    hey, it helped out Frankenstein eh?
     
  19. Slartybartfast

    Slartybartfast Strat-Talker

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    Wow - lot of rude assholes this morning - and they clearly don't know anything - not intelligent enough to be annoying, even. To answer your question, yes I know this trick. Does it help? Probably has to; more contact means better tone and sustain automatically, never mind these clowns. The most important thing is to have the neck cranked on there pretty good, but the trick is to make more contact area by including the part of the neck heel facing the bridge. It works like this: With the guitar tuned more or less to pitch, slowly and gradually loosen the neck screws until you think the strings are pulling the neck against the front wall of the pocket - that's where they achieve the extra contact. Some people say they hear a quiet "click" or "crack" when the neck slips in; then you know you're done. Can you hear the difference? Who knows. I just got into doing it on all the parts casters I build without thinking about it. It has to do something. GOOD LUCK!
     
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  20. Slartybartfast

    Slartybartfast Strat-Talker

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    I've done it to five partscasters in a row. I've never done a real A/B test but I can say my guitars all have strong resonance and sustain. Also if one neck screw seems a tiny bit stripped I always fix it so all four screws can be cranked with zero slippage.
     
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