Please spell “relicked” correctly.

Wrighty

Dr. Stratster
Mar 7, 2013
11,576
Harlow, Essex, UK
Haha – I've never really thought about it! Though a little digging would interestingly suggest that it may very well have derived from the term 'cod's wallop'!

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"What is a ‘cod’s wallop’? According to a learned counsel..the term is an East-end colloquialism for ‘a woman who cannot keep her mouth shut’."

https://public.oed.com/blog/a-load-of-old-codswallop/

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A VERY long article on the origin of 'codswallop', for anybody who might be interested :thumb: :) !

Thought that was ‘fishwife’?
 

jbylake

Fabulously Famous Nobody
Gold Supporting Member
Silver Member
Nov 25, 2019
2,361
Currently MIA
Okay let's get pedantic The OED does not list the word relic as meaning the way we use it in this forum. It is the remains of various things such as a Holy Person or a civilisation etc.
The correct word is distressed. Therefore the word relicked doesn't exist with either spelling.
Hell, you're a damned Englishman. What the heck do you know about speaking the English language. Ooops, never mind.:p:p
 

stratman323

Dr. Stratster
Apr 21, 2010
38,001
London, UK
When a C is followed by an E or an I, it makes the /S/ sound unless it is an already established rare exception. When you add -ed or -ing to a word like picnic, panic, or relic, you have to ad a K so that the C isn’t followed by an E or an I. So, it is picnicked, picnicking, panicked, panicking, relicked, and relicking. If you spell it “reliced,” it sounds like your adding lice to your guitar again. Gross. It would be cool if word got around, and we see it correct in future posts. Also, it’s “Squier.”

Yes, yes & yes! I'm glad that someone else understand this. Forget the OED, nobody there understands what guitarists mean by the word "relic", so you can't quote that book. There's a logic to the English language so it MUST be relicked. Reliced is stupid & an apostrophe has no place in a word like that.

It's RELICKED!
 

stratman323

Dr. Stratster
Apr 21, 2010
38,001
London, UK
I think that word is pretty-much universal!

That word is the only word in the English language (that I know of at least) that can be used as a noun, an adjective, a verb & an adverb. I would love to show y'all a sentence that proves this, but that sentence would probably break several ST rules at once...
 


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