Warmoth.com ad space available darrenriley.com Amplified Parts Lollar Pickups ad space available Reilander Pickups

Warmoth.com ad space available darrenriley.com Amplified Parts Lollar Pickups Guitar Pickups Reilander Pickups

Warmoth.com ad space available darrenriley.com Amplified Parts Lollar Pickups Guitar Pickups Reilander Pickups

Join Strat-Talk Today

Problems Finishing Neck With Tru-Oil

Discussion in 'DIY Strat Forum' started by markscience, Apr 17, 2017.

  1. markscience

    markscience Strat-Talk Member

    18
    Jan 3, 2013
    Media, PA, USA
    I've had good experience finishing necks using rattle can nito and rub on poly. For my latest build using an Allparts neck I decided to try tru-oil after reading it was easy to apply and created a great finish. I have about 6 coats on so far and I'm having issues creating a smooth/clean application right next to the frets. There are imperfections by the frets. Not sure if this is due to lint or something else I'm doing wrong. I suspect I used too much oil in one application. I've tried applying with coffee filters, but that did not seem to apply the oil right up to the frets. Now I'm using cotton fabric that seems lint free. See pics for reference. I've tried smoothing the imperfections with scotch brite pads and light sandpaper, but that has not helped. In one case I actually created a line parallel to a fret by mistakenly going across the grain.

    Questions- will additional coats of tru oil cover or hide these imperfections? Is there some other way to clean up the area by the frets? What could be causing my issue? If I decide to strip and spay with nitro, whats that best method to strip the tru-oil? Thanks for any advice! IMG_4462.JPG IMG_4466.JPG
     
  2. banjaxed

    banjaxed Senior Stratmaster Silver Member

    Mar 14, 2014
    Liverpool UK
    I don't think you will cover the imperfections with Tru oil. I have used it to very good effect on 3 occasions but the necks
    were all new. You may have to sand it to remove the imperfections and then apply VERY thin coats of Tru oil, and when
    thoroughly dry use fine wire wool in between coats. I found about 6/8 coats was enough.
     
  3. STK66

    STK66 New Member!

    Age:
    50
    8
    Feb 18, 2017
    DE
    You may wash the oil away by using paint thinner or just as well acetone. Acetone is a very effective helper getting rid of greasy stuff.
     
    BluesDontCare likes this.
  4. Forum Sponsor Sponsored posting

  5. markscience

    markscience Strat-Talk Member

    18
    Jan 3, 2013
    Media, PA, USA
    Thanks for the advice. I ended up using spray on paint stripper and scotch brite pads to remove the existing tru-oil. That worked fine, however it damaged the plastic fret markers to the extent that I need to replace those now (ugh). I considered reapplying the tru-oil again (more conservatively), but decided to spray amber and clear nitro instead, since I have more experience with that.
     
  6. STK66

    STK66 New Member!

    Age:
    50
    8
    Feb 18, 2017
    DE
    I have some abalone dot markers in the drawer of my workbench! I am located in Germany, where do you come from? Maybe i should send you those, so you might be able to continue your build?
    Do you want me to do so?
     
  7. markscience

    markscience Strat-Talk Member

    18
    Jan 3, 2013
    Media, PA, USA
    Thank you much for the offer! As a matter of fact I bought some abalone fret markers myself and started installing them today. So far so good on the installation, and they look great. Thanks again. By the way, I live in Pennsylvania in the USA
     
  8. LordOfPudding

    LordOfPudding Strat-Talker

    107
    Sep 27, 2015
    California
    I have had the same issue with lacquer and Danish oil not wanting to adhere next to the frets.
    Not sure, but I think it might be due to the use of glue when the neck was fretted.
    Next time I do a build, I will try acetone or naphtha next to the frets before applying finish.
     
  9. Sarnodude

    Sarnodude Strat-O-Master

    795
    Sep 26, 2015
    Mukilteo
    Just don't breathe the fumes!
     
  10. STK66

    STK66 New Member!

    Age:
    50
    8
    Feb 18, 2017
    DE
    In case you did, enjoy the ride......haha
     
  11. nadzab

    nadzab Senior Stratmaster Strat-Talk Supporter

    Despite the name, Tru Oil is not greasy or oily when cured, it produces a hard, durable finish.
     
  12. STK66

    STK66 New Member!

    Age:
    50
    8
    Feb 18, 2017
    DE
    I know very well what tru oil consists of.
    Read what is written on the can and tell me what the stuff consists of, mostly....
    Let me tell you that it indeed is oil! The thing about it is that it isnt mineral but biological oil and due to the absence of additives this oil hardens and then might be polished using fine grit steelwool! I would love to tell you exactly how the process goes for i know it exactly and in detail but i am a german and my english became rusty! I lack the proper words for a decent description. Would somebody take over here.....?please. Go into detail about the chemical process responsible for the hardening of the surface.