Should I return this EVH Wolfgang?

little_wing142

Senior Stratmaster
Jan 24, 2010
1,860
Piscataway, NJ
Hi , I just bought this brand new at GC and it looks like the nut is wonky. Can this be an easy fix or should I just return it? In the pic there is a gap on the bass side of the nut.
 

Attachments

  • 171BD55A-1479-4A07-B1A4-613CA1782884.jpeg
    171BD55A-1479-4A07-B1A4-613CA1782884.jpeg
    149 KB · Views: 92

tanta07

Senior Stratmaster
Feb 28, 2019
2,351
Colorado
Any issues with the playability? A poorly-cut nut reveals itself with notes fretting out and intonation problems.
 

Ebidis

Providing the world with flat bends since 1985
Nov 14, 2013
29,548
Alabama
Plays very well actually. No intonation issues I can find

The bass side of the nut has a gap compared to the treble side

From what I can see, there is not a gap on the bass side, there is extra wood on the treble side.

If you're OCD enough that it's gonna cause you to lose sleep, then return it (and hope and pray that the next one is better), otherwise, put away the magnifying glass and just play the darn thing.
 

Jimbo99

Senior Stratmaster
Jun 5, 2021
2,608
Palm Coast, FL
I see what you're saying, that the lock nut isn't perfectly centered. Does it hang over the Treble side edge of the fretboard ? Otherwise the string bar lookjs to be near perfect alignment. I'd take it back locally or if it was an online purchase, take better photos & at least get a better discount if it's misaligned & you can live with the flaw(s). They really can't do much for fixing that beyond plug & redrill the holes in the neck for the lock nut. That's gonna be near impossible to do without boogering up the neck underneath the locking nut.
 
Last edited:

retrobob

Strat-Talker
Aug 6, 2021
482
california
JMHO, what appears to be an off centered nut is a camera illusion.
As for the gap between the nut and the fretboard, that is usually an easy fix and not manufacturing error. The nut screws on this model are not bored through the neck, instead it is secured by two wood screws from the top under the locking clamps.
Usually the gap is caused by increased tension at back side of the nut where the strings go to the tuners, when the tremolo is dive bombed it increases the tension and sometimes moves the nut slightly backwards.
To fix it, remove the string locking clamps exposing the two flat head screws, loosen both screws slightly and lightly tap the nut back into position using a small block of wood and a small hammer. Once the nut is back in place tighten the two screws snugly (careful do not strip or break the screws, snug is all that's needed), tune the guitar, replace the and tighten string clamps, then use the fine tuners to finish tuning.
Here's the trick to minimizing this from happening again, slightly release the string tension at the tuners reducing the backwards pull when the tremolo is used, the locking clamps will keep the guitar in tune.
 

3bolt79

Dr. Stratster
Oct 16, 2018
14,886
Oregon
I would return it immediately, especially if that is an American one. But regardless of where it’s made, that is poorly crafted. I wouldn’t let them try to fix it. New guitar all the way.
 

3bolt79

Dr. Stratster
Oct 16, 2018
14,886
Oregon
JMHO, what appears to be an off centered nut is a camera illusion.
As for the gap between the nut and the fretboard, that is usually an easy fix and not manufacturing error. The nut screws on this model are not bored through the neck, instead it is secured by two wood screws from the top under the locking clamps.
Usually the gap is caused by increased tension at back side of the nut where the strings go to the tuners, when the tremolo is dive bombed it increases the tension and sometimes moves the nut slightly backwards.
To fix it, remove the string locking clamps exposing the two flat head screws, loosen both screws slightly and lightly tap the nut back into position using a small block of wood and a small hammer. Once the nut is back in place tighten the two screws snugly (careful do not strip or break the screws, snug is all that's needed), tune the guitar, replace the and tighten string clamps, then use the fine tuners to finish tuning.
Here's the trick to minimizing this from happening again, slightly release the string tension at the tuners reducing the backwards pull when the tremolo is used, the locking clamps will keep the guitar in tune.

‘The screws that hold the nut to the neck are very soft. Remove them carefully, and when you put the nut back on, use new screws as they are a one shot deal and break easily. Ask me how I know:sneaky:
 

little_wing142

Senior Stratmaster
Jan 24, 2010
1,860
Piscataway, NJ
JMHO, what appears to be an off centered nut is a camera illusion.
As for the gap between the nut and the fretboard, that is usually an easy fix and not manufacturing error. The nut screws on this model are not bored through the neck, instead it is secured by two wood screws from the top under the locking clamps.
Usually the gap is caused by increased tension at back side of the nut where the strings go to the tuners, when the tremolo is dive bombed it increases the tension and sometimes moves the nut slightly backwards.
To fix it, remove the string locking clamps exposing the two flat head screws, loosen both screws slightly and lightly tap the nut back into position using a small block of wood and a small hammer. Once the nut is back in place tighten the two screws snugly (careful do not strip or break the screws, snug is all that's needed), tune the guitar, replace the and tighten string clamps, then use the fine tuners to finish tuning.
Here's the trick to minimizing this from happening again, slightly release the string tension at the tuners reducing the backwards pull when the tremolo is used, the locking clamps will keep the guitar in tune.
Hello,

there are actually 2 screws that go from the nut and are bolted and countersunk on the back of the neck. It seems pretty solid in there. I'm not sure if it can move or be repositioned.
 

retrobob

Strat-Talker
Aug 6, 2021
482
california
Same process will work, however it's a lot less likely to reoccur with the through bolts. It's a 5 minute procedure, that leaves no marks or damage. If it doesn't work, send it back, you got nothing to loose.
With the through bolts, it can be easier to do by leaving the string locks tight, then slightly loosening the back screws and releasing the tension at the tuners, usually the string tension on the floyd side pulls the nut back into place. Tighten the back screws and done.
 
Last edited:

little_wing142

Senior Stratmaster
Jan 24, 2010
1,860
Piscataway, NJ
Same process will work, however it's a lot less likely to reoccur with the through bolts. It's a 5 minute procedure, that leaves no marks or damage. If it doesn't work, send it back, you got nothing to loose.
With the through bolts, it can be easier to do by leaving the string locks tight, then slightly loosening the back screws and releasing the tension at the tuners, usually the string tension on the floyd side pulls the nut back into place. Tighten the back screws and done.
Thank you I will try this. I just got it so definitely I have 45 days
 

StratUp

Most Honored Senior Member
Sep 5, 2020
9,008
Altered States
I see at least one, maybe two issues, from the same source.

1. As @Ebidis pointed out, there's an extra bump of wood for about 3/16" on the treble side.
2. Either the slot/end is cut on an angle or the nut isn't aligned properly.

My guess is that it was loose in the CNC machine while cutting and both are true: it was cutting at a slight angle and then it jiggled a bit more and left a hump at the end. But it could just be the second part.

Return it. It's a new guitar. It should be correct. You might be able to correct the angle by adjusting... assuming it's not actually cut at an angle. But you can't fix the right side without a file. And that's definitely not something you should be doing on a new guitar. Like @3bolt79 said, don't let them "fix" it.
 


Top