Neck question

Discussion in 'Stratocaster Discussion Forum' started by seanskull92, Aug 1, 2010.

  1. seanskull92

    seanskull92 Strat-Talker

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    i have a 1996 american strat that has all the original neck and parts but the neck has been screwed up. ill elaborate, i got the guitar in 2001 and the finish on the neck was very dry, to the point where between some frets it actualy chipped off in small pieces, so i had it re finished, but it was not the best job. the finish is a very heavy lacquer that is so think it comes almost halfway up the medium jumbo frets which bugs the hell out of me. its almost has a "sticky" feel to it. my question is two parted actually. can this problem be fixed by sanding/would it even be a good idea?
    and if i got another neck would it be a bad idea re sale wise because the current neck has the "fender 50th anniversary" silver stamp on it?

    thanks guys.
     
  2. gcat

    gcat Senior Stratmaster

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    The chipping poly on maple necks was sort of common in that era. If you're certain the refin was lacquer and not poly, you can use some lacquer thinner to take it down. Might be a messy job.
     
  3. seanskull92

    seanskull92 Strat-Talker

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    it was done by a dude that paints cars. so beats the piss out of me what he used. looks like lacquer to me tho.
     
  4. gcat

    gcat Senior Stratmaster

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    Well, lacquer thinner will dissolve lacquer, but not polyurethane, so you could test to see what it is. They look very similar.
     
  5. Yogi

    Yogi Most Honored Senior Member

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    I wouldn't worry much about resale, the guitar took a hit to resale the moment you had the original neck refinished. Also its not like the model is particularly valuable anyway. There were 50th anniversary strats which are worth more, and then everything else produced that years also got badges but their value is the same as similar guitars from the era.
     
  6. Ronkirn

    Ronkirn Most Honored Senior Member

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    To get lacquer that thick, you would have to dip the neck in a bucket of the stuff… many times.... If an auto refinisher did it, I'm betting poly... and the stuff they use can go on incredibly thick... further, it will take a jack hammer and explosives to get it off....

    Take a rag, damp with lacquer thinner, or fingernail polish remover, then touch the neck in a concealed spot .. if the finish melts instantly.. it’s lacquer… if not.. It’s something else… if it doesn’t do anything after repeatedly wetting it with the thinner, it’s poly and you’ll have to hire a demolitions expert to help ya blow it off…

    Ron Kirn
     
  7. gcat

    gcat Senior Stratmaster

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    As for sanding, you'll probably take more metal off the frets than thickness off the poly.