PSA announcement: peak vs pique

Lone Woof

Senior Stratmaster
Nov 30, 2014
3,724
WI
"Peak" as a noun means the top of something, as in the peak of a mountain. As a verb, it means to reach the highest point, as in "hula hoop popularity peaked in the 1960s."

"Pique" as a verb can mean to stimulate interest or curiosity, or to irritate or provoke. Meriam Webster says "to excite or arouse especially by a provocation, challenge, or rebuff."
 

Neil.C

Most Honored Senior Member
Mar 3, 2012
8,614
Surrey, England
"Peak" as a noun means the top of something, as in the peak of a mountain. As a verb, it means to reach the highest point, as in "hula hoop popularity peaked in the 1960s."

"Pique" as a verb can mean to stimulate interest or curiosity, or to irritate or provoke. Meriam Webster says "to excite or arouse especially by a provocation, challenge, or rebuff."

Or you can take a "peek".
 

Andmyaxe

Strat-Talker
May 12, 2021
273
USA
When I lived in Italy, a friend who was an Italian historian told me and several other friends that the origin of "picante" (Italian and Spanish for spicy) is that it "p*icks" at the mouth. He didn't seem to understand the chuckles he got from all the native English speaking friends in the group. Little did he know we learned two word origins that day. 😁
 

Hydr0

Senior Stratmaster
Aug 3, 2015
2,673
New York
"Peak" as a noun means the top of something, as in the peak of a mountain. As a verb, it means to reach the highest point, as in "hula hoop popularity peaked in the 1960s."

"Pique" as a verb can mean to stimulate interest or curiosity, or to irritate or provoke. Meriam Webster says "to excite or arouse especially by a provocation, challenge, or rebuff."
2807D558-3228-4FBA-967C-09E416FFAB0A.jpeg
 


Top