Restring style?...

StratLuv

Strat-Talker
Apr 7, 2015
251
N/A
Hi guys - Im looking into new ways of stringing up and came across some pics of Eric Johnsons own strat. Ive always put the string in the post first, the logical way on Kluson pegs, and then finished up by winding two pegs length worth of string to the bottom of each peg. Can anyone work out exactly what EJ is doing here with his "Over-Under" technique of stringing up?
 

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Vindibona1

Most Honored Senior Member
It's a locking technique. Why he does this with vintage tuners escapes me. The vintage tuners provide are self locking by design. I guess it's like wearing a belt and suspenders together to keep your pants from falling down. FWIW, I use Frudua's locking technique on all but my locking tuners. Necessary? I dunno. I do it mostly because that's the way I've always done it and it just works. We all have our quirks.

Skip to around 4:20 in the video.

 

Stratoskater

Fuzz Meister General
Feb 8, 2011
11,160
Naked in NC
Oh and it appears EJ is not putting the string down the tuner shaft and is instead running it through the "trench" and using over under to cinch it down to the tuner post. Never seen that in 25 years of playing.
 

StratLuv

Strat-Talker
Apr 7, 2015
251
N/A
Oh and it appears EJ is not putting the string down the tuner shaft and is instead running it through the "trench" and using over under to cinch it down to the tuner post. Never seen that in 25 years of playing.

Do you think that the string is being fed through the shaft after the winds? or first, and then over and under after? hard to tell
 

heltershelton

Vivamus libero Vivamus duris
Jun 5, 2013
31,795
Texas
It's a locking technique. Why he does this with vintage tuners escapes me. The vintage tuners provide are self locking by design. I guess it's like wearing a belt and suspenders together to keep your pants from falling down. FWIW, I use Frudua's locking technique on all but my locking tuners. Necessary? I dunno. I do it mostly because that's the way I've always done it and it just works. We all have our quirks.

Skip to around 4:20 in the video.


i just changed strings using this method....works well.
 

simoncroft

Still playing. Still learning!
Silver Member
May 30, 2013
19,412
SE England
Oddly enough, I was going to post this question when I changed a set of strings a couple of days ago. I've always put 2-3 winds round the post, but is there any science to this? For instance, I have a couple of guitars that came with locking tuners (wouldn't fit them myself). What is the difference between pulling the string tight, locking and bringing to pitch – with almost no wind on the post – compared to the way most of us have done it?

Come on the physicists among us! Is the pull on the tuner post distributed more evenly with a few winds? Is there a reason that would account for the string holding a more stable pitch if there are 2-3 winds?

On unwound strings, I always put them through the hole in the post twice, which is why I don't have any great need for locking tuners. Believe me, those strings are locked. Some people don't bother. Again, I'm not sure whether there is any science to my stringing customs. I'm genuinely curious.
 

jaybones

Dr. Stratster
Mar 17, 2014
10,452
Kelleys Island, Ohio
Nope, I do split shaft the Fender method. Trim string at two tuners past the one you are using. Bend string 90 degrees, insert in hole, wind going down the post. Make sure I have 2-3 wraps except G where I use 4-6 for more pressure, stretch, retune and away I go.

^^^THIIS^^^

And from the last pic, it looks like the unwound string is wrapped around the post many more times than necessary. Break angle or not, I don't think that many is needed for tuning stability or otherwise.

On acoustics, I have seen, and used the technique in the past where an over hand knot was made (like the first part of the shoelace knot) with the loose end going under the string on the guitar. Then when the tuner is tightened, the loose end gets locked under the string.

After using this technique for a while, and not noticing any benefit to tuning stability I decided it wasn't worth the extra trouble. I do use it when stringing my classical, seems to be the correct way for that guitar.
 

Chief101

Senior Stratmaster
Jan 14, 2012
1,188
Kentucky
I think Bonamassa's guitar tech, Mike Hickey, uses the same over/under technique. He says it's stable for tuning and fast to restring.
 

Highwaystrat

Senior Stratmaster
Mar 30, 2013
2,471
California
There's another way to lock split shaft tuners, you cut the string and insert in shaft hole as usual, but the first wrap goes around only one of the shaft sides, then the next wraps go around the whole shaft.

Ya I think these guys string their guitars these ways for faster string changes for performance situations, like stretching the strings a lot. If the strings are going to be on there for a while then you don't have to stretch the strings that much. They stretch them a lot so they stay in tune immediately, but soon the string will loose elastic property. I don't stretch the strings that much anymore. Unless I would have a gig.
 

jaybones

Dr. Stratster
Mar 17, 2014
10,452
Kelleys Island, Ohio
That is my understanding. On any other type of string, I think it's just a way to get another Merit Badge on your sleeve. :sneaky:

Simon, in the Boy Scouts of America we wear our merit badges on a sash. When I was in (Eagle Scout), I had close to 40 and there was no way I could have had that many on my sleeves.
 

Tone Guru

Senior Stratmaster
Dec 13, 2011
4,455
Music City TN
I use a double back on the plain strings.
Down into the hole to start like normal, then wind backwards 1/2 turn and back through the slot and around the correct way.

The way that is shown for Johnson defeats the purpose of the "safety post" with the cut end sticking out.
 

Stark

Still an idiot
Jul 16, 2011
14,918
Richmond Annex, CA
I cut 'em at approximately 3" past the shaft, give 'em the 90-degree Fezz bend, put the bent end into the slotted shaft hole, keep finger pressure on it and wrap 'em up about 3-4 times up the shaft. Neat, sorted.

:D
 


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