New player question

Discussion in 'Tech-Talk' started by AlexJay, Jan 12, 2021.

  1. Willmunny

    Willmunny Strat-O-Master Gold Supporting Member

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    Keep a guitar in easy reach, pick it up, every day. Even for short periods.
     
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  2. Richard McKay

    Richard McKay Strat-Talk Member

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    Since you already know piano, I'd recommend learning the notes on the neck. Set a metronome, play the A on each string in quarter notes and change strings each measure. Use the first 12 frets. Don't use open strings, use the 12th fret instead. Walk up, then down. Once you get three perfect reps, start changing strings after every two beats. Then every beat, then increase the metronome. Once you know the neck, you can translate from your piano knowledge to fretboard shapes.

    After that, work on triads on the top three strings, then on strings 3, 4 and 5. Major, minor, 7ths. That will get you pretty far and you can back-fill the rest.
     
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  3. Nadnitram

    Nadnitram Most Honored Senior Member

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    Interesting avatar.
    [​IMG]
    By any chance was your father in show business? A comedian, perhaps?
    upload_2021-1-15_12-1-19.jpeg
     
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  4. Snick

    Snick Strat-Talk Member

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    Hi AlexJay....welcome to the forum. Back to your question, the flat metal gauges are to determine the fretboard radius when it's unknown by placing them on the surface until one fits. The "T" shaped gauges are held with your fingers and are used under the strings to adjust the bridge saddles to the fretboard radius. That being said, I've never used either one during set up. As many others have stated, they are not really necessary to perform a setup.
     
  5. Bob Spumoni

    Bob Spumoni Senior Stratmaster

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    The t-shaped are supposedly, maybe actually, more useable with the strings on. I've never own either, however insignificant that fact might be.
     
  6. GitGeek

    GitGeek Livin' After Midnight Gold Supporting Member

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  7. BigDan

    BigDan Strat-Talker

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    I agree, I have the set with the handles. They are good for setting the saddles. After that I always put the trem up high and then set the tilt on the neck. Of couse this won't apply to vinage set up. Only standard and deluxe with 2 point trems. Mine is a compound neck so I use the 14 on the 22nd fret. As a new player might I suggest looking into the CAGE system. I played around for 30 years until I got some instruction on the CAGE method and transposing.AKA the nashvile number system. It opened it up for me. A lot others too.
     
  8. archetype

    archetype Senior Stratmaster

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    Hi, @GitGeek and all. IMO despite what Dan says and shows, using guages to set strings to the radius of the neck is a waste of time. A guage m-i-g-h-t make it a bit easier to rough in the height of the strings, but only if you set the action correctly to one of the two center strings. If you do that, you might as well do the other 5 strings because the end result is typically a curve, not a uniform radius, as the low E and adjacent strings will be higher so they don't buzz. They'll end up even higher if you really hit the low strings and don't want them to rattle.

    YMMV, but mine hasn't. I've got neck guages and understring guages that I use for determining the radius of the fretboard. I maintain a pile of guitars and have never found radius guages useful for setting action.