Sociopath Next Door ... The Saga Ccontinues

rolandson

Dr. Stratster
Original foil still over the cork. Getting drunk grade single malt.

16 year old Lagavulin was my poison of choice.
And I understand it also works well at removing automotive paint...! šŸ™ƒ

I like Oban but, before meds necessitated discontinued use of alcohol, I had ventured to Japanese single malts. Hard to come by here, and when found will generally run a couple hundred per bottle ($50 in Tokyo, go figure)...
But if the opportunity arises, Yamazaki is outstanding, Hibiki Harmony is an unbelievable blended, and at $40 per, Toki will stand along side The Balvenie 15.
 

Bowmap

I nose a thang or two.
Platinum Supporting Member
Dec 23, 2017
13,112
Third Door Down
Is McCallum any good? I am not a scotch drinker but a old friend offered me a glass and I found it drinkable.
 

Clickitysplit

Strat-O-Master
May 25, 2021
676
Temecula, CA
Does the property line violation complicate anything with regard to the sale? Is there a way to put some sort of lien on her place? I would seriously hesitate to buy a place knowing it comes with that sort of baggage.
 

rolandson

Dr. Stratster
Is McCallum any good? I am not a scotch drinker but a old friend offered me a glass and I found it drinkable.
Yes, it is.

Each Scotch is unique, as is each person sampling it. While one will curl the toenails of someone, another might find it nectar of heaven.

The blends (created, I understand to imply uniformity in taste across multiple distillations...) offer more a consistent flavor. And shouldn't be considered "cheap"... Johnny Walker Blue is a rather expensive blended at nearly $300 per bottle.

Some of these run into the thousands of dollars per bottle, but that doesn't make them good. Just expensive. Good is in the beholder and thus if you enjoy it, it's good!
 

rolandson

Dr. Stratster
Does the property line violation complicate anything with regard to the sale? Is there a way to put some sort of lien on her place? I would seriously hesitate to buy a place knowing it comes with that sort of baggage.
No, maybe...not really. ??

The violation is in several parts. There was the theft part, and then there is the landslide part.
The landslide part, she has to disclose that to any potential buyer. If she doesn't ...the buyer has to get in line.

But...the only way to put a lien is to file suit.

I want the criminal elements dealt with before I do that.

I do not know if she shared any of what is happening with her agent. That is about to change. Our counsel is formally notifying the selling agent of the landslide thing tomorrow.

So, play a role with me.
You.
You looked at this house.
You liked it.
Now...imagine you are interested in buying this house but...
You unexpectedly learn that oh yes, there's this small, matter of a landslide
and it is likely that it is going to involve excavators snd dump trucks and large rocks and concrete walls and,
that new patio and outdoor room...yes, that'll need to be dug up.

How do you think that might affect your offer?

Then, there is the matter of gunfire inside the home shortly following the arrival of ms. sociopath's convicted murderer son from his prison sentence in California.

The local police are more than a little bit interested in that. Nobody but the 'pathic family has any idea what that is all about. But if the locals get just cause, they'll dismantle the walls inside looking for any sort of evidence.

How is that offer looking now?

This is ugly beyond imagination.
 
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ThreeChordWonder

Senior Stratmaster
Dec 2, 2020
4,612
Cypress TX
Blends were created first and foremost to enable cheap grain whisky to be mixed with the more expensive malts. Andrew Usher is credited with this, Edinburgh, 1860.

Blends also impart a uniform flavor, strength and hue. It is also said they don't cloud the water if added. If the water added to a single malt was from a different region it was said, although I've never actually seen it happen, it could or would cloud the water with limescale.

I was told, although someone might have been taking the Budweiser, that in years gone by the pubs would even sell bottles of water from the same distillery as the malt to stop this.

In the thirteen years or so I lived in Aberdeenshire, Scotland, I sampled virtually all of the mainstream malts and quite a few rarities. The owner of the hotel in the village I lived in bought the place when the old alchie who had owned it died. The old achie had been in the habit of stashing opened, and therefore valueless, malts all over the hotel so his wife wouldn't find them. As Jim modernized the hotel he kept finding the bottles and would sell the scotch or give it away over the bar.
 

Strat Jacket

Senior Stratmaster
May 11, 2018
3,060
Illinois
Yes, but...complications to the sale...will they leave you with:
a) unsellable house, getting run down by the day, open season for squatters and furry critters, some that may smell really bad by the day?
b) property tied up in legal red tape that still belongs to the problem child who can move back in at her whim?
Just asking, not trying to rain on your parade. Similar situation happened here with the house behind us. It stood vacant for almost 5 years. Lawn looked like a cornfield, skunks took up residence in the garage (and sprayed my dog), power was cut and basement flooded every time it rained with no sump pump. It was a train wreck.
 

dirocyn

Most Honored Senior Member
Jan 20, 2018
7,680
Murfreesboro, TN
No, maybe...not really. ??

The violation is in several parts. There was the theft part, and then there is the landslide part.
The landslide part, she has to disclose that to any potential buyer. If she doesn't ...the buyer has to get in line.

But...the only way to put a lien is to file suit.

I want the criminal elements delt with before I do that.

I do not know if she shared any of what is happening with her agent. That is about to change. Our counsel is formally notifying the selling agent of the landslide thing tomorrow.

So, play a role with me.
You.
You looked at this house.
You liked it.
Now...imagine you are interested in buying this house but...
You unexpectedly learn that oh yes, there's this small, matter of a landslide
and it is likely that it is going to involve excavators snd dump trucks and large rocks and concrete walls and,
that new patio and outdoor room...yes, that'll need to be dug up.

How do you think that might affect your offer?

Then, there is the matter of gunfire inside the home shortly following the arrival of ms. sociopath's convicted murderer son from his prison sentence in California.

The local police are more than a little bit interested in that. Nobody but the 'pathic family has any idea what that is all about. But if the locals get just cause, they'll dismantle the walls inside looking for any sort of evidence.

How is that offer looking now?

This is ugly beyond imagination.
Would it be worthwhile to put up some sort of marker on the property line? Perhaps some bright orange construction ribbon? Might also lead prospective buyers to ask more questions.
 

Clickitysplit

Strat-O-Master
May 25, 2021
676
Temecula, CA
No, maybe...not really. ??

The violation is in several parts. There was the theft part, and then there is the landslide part.
The landslide part, she has to disclose that to any potential buyer. If she doesn't ...the buyer has to get in line.

But...the only way to put a lien is to file suit.

I want the criminal elements delt with before I do that.

I do not know if she shared any of what is happening with her agent. That is about to change. Our counsel is formally notifying the selling agent of the landslide thing tomorrow.

So, play a role with me.
You.
You looked at this house.
You liked it.
Now...imagine you are interested in buying this house but...
You unexpectedly learn that oh yes, there's this small, matter of a landslide
and it is likely that it is going to involve excavators snd dump trucks and large rocks and concrete walls and,
that new patio and outdoor room...yes, that'll need to be dug up.

How do you think that might affect your offer?

Then, there is the matter of gunfire inside the home shortly following the arrival of ms. sociopath's convicted murderer son from his prison sentence in California.

The local police are more than a little bit interested in that. Nobody but the 'pathic family has any idea what that is all about. But if the locals get just cause, they'll dismantle the walls inside looking for any sort of evidence.

How is that offer looking now?

This is ugly beyond imagination.
If I were a truly interested buyer the seller would rectify the property line problem completely by restoring to the prior state or by reducing the asking price to enable me to do it.

And that assumes local law enforcement gets what it needs on the weapons violations and is out of the picture.

The mess these subcreatures have made is absolutely epic in proportion.

Hereā€™s to getting the justice you deserve! šŸ„ƒ
 

rolandson

Dr. Stratster
Would it be worthwhile to put up some sort of marker on the property line? Perhaps some bright orange construction ribbon? Might also lead prospective buyers to ask more questions.


God I hope so...

I shelled out $4500 for a proper, recorded, survey last fall. The line is staked with tall white rods flying magenta and blue ribbons...
No mistaking it!

Utility location marks are all over the place.

The tree that gave first indication of landslide is tied off with blue ropes and flagged warning stakes.

The next order of business are the engineering studies...
Rods at varying depths with the angles registered to gauge degree of movement. The price tag for this is going to choke a whale.

The road that will provide access to the area for the heavy equipment gets marked with red flags tomorrow. I simply have no idea how much all of this is going to cost. Probably more than I have. It's going to be $2700 to bring down an old growrth evergreen. Trying to sell to a lumber company but they aren't interested. The insured value is $30,000.

If a prospective buyer doesn't get the sense that something is ...happening, I am afraid that they are simply not paying attention.

Both spouse and I have been versed on our responses if someone should ask anything...

"If considering purchasing, you would be wise to consult a geotechnical engineer and an attorney. I am prohibited from commenting further, sorry"
 

PonyB

Most Honored Senior Member
Nov 3, 2020
5,057
above ground
F*k, if this crap doesn't resolve soon, I'm gonna tell the physicians and nurses and threapists to stuff it, go back to Japan, buy a bottle of Yamazaki, sit on my patio and get sh!tfaced.

Except it's really spouse's patio, her family home, and my passport expired.
Sitting on the curb with a handle of Mad Dog may be your only option.
 

dirocyn

Most Honored Senior Member
Jan 20, 2018
7,680
Murfreesboro, TN
God I hope so...

I shelled out $4500 for a proper, recorded, survey last fall. The line is staked with tall white rods flying magenta and blue ribbons...
No mistaking it!

Utility location marks are all over the place.

The tree that gave first indication of landslide is tied off with blue ropes and flagged warning stakes.

The next order of business are the engineering studies...
Rods at varying depths with the angles registered to gauge degree of movement. The price tag for this is going to choke a whale.

The road that will provide access to the area for the heavy equipment gets marked with red flags tomorrow. I simply have no idea how much all of this is going to cost. Probably more than I have. It's going to be $2700 to bring down an old growrth evergreen. Trying to sell to a lumber company but they aren't interested. The insured value is $30,000.

If a prospective buyer doesn't get the sense that something is ...happening, I am afraid that they are simply not paying attention.

Both spouse and I have been versed on our responses if someone should ask anything...

"If considering purchasing, you would be wise to consult a geotechnical engineer and an attorney. I am prohibited from commenting further, sorry"
Sheesh, this is worse than I realized. I would weigh carefully your decision to delay suing until after an indictment. If her insurance won't defend her criminal actions, it won't pay the claim either. You could find yourself with a large judgment that you can't collect.
 

abnormaltoy

Mouth draggin' knuckle breather
Apr 28, 2013
23,869
Tucson
Good morning.

As I read the opening post in this thread, I thought to myself..."Mark, you might have missed details on this particular story"...

All I can say is, it is so good that I live a life that's virtually drama free.

Well, I guess there's more I can say... I'm sorry you have to go through this, and take notes.
 

rolandson

Dr. Stratster
Sheesh, this is worse than I realized. I would weigh carefully your decision to delay suing until after an indictment. If her insurance won't defend her criminal actions, it won't pay the claim either. You could find yourself with a large judgment that you can't collect.
And therein lies the rub...
I initiate now, I am funding an action out of pocket against an insurance company funded lawyer who will bury me in paper at $400 per hour.

That is $70k to $150k out of pocket should it go to trial.

Sociopath has no incentive to settle. It isnā€™t costing her a dime.

And then there is the appeal.

Fun Fact:
While being awarded attorney's fees for the trial portion is a certainty. Being awarded attorney's fees for the Appeal isn't going to happen.

I would most certainly prevail on appeal too, but getting awarded fees for that part is nearly impossible.
 

dirocyn

Most Honored Senior Member
Jan 20, 2018
7,680
Murfreesboro, TN
And therein lies the rub...
I initiate now, I am funding an action out of pocket against an insurance company funded lawyer who will bury me in paper at $400 per hour.

That is $70k to $150k out of pocket should it go to trial.

Sociopath has no incentive to settle. It isnā€™t costing her a dime.

And then there is the appeal.

Fun Fact:
While being awarded attorney's fees for the trial portion is a certainty. Being awarded attorney's fees for the Appeal isn't going to happen.

I would most certainly prevail on appeal too, but getting awarded fees for that part is nearly impossible.

If the insurance company is going to pay for the damage, Sociopath has no incentive not to settle. It's not coming out of her pocket. Of course the insurance company will raise every defense they think is valid, in order to avoid paying.

If Sociopath is in prison, she also has no incentive to settle. She's not likely to bury you in paper, but she's also not likely to respond to your discovery requests or expedite the case. Meetings with lawyers and court appearances become a break in the drudgery of being incarcerated. And then if you win, does she have a deep enough pocket to pay the judgment? Bear in mind, she will also be paying a criminal defense attorney and may blow through any liquid assets pretty quickly.

The timelines are important. If you litigate now, but she gets indicted before your civil case goes to trial--does that change whether the insurance company continues defending her; does it change whether they pay the claim?

Of course, the worst possible situation would be if the property sells and she disappears with the money before your suit is filed.
 

rolandson

Dr. Stratster
If the insurance company is going to pay for the damage, Sociopath has no incentive not to settle. It's not coming out of her pocket. Of course the insurance company will raise every defense they think is valid, in order to avoid paying.

If Sociopath is in prison, she also has no incentive to settle. She's not likely to bury you in paper, but she's also not likely to respond to your discovery requests or expedite the case. Meetings with lawyers and court appearances become a break in the drudgery of being incarcerated. And then if you win, does she have a deep enough pocket to pay the judgment? Bear in mind, she will also be paying a criminal defense attorney and may blow through any liquid assets pretty quickly.

The timelines are important. If you litigate now, but she gets indicted before your civil case goes to trial--does that change whether the insurance company continues defending her; does it change whether they pay the claim?

Of course, the worst possible situation would be if the property sells and she disappears with the money before your suit is filed.
And this is why I have an attorney! I am not litigation happy. I think the advice to avoid it unless absolutely necessary is solid.

And we've still a few tricks.

The big one of course is the marking of the access. A buyer is certain to wonder what that is all about. And once learning the reason, may well reconsider. Which provides incentive to sociopath.

It's one thing if we were seeking $. But we're not. We're seeking to be restored.
 


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