Strat talk and rap/hip hop

Status
Not open for further replies.

nifnof70

Strat-O-Master
Feb 8, 2017
917
Harpers Ferry WV
There once was a Strat-talk post on rap.

It started a Beatbox avalanche of crap.

Anger, amusement, feelings of woe

Can’t we just stick to bashing John Mayer and Joe (Bonamassa)?
 

crankmeister

Most Honored Senior Member
Jul 9, 2020
6,016
Republic of Gilead
I'll give you one guess as to what it does have to do with...
I love hip-hop. I love musicology, too. I think there's more to it than whatever low-hanging fruit you might have in mind.

Perhaps, for example, what's accepted as improv differs from one to another. Jazz and hip-hop are the most individual and improvisational genres in the western world. They are meant to be such. Rock music is much more rigid. Blues less so than rock, but still is much more predictable than jazz or hip-hop; is doesn't modulate or embellish its chords like jazz and hip-hop do. Frankly, musicologically, the stodgier ST audience (and the societal crossection that it ostensibly is) doesn't really celebrate the individual. They are socio-cultural traditionalists, and both the content and the form of the music reflects it.

We're dealing with a genre that emphasizes complex, multitextured percussion and body movement, on the one hand, versus melody on the other. One thrives on things like syncopation and polyphony, the other on structure and predictability. One is a dialogue, the other's a monologue.

One celebrates lyrical playfulness, life stories, and swag (including self-deprecating swag, e.g. Phife Dawg, the funky diabetic). Hip-hop is an ongoing challenge and show of wit and quick-thinking. The other is usually too structured to be any more playful than the script allows.

So, even if someone is ambivalent-to-fine with the lyrical content of hip-hop artists, there are formal dynamics to consider.

But there are basic reasons the British colonizers banned certain types of percussion among the colonized. And there's a reason Sam Phillips said he needed a white face to put on that black sound . . . the same reason Brazilians took Samba and made it Bossa Nova (a similar process happened all over the Caribbean region with Merengue, Rhumba, etc).

Percussion stirs the passions.

A typical "guitar player" role is somewhere between sidelined and lost in all this.
 

crankmeister

Most Honored Senior Member
Jul 9, 2020
6,016
Republic of Gilead
If someone that knows nothing about Hair Metal were to claim it is less than music and to misrepresent it in a negative way, you might suggest they don't know what they're talking aboot.
If going against the pack at strat-talk makes me seem "superior", I don't think the problem is on my end. Is it my snooty accent?
I attended a small Midwestern college for a semester, ca. 1998. The college dean included in his monthly newsletter the statement, "Rap is to music what etch-a-sketch is to art".
 

crankmeister

Most Honored Senior Member
Jul 9, 2020
6,016
Republic of Gilead
I agree with you 100%, and enjoy lots of old rap and I'm sure there is some really mind blowing music being made today.

Unfortunately I don't seek it out, and my only exposure is through the car thing, and that style doesn't make me want to hear any more. Maybe that's a whole different sub genre, and I shouldn't let it influence me. But, there you go.
I find good stuff coming out of the UK.

I probably think it's good because it sounds more like what I came up listening to.

Coops, The Mouse Outfit, Ocean Wisdom I think are fantastic. There's more, but that's all I can think of off the cuff.
 

StratoMutt

Dr. Stratster
Mar 15, 2019
11,371
SE Pennsylvania
I simply do not like rap, hip hop and the like. I do not consider a DJ LP turntable a musical instrument.

Guitars, bass guitar, keyboards maybe and acoustic drums. A vocalist is OK and optional.

My musical mind is stuck in 60s / 70s guitar oriented rock for the most part. Some great rock in the 90s too.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.


Top