NGD; The classics never go out of style

Discussion in 'Telecaster/Esquire Forum' started by jwj1701, Jul 3, 2019.

  1. RadioFM74

    RadioFM74 Senior Stratmaster

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    I belong to the same minority. I love both sides of the traditional tele configuration: the steel-guitar bridge assembly (this is so right @davidKOS … it is a steel guitar pickup in ancestry, in sound and at heart), as well as the deliciously juicy and fat neck pickup. It immediately evokes western swing, good blues and jazz. And Jeff Buckley’s version of Hallelujah…
     
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  2. davidKOS

    davidKOS not posting these days

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    OK I get it...but I wanted an even fatter juicier neck pickup!

    Leo liked Western Swing...steel guitars, etc.

    AND

    the original Teles had very different switching and tonal system.

    https://www.premierguitar.com/articles/Factory_Telecaster_Wirings_Pt_1

    "
    Remember, the original two-pickup Esquire wiring is characterized by the absence of a real tone control. Instead, the second pot acted as a blend or pan control between the two pickups, and this was only engaged with the 3-way pickup selector switch in the rear position. In May 1952, Leo modified the circuit to incorporate a true tone control by skipping the blend functionality and discarding any two-pickup combination.

    Today we know that it was not Leo’s idea alone, and this change was mostly made because of Bill Carson’s suggestions. Carson worked as a professional Western swing guitarist and was Leo’s favorite guinea pig for testing his Telecaster and early tweed amp designs. Carson never really liked the blender wiring on his Telecaster and came up with the idea to incorporate a real tone control.

    Viewing the 3-way switch from the playing position, here’s how Telecaster circuit was modified. This is the switching matrix I’ll use in all future Telecaster columns, so please keep it in mind:

    Position #1 (switch lever on the right): Bridge pickup alone with tone control engaged. (This is identical to today’s modern Telecaster wiring.)

    Position #2 (switch lever in the middle): Neck pickup alone with tone control engaged. (On modern Telecasters, this position engages both pickups wired in parallel.)

    Position #3 (switch lever on the left): Neck pickup alone with a bassy-sounding preset and no further tone control. (On a modern Telecaster, this selects the neck pickup alone with tone control engaged.)"
     
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  3. Seamus OReally

    Seamus OReally Mr. Serious Gold Supporting Member

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    Be advised that winding the high "E" string may be an exercise in frustration with slotted-shaft machines. I've got a Tele with slotted-shaft machines, and spent a couple hours last Sunday trying to get a 0.09 high "E" to wind up on the post, to no avail. Gotoh makes (and Fender uses) a set of locking tuners that look just like the Klusons, and my guitar will be sporting those in the next few days.
     
  4. RevBillyG

    RevBillyG Strat-Talker

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    If you were a boy scout I'm sure you could figure it out.
     
  5. circles

    circles Resident Pinball Enthusiast

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    Classic!
     
  6. ProSonicLive

    ProSonicLive Senior Stratmaster

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  7. errikwong

    errikwong Strat-O-Master

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    Interesting suggestion; I own a Baja and the 4-way with S1 switching does nothing for me. In the hands of another player, of course that might do it for them.