Noise reduction?

Discussion in 'Stratocaster Discussion Forum' started by Martyepisg, Jul 5, 2021.

  1. MGW-AB

    MGW-AB Strat-Talker

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    Never heard of them either but Fralin was selling dummy coil back plates 20 years ago at least. No. More than that actually. I'm thinking it was likely 1997 the first time I heard of them.
     
  2. Chipss36

    Chipss36 Strat-O-Master

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    Use a volume control.

     
  3. jvin248

    jvin248 Senior Stratmaster

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    .

    Replace that 'twisted pair' of wires to the jack with actual shielded cable. You use shielded cable from the guitar to the amp because twisted pair cables are noisy. Open up $100 Epiphones and you'll find shielded cable running to the jack. That cable run can be around half the noise reduction you can achieve.

    Shield the cavities. I use 'Nashua' aluminum flashing tape. No problem with adhesive conductivity because by the time you compress and route the tape into the cavities, overlap tabs and pieces, iron them down to the wood, they conduct just fin. Verify with a meter as you go and simply add bridge strips if you need to, wrinkle corners or edges. It's not hard. A roll of the flashing tape runs around $7 and will shield a couple dozen guitars. Copper tape is less forgiving than the aluminum tape.

    If you are handy, careful, and patient ... you can shield the inside of the pickup covers with the foil. Run a strip out to the pickguard to ground it. You must be very careful not to nick or ground out any of the bobbin wire, solder points, or bare hookup wires. That's where patience is important. A test you can do to see if this will help you, while the guitar is still assembled you can make a 'tinfoil hat' to cover the pickup and run a wire or tinfoil strip to the bridge so the hat is grounded. See if that cuts the particular noise you are getting. I have a couple of humbucker guitars that were fully shielded but one had uncovered pickups and the other covered. The uncovered pickups were noisy playing in front of the recording computer. I made the noisy one a tinfoil hat and it went as quiet as the one with factory pickup covers. Same trick works on Strat coils.

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  4. Martyepisg

    Martyepisg Strat-Talk Member

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    Thank you this is very helpful. I’ll give an update when I do the work.
     
  5. Martyepisg

    Martyepisg Strat-Talk Member

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    To close out this thread I took the following steps and it worked like a charm: painted interior cavity with two coats of shielding paint, and changed the jack wires from the twisted cloth pair to an insulated pair. there is still a little noise but it is at a low level I would expect and don't mind in a set of single coils that are not themselves noiseless.
    Thanks everyone for your help it is very appreciated!
     
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  6. Martyepisg

    Martyepisg Strat-Talk Member

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    Updating the thread just to add that I also removed the treble bleed as suggested by Hal Nico in above post.
    Just adding in case anyone has similar issue that they want to take on. So I did 3 things to reduce (and nearly eliminate noise)
    1. Paint cavity with shielding
    2. Replace cloth jack wires with insulated
    3. Remove treble bleed
     
  7. rolandson

    rolandson Dr. Stratster

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    Damn, I didn't see this until today. For that I am sorry.

    My experience with shielding paint has been disastrous...
    Over time, the components that make it an effective shield deteriorate; the solids separate from the substrate in the form of a fine, electrically conductive, particulate...dust. Electrically conductive dust that works its way into everything.

    I speak from experience.
    I have a 1964 Strat that had this stuff applied and the dust was in everything. Completely removing it has proven impossible. I've gotten the dust out of the pickups and switich, but the residual "paint has been a different story. I've gone the shielding tape route hoping that the adhesive will bind to the remaining paint and assist in peeling it off, but it is truly a last ditch effort.

    To say that it has adversely affected the value of the guitar is an understatement.

    My next move will be to apply lacquer to the remaing paint to seal it and prevent any further dust from causing anymore havoc.

    You might consider doing the same; clear coat over the paint so that it is sealed such that any deterioration of the material is contained.
     
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  8. diogoguitar

    diogoguitar Senior Stratmaster

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    Interesting that it costs "only" $250 now. I'm pretty sure I had seen it for $320 a year or two ago and gave up because of the price.
     
  9. Hal Nico

    Hal Nico Senior Stratmaster

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    Glad you have had good results.

    A couple of years ago my usually very quiet Guitar/Recording system/Guitars started to inject RF/Mains noise. I used one of these to track down a badly grounded extension box and my house Mains grounding was below par,

    http://rover.ebay.com/rover/1/711-5...0001&campid=5338148356&icep_item=322644893949

    I'm fortunate that I own my own house and have qualifications in House electrics so knew where my Grounding point was from my Mains box and how to renew the old Water-pipe Ground clamp after isolating my mains.

    If you do test or have a mains ground problem it's usually best to get a qualified Electrician in or contact the Landlord if rented accommodation.

    :)
     
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