Steel string acoustic that handles like a Strat?

MagnusR

Senior Stratmaster
Feb 21, 2013
1,067
Sweden
Is there such a thing?
I've tried a few but they are very hard/heavy to play fast runs on

When listening to this one i suspect he has one that at least is easier than a "standard" one
 
Last edited:

Guitarmageddon

Dr. Stratster
Apr 19, 2014
27,148
Canada
Is there such a thing?
I've tried a few but they are very hard/heavy to play fast runs on

When listening to this one i supect he has one that at least is easier than a "standard" one


Isn't that a nylon string acoustic electric.....like a classical sound? Ritchie anyway, not the other guy.....

I've never seen a guitar with steel strings and that kind of open headstock with the classical style tuners.....
 

MagnusR

Senior Stratmaster
Feb 21, 2013
1,067
Sweden
Isn't that a nylon string acoustic electric.....like a classical sound? Ritchie anyway, not the other guy.....

I've never seen a guitar with steel strings and that kind of open headstock with the classical style tuners.....
Sounds like steel to me but I could be wrong
 

FrieAsABird

Senior Stratmaster
Mar 18, 2020
2,984
Germany
I mean Fender has been producing Acoustic guitars for decades and some of them, like the Acoustasonic, are supposed to play very similarly to a electric guitar
 

nickmsmith

Dr. Stratster
Jul 28, 2011
14,192
USA
The string gauge is the biggest difference for me. If you put 9s or 10s on a thinner bodied acoustic with a cutaway, that’s about as good as it gets as far as ease of playing. But you sacrifice other things when you get the easier handling/playing.

Bigger body will give a fuller sound, and so will 11s or 12s on acoustic.

But as always, it’s the notes that you play, that really matter.
 

MagnusR

Senior Stratmaster
Feb 21, 2013
1,067
Sweden
The string gauge is the biggest difference for me. If you put 9s or 10s on a thinner bodied acoustic with a cutaway, that’s about as good as it gets as far as ease of playing. But you sacrifice other things when you get the easier handling/playing.

Bigger body will give a fuller sound, and so will 11s or 12s on acoustic.

But as always, it’s the notes that you play, that really matter.
I think you are on to something.
I play 9 gauges on my Strats and changing to 10 is a disaster for me.
Perhaps the standard on an acoustic is 10 or 11?
 

Bob Spumoni

Senior Stratmaster
May 5, 2019
1,886
New England
I'm inclined to think there's no reason why an acoustic can't be set up to play nicely, certainly with lighter strings, but I do agree that generally makers/sellers get lazy setting up acoustics (Strats in particular ARE easier to set up, though, than any acoustic: all you need to "reset the neck" is a matchbook cover and a screwdriver: no artisanal fiddling required). My jazz guitars, which are hollowbodies (acoustics with pickups, nearly), have action at a decent height. They're a little stiffer, but that's b/c of heavier flatwounds, but the action is only slightly higher than many of my electrics. Maybe it goes back to the days when everybody played acoustics banging away at "Micah Row the Boat Ashore" down at the d----d hootenanny, and needed that quarter-inch of action to get the requisite folky thump which so impressed chicks with ironed hair, but who bothers with that stuff any more (the thumping, not the girls)? I rarely play acoustics any more anyway: not enough knobs. I love knobs. I use 10's on my electrics, 11's on the guitars wearing flatwounds.
 

dirocyn

Most Honored Senior Member
Jan 20, 2018
6,571
Murfreesboro, TN
Most steel string acoustics come stock with 12s, these days. "Medium" acoustic strings means 13s.

That guitar sounds like nylon strings to me, looks like it too. Nylons through an undersaddle piezo. I've got a set of D'Addario EJ45 classical strings here on my desk, 85.85 lbs tension for the set. That's real close to the same tension you'll find in a set of 9s.

An acoustic guitar gets its volume from the weight of the strings driving the soundboard. Lighter strings will mean softer volume, and the timbre may change somewhat as well. Maybe in ways you like, who knows?

There is absolutely no reason you can't set up an acoustic for lighter strings. You probably can't go lighter than 10s if you want to keep the wound G string. If you care about intonation, switching from a wound G to a plain one will require saddle adjustment.
 

J-Mart

Senior Stratmaster
Jul 17, 2020
1,142
Tx
Touchy issue with this and my acoustic player/singer. He was one of those acoustic guitar purists, who never touched anything that had less than 12s on it. He would play for a set and his hands hurt, blah, blah, blah. One day I put some 11s on the guitar and adjusted the relief. Now he plays faster and longer with the lighter gauge. I always told him, as my belief was, once you're plugged in, and electrified, let the Front of House give you the thickness the fat gauges provide. If you're unplugged, well that's different. Lol
 

J-Mart

Senior Stratmaster
Jul 17, 2020
1,142
Tx
Most steel string acoustics come stock with 12s, these days. "Medium" acoustic strings means 13s.

That guitar sounds like nylon strings to me, looks like it too. Nylons through an undersaddle piezo. I've got a set of D'Addario EJ45 classical strings here on my desk, 85.85 lbs tension for the set. That's real close to the same tension you'll find in a set of 9s.

An acoustic guitar gets its volume from the weight of the strings driving the soundboard. Lighter strings will mean softer volume, and the timbre may change somewhat as well. Maybe in ways you like, who knows?

There is absolutely no reason you can't set up an acoustic for lighter strings. You probably can't go lighter than 10s if you want to keep the wound G string. If you care about intonation, switching from a wound G to a plain one will require saddle adjustment.
This^^^ 10-50s and a double compensated saddle will get you there.
 

dirocyn

Most Honored Senior Member
Jan 20, 2018
6,571
Murfreesboro, TN
Can anybody ID that guitar? It looks a lot like an Alvarez-Yairi Ritchie Blackmore signature--except that guitar has steel-string type headstock & tuners.

It's an unusual layout, with F holes on a flat top and a cutaway. Cool guitar.
 

nickmsmith

Dr. Stratster
Jul 28, 2011
14,192
USA
I think you are on to something.
I play 9 gauges on my Strats and changing to 10 is a disaster for me.
Perhaps the standard on an acoustic is 10 or 11?
Yep 10s or 11s on acoustic would be considered light.

A well set up acoustic should play about as easily as an electric with the same gauge strings.
 


Top