Please spell “relicked” correctly.

stratman323

Dr. Stratster
Apr 21, 2010
37,973
London, UK
Lol, okay - you have me curious now. Not that I doubt you, but can you quote (or point to) any examples of actual technical documentation with 'verbified' nouns?

Not exactly, but years ago a friend from up North told me off for using the word "bin" as a verb. As in "bin it". She said I was wrong, it was a noun. Now "bin" is commonly used as a verb.
 

PeteGeordie

Strat-Talker
Feb 12, 2021
331
UK
Lol, okay - you have me curious now. Not that I doubt you, but can you quote (or point to) any examples of actual technical documentation with 'verbified' nouns?


Well I worked in IT industry and that was an old IBM saying.

Example off the top of my head: use of "to keyboard" instead of "to type"

keyboard as a verb is now in most dictionaries. Language evolves.
 

bluejazzoid

Strats Amore
Silver Member
Aug 14, 2009
8,504
Southeast USA
Well I worked in IT industry and that was an old IBM saying.

Example off the top of my head: use of "to keyboard" instead of "to type"

keyboard as a verb is now in most dictionaries. Language evolves.
That is a good example. And of course, the evolution of language is a real thing, and the widespread adoption and use of something now as ubiquitous as a computer keyboard makes perfect sense for it to give rise to a new term (or use).

But the issue with the word "relic" is that it's life as a verb is pretty much limited to a small percentage of guitar enthusiasts..... I'm not sure that's enough to open the door to a new dictionary entry, but who knows!
 

J4ME5

Strat-O-Master
Sep 1, 2020
989
X
But I think my point stands. I'll put it in small words--telling people how to talk is a jerk move. Unless they're your child, or they asked for a critique.

If the definition in the dictionary does not line up with common usage, that definition is wrong--or perhaps obsolete.

You see, I agree with essentially everything you are saying – I am VERY loose when it comes to language, and the rules (though I do believe one should understand the rules before one breaks them, I mean seriously – we CAN'T just have an absolute free-for-all – where 'night' can mean 'day' and 'black' can mean 'white', or 'good' can mean 'bad' – we MUST have a basic agreed upon standard!...). For me – as long as both the communicator – and the... communicatee understand eachother – then all / any is good. It was just the idea of a dictionary being a 'relic', that perturbed me :) !!! Though... I'm SURE (and I hope! – please correct me if I'm wrong) you were likely referring to the use of a paper dictionary – rather than the idea of a dictionary itself.

Regardless – in a hundred years, as language continues to evolve – it may be the case, that 'relic' becomes a verb, and that's fine – but as long as I live, knowing and understanding what the word 'relic' actually means – I will be not be comfortable using it to describe the process of 'artificially aging' a guitar. In my book, my personal book of 2021 – a 'relic' is an object of 'rare' and 'historical' significance. And if I HAVE to play along – and use the word, as others use it – I will have no option but to spell it:

Relic'd.

It's the ONLY sensible spelling, in my opinion! Reliced (liced, as in 'sliced') – or relicked (licked, as in lick) just don't cut it for me – they don't read as I believe the writer intends, at least not to my eyes. An apostrophe 'd' is odd – but not totally uncommon, I'd have thought. As to relic'ing – well, an apostrophe 'ing' isn't ideal either – but, it is (to my eyes at least) perfectly readable / understandable.

THIS IS ALL FENDER'S FAULT!!!!!! :) !
 

dirocyn

Most Honored Senior Member
Jan 20, 2018
6,797
Murfreesboro, TN
You see, I agree with essentially everything you are saying – I am VERY loose when it comes to language, and the rules (though I do believe one should understand the rules before one breaks them, I mean seriously – we CAN'T just have an absolute free-for-all – where 'night' can mean 'day' and 'black' can mean 'white', or 'good' can mean 'bad' – we MUST have a basic agreed upon standard!...). For me – as long as both the communicator – and the... communicatee understand eachother – then all / any is good. It was just the idea of a dictionary being a 'relic', that perturbed me :) !!! Though... I'm SURE (and I hope! – please correct me if I'm wrong) you were likely referring to the use of a paper dictionary – rather than the idea of a dictionary itself.

Regardless – in a hundred years, as language continues to evolve – it may be the case, that 'relic' becomes a verb, and that's fine – but as long as I live, knowing and understanding what the word 'relic' actually means – I will be not be comfortable using it to describe the process of 'artificially aging' a guitar. In my book, my personal book of 2021 – a 'relic' is an object of 'rare' and 'historical' significance. And if I HAVE to play along – and use the word, as others use it – I will have no option but to spell it:

Relic'd.

It's the ONLY sensible spelling, in my opinion! Reliced (liced, as in 'sliced') – or relicked (licked, as in lick) just don't cut it for me – they don't read as I believe the writer intends, at least not to my eyes. An apostrophe 'd' is odd – but not totally uncommon, I'd have thought. As to relic'ing – well, an apostrophe 'ing' isn't ideal either – but, it is (to my eyes at least) perfectly readable / understandable.

THIS IS ALL FENDER'S FAULT!!!!!! :) !

I agree. The concept of a dictionary is as relevant as it ever was, although as usage changes some of the definitions become obsolete and the paper dictionary is already obsolete.

Some 30 odd years ago I remember encountering the concept of "antiquing" furniture, which is to say--modifying it in order to look older than it really is, often for fashion or fraud. Not to be confused with "going antiquing" which just means shopping at antique stores.

I like "relic'd" better than reliced or relicked. The gerund form "relicing" is just as awkward as "relicking" and an apostrope "relic'ing" is perhaps worse. "Relic-ing" isn't terrible. But I suggest--antiquing a guitar is the process of making a relic guitar.
 

stratman323

Dr. Stratster
Apr 21, 2010
37,973
London, UK
YAnd if I HAVE to play along – and use the word, as others use it – I will have no option but to spell it:

Relic'd.

It's the ONLY sensible spelling, in my opinion!

The apostrophe has many uses in the English language. That is not one of them. It simply doesn't make sense in any way, shape or form to use an apostrophe there & in that way.

Whatever the answer might be (and you know my vote) that cannot be it.
 

PCollen

Senior Stratmaster
Silver Member
Feb 13, 2014
3,985
Florida
When a C is followed by an E or an I, it makes the /S/ sound unless it is an already established rare exception. When you add -ed or -ing to a word like picnic, panic, or relic, you have to ad a K so that the C isn’t followed by an E or an I. So, it is picnicked, picnicking, panicked, panicking, relicked, and relicking. If you spell it “reliced,” it sounds like your adding lice to your guitar again. Gross. It would be cool if word got around, and we see it correct in future posts. Also, it’s “Squier.”

Relic is a noun. There is no proper definition of the use of relic as a verb; that is a colloquialism.
 
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Wrighty

Dr. Stratster
Mar 7, 2013
11,362
Harlow, Essex, UK
What would be cool is if people actually spoke English, (the ones who allege to be English speaking anyway) and learned to actually express and/or comprehend a thought that consists of more than 240 letters, (note I avoided the use of characters).

I've pretty much given up on both.

Well, if you’ve given up what chance have the rest of us!?
 


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