Replacing S1 switch to normal cts( noiseless pick up)

Fender nerd

Strat-Talk Member
Nov 7, 2020
74
Singapore
I would love to replace the current S1 switch from my fender strat to a cts volume pot.

But the noiseless pick up have 4 cables so i am not too sure how to solder the extra 2 cables.

Anyone had done the same thing?

1. Where/how do you solder each color to?

2. Is it better? Asking this as i got a feel the s1 switch is killing some sustain type of thing.


Thanks
 

Fender nerd

Strat-Talk Member
Nov 7, 2020
74
Singapore
Why? Doesn't the S1 with the switch NOT engaged act as any other volume knobbie? Sound more of a 'make work' project than anything.
I don't really need the 10 tones from the s1 switch, in facts more of the time i only use 1, 2, 4 and 5. Engaging the push knob, most of the tone are almost unusable for me.
 

ThreeChordWonder

Senior Stratmaster
Dec 2, 2020
3,434
Cypress TX
What do want to achieve with the pickups and switch positions? What kind of switch do you have? Regular 5-way or a Superswitch?

Noiseless pickups are basically humbuckers, so your four wires represent the ends of the two coils: two coils, two wires per coil, four wires. Usually plus a bare baseplate ground.

If you don't want to do coil splits, just figure out which wires are the "middles", solder them to each other and insulate then ends. Then you'll just have a hot, a ground, and the bare wire baseplate ground to deal with. The bare ALWAYS goes to ground on a pot casing, never via a switch, BTW.

You can use the push-pull to add the neck to the bridge, and by extension, bridge plus middle, and keep two tones, or you can convert to a Tele style single volume, single tone arrangement, and use the second tone as a blender volume for the neck.
 

Scott Baxendale

Most Honored Senior Member
Gold Supporting Member
May 20, 2020
5,236
Athens Ga
I would love to replace the current S1 switch from my fender strat to a cts volume pot.

But the noiseless pick up have 4 cables so i am not too sure how to solder the extra 2 cables.

Anyone had done the same thing?

1. Where/how do you solder each color to?

2. Is it better? Asking this as i got a feel the s1 switch is killing some sustain type of thing.


Thanks
I’ve got a box of useless S-1 switches. It’s better without.
 

StratUp

Most Honored Senior Member
Sep 5, 2020
7,452
Altered States
It's going to be a bit of work to make this happen. There are pitfalls but nothing irreversible. I don't know if it's worth the trouble. But that's up to you to decide.

Like @ThreeChordWonder Said, each pick up is two coils. They are usually referred to as north and south. There will be a north start and a north end. They'll also be a south start and a south end. The north finish will connect to the south start since the coils are in series. However, with the S1 switch in there to split those coils, there are going to be additional connections and it's not going to be as clear.

You need to keep track of which is which. Take lots of photos before you start showing all of the wires and what they connect to clearly. Try to you find a Fender wiring diagram with color codes. I'd Google for one that uses the S1switch. Figure out what the north start and south finish wires are. Then find a standard fender wiring diagram and wire them as normal single coils.

Hopefully someone here knows the colors or has a reference they can give you to back up the work.
 

T-Model

Strat-Talker
Feb 4, 2022
118
USA
5 choices is already a lot. 10 is rediculous. I pulled the S-1 out of my Deluxe immediately after getting it. Assuming you have basic modding experience just pull the entire volume pot with all the crap on it and put a new pot in.

For resale value it might even help to not have it.

10 choices just encourages fiddling, while simultaneously discouraging actual engaged practice.
 

ThreeChordWonder

Senior Stratmaster
Dec 2, 2020
3,434
Cypress TX
The north finish will connect to the south start since the coils are in series.
No!!!!

The coils need to be connected start to start or finish to finish so that they are reverse wound (or, more accurately, wired) relative to each other. The reversed polarities caused by being on either the north pole side or the south pole side of the magnet then brings the two coils back into phase.

If you connect the coils start to finish, what you'll do is not only defeat the hum canceling effect, but also put them out of phase and make the "antenna" twice as long.
 

Fender nerd

Strat-Talk Member
Nov 7, 2020
74
Singapore
Regular 5-way or a Superswitch?

. The bare ALWAYS goes to ground on a pot casing, never via a switch, BTW.
I just compare a regular switch vs superswitch from google. I think my is regular 5 way switch. I just want my strat to function like a normal 5 tonal strat.

While the noiseless pickup does sounds good. I think there are something about it that affect the overall playability. I know it sounds crazy but that just it. My fender player strat, although half the price, seems more responsive...i hope i know what i m talking about...
 
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Fender nerd

Strat-Talk Member
Nov 7, 2020
74
Singapore
No!!!!

The coils need to be connected start to start or finish to finish so that they are reverse wound (or, more accurately, wired) relative to each other. The reversed polarities caused by being on either the north pole side or the south pole side of the magnet then brings the two coils back into phase.

If you connect the coils start to finish, what you'll do is not only defeat the hum canceling effect, but also put them out of phase and make the "antenna" twice as long.
Will try to figure out this on my next string change.👍
 

ThreeChordWonder

Senior Stratmaster
Dec 2, 2020
3,434
Cypress TX
Remember most humbuckers have one magnet in their bases. The poles of the magnets are along the long edges of the magnets, not at the short ends like the magnets you might be used to from school days. One set of humbucker pole pieces are on the "south" side of the magnet and are thus polarized "south", the others are on the "north" side and thus polarized "north".

A humbucker cancels hum because each coil is wound, or more usually wired, in the opposite direction to the other. The direction, or more accurately the phase, of stray currents or noise from things like flourescent lights induced into the coils depend on the winding or wiring direction of the coil. The magnetic fields from the pickup magnet have no effect. Because the two coils in the humbucker are reverse wired, the signals induced in each coil are 180 degrees out of phase and so cancel each other out. Thats why it's important to wire the coils start to start or finish to finish.

The phase of the signal induced by the vibration of the string inside the magnetic field depends both on the winding (more usually the wiring) direction of the coil and the polarity of the magnetic field. Reverse the field and you reverse the phase. Reverse the polarity and you reverse the phase again, bringing it back into phase. If that second coil was in a separate pickup it would be called "RWRP" meaning reverse wound (wired) reverse polarity.
 


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