Problem with neck

xosavog326

Strat-Talk Member
Jan 21, 2022
10
X
Hello,

I had a problem with skunk stripe on some guitar. The skunk stripe basically popped out and the finish was stripped from 2nd to 8th fret (the guitar was bought used so I don't know how this happened). It also slightly moved when pressing on it.
What I did is to apply some CA glue on it and around it, then I sanded it with 320-grit to 1500-grit sand paper in order to blend it and then polished it with rotary pads on drill.

Now I can't feel the skunk stripe anymore and it's really smooth but it doesn't look very good aesthetically.
From what I understand I basically need to remove the original finish from the whole neck, grain fill the skunk stripe, tint it and then apply poly finish again.
But I see two problems with this approach:
1. How can I match the tint color to the headstock? I don't want to sand off the decal and the serial number. I think that I could apply new decals but it's another step in the process to **** up.
2. Will the transition lines between the old poly and new poly visible?

So my question is basically if there is a better way to fix it or I should not bother with it?

N.B.: How bad I ****ed up that I sanded the CA glue on the neck without mask and used basic face mask when polishing with the polish compound on rotary pad? On one hand, every person that I saw on YouTube that did it, he did it without a mask but on other hand, I always see that people write that you need to use a mask or respirator when you sand.
If after all I will sand the whole neck, do I need a mask or respirator?
 

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sunburst_xxii

Strat-Talker
May 11, 2022
266
R86050
If I was you I would perhaps consider only sanding from the base of the neck, to the beginning of the headstock area? Like the Custom Shop do:

1959-Fender-LTD-Reverse-Telecaster-%E2%80%9CCustom-Shop%E2%80%9D-Aged-Daphne-Blue-over-3-Colour-Sunburst-24.jpg


5798l-1.jpg


...and then oil it up? I think people use 'Tung Oil' or 'Tru Oil' for this kind of job – but I'm open to correction there, and would appreciate if somebody else could clarify that?... I think – in my opinion – taking off decals, and trying to match tints could potentially turn into a nightmare! I personally think if you ended up with something close to the above examples, you'd be doing OK. Maybe the above look does not suit though... in which case, hopefully someone else can offer another approach 👍
 

retrobob

Strat-Talker
Aug 6, 2021
442
california
JMHO, looks like when you sanded the CA, you went through the original finish instead of flush to it. You could use a tinted CA glue to bring the color back in that area or a tinted clear in spray cans.
 

xosavog326

Strat-Talk Member
Jan 21, 2022
10
X
JMHO, looks like when you sanded the CA, you went through the original finish instead of flush to it. You could use a tinted CA glue to bring the color back in that area or a tinted clear in spray cans.
Well, it sounds promising but I'm afraid to make it worse.
I would to hear if someone had some experience with tinted CA glue.
 

bluejazzoid

Strats Amore
Silver Member
Aug 14, 2009
8,506
Southeast USA
I blew up your photo to make it easier to see:

1656620460240.png

If the stripe is glued and holding flush --and you can't feel it-- I would not worry about that myself.

But you should seal the exposed wood there so no moisture gets in. As suggested - something like tinted clear, then sand smooth and fuggedaboutit! :D
 

Miotch

Most Honored Senior Member
Jun 28, 2011
5,316
ok
Looks like a decent repair job. You could still blend in a tint and overspray, but I like it this way.

On the mask/respirator issue, what you did doesn't even compare to many of us old guys that used to work in body shops, brake shops, welding shops or paint shops with no respirators. We are mostly still alive 50 years later. I used to weld draping an asbestos cloth over the surrounding area. I probably ate a lot of lead paint. I might still ingest it when bored.

Unless you are hypersensitive, you'll be OK. I doubt many (or any) of us would have worn a mask for that.
 
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xosavog326

Strat-Talk Member
Jan 21, 2022
10
X
Thanks for all the answers so far.

I'm tempted to try the tinted CA glue but as this is my first time working with wood I'm quite hesitant.
Will something like the StewMac Amber tinted CA glue work?
 

retrobob

Strat-Talker
Aug 6, 2021
442
california
I use the amber tint a lot (you can lighten the tint by mixing with clear CA), get the slow setting it gives you more time to blend it. You can use Q tips and micro tips with the slow set to blend it into the areas you want. Let it dry over night and touch up any areas as needed. After it's dry, sand it smooth with 600 grit and polish.
You don't need a respirator for what you're doing, you can wear a mask for dust if it bothers you. However, if you two part clear urethane a respirator is required as well as other PPE.
TIP; I use sticky backed sandpaper cut into small peices and stick them to my finger to sand small areas without sanding the surroundings.
 

BuffaloHound

Senior Stratmaster
Sep 25, 2018
1,244
S
Form follows function (i.e.-“chicks dig scars”).

If it neck feels good I’d leave it. If it were my guitar I’d sand down the whole neck and leave it. But that’s how I like necks; satin, smooth, and fast.
 


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