Strat trems and the famous G-String

Discussion in 'Tech-Talk' started by cyberglad, Mar 27, 2021.

  1. Andrew Wasson

    Andrew Wasson Senior Stratmaster

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    I rarely go all dive bombs and whammy crazy on mine because I haven’t figured out quite how to incorporate it into my playing but I’m always surprised at how well mine stays in tune when I do bust out the VH dive bomb shenanigans.

    It’s not often that I do that but I did a little Beatles birthday video for a buddies 50th and finished it with a little solo and dive bomb into an E7(#9) Hendrix chord to finish it off. I had to do it several times (because I screwed up the playing, the timing or the singing numerous times) but the guitar stayed in tune throughout. AND that’s with vintage split tuners, a bone nut, 6 screw Trem and an American Standard string tree.

    That it would return to pitch after being completely slackened and then returned is mind boggling without locking tuners and a roller nut but it does it. Most of the time I just give it a little wiggle to make the notes shimmer and it never goes out of tune.
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2021
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  2. bloomz

    bloomz Senior Stratmaster Silver Member

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    Because Fender vibratos are built by Mattell
     
  3. Afishman9

    Afishman9 Strat-Talk Member Gold Supporting Member

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    That is true. Improper setup of the bridge screws (too high or too low) can also do it, but few think of this. Of course, there are alsother variables that can hinder the string returning to pitch (springs, saddles, etc.)
     
  4. Afishman9

    Afishman9 Strat-Talk Member Gold Supporting Member

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    Maybe I missed it in the thread, but for setting up the trem and for floating one, Frudua's videos on YouTube will get things right. It will stay in tune.
     
  5. fezz parka

    fezz parka fezz parka

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    Mine stays in tune. The nut is cut well, the bridge is setup properly. The right amount of wraps on the post. No lube. None. :)
     
  6. GoldenHound

    GoldenHound New Member!

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    Agree, but will also add that the 6 screw holes in the bridge, must be perfectly aligned with the holes in the bridge. If any one of the screws is out of alignment, and bind on the tremolo bridge, this, of course will hamper string(s) returning to perfect tune.
    Thankfully, my 70's Strat has never had this problem.

    Luthiers all around the LA area would check, plug and re - drill the holes for perfect alignment in the 80's for about $60. When I asked one of them if it resolved the problem, his reply was, "Hundreds of satisfied customers". Haha!
     
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  7. 3bolt79

    3bolt79 Dr. Stratster

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    ‘I agree with you completely. The screws must be perfectly adjusted. That is probably a tall order for a lot of guitarist that don’t really work on their guitars themselves. For those guys that haven’t, but want to learn, I say go to Frudia on YouTube.
     
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  8. StratifyMe

    StratifyMe Strat-Talk Member

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    Oh. Ok I understand. Yah, that does make sense
     
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  9. Slartybartfast

    Slartybartfast Strat-Talker

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    Yes a well set up strat can be very reliable. I was one of the earliest Sperzel users in my area ('93) and I was surprised how they didn't really do anything but look ugly.
     
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  10. jzgtrguy

    jzgtrguy Strat-Talk Member

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    Using the piano as an example compared to what we have today if you looked at earlier models and what they sounded like each generation was an improvement over the last. I'll take a modern piano any day of the week unless the piece calls for specifically for Harpsicord. I've yet to play a compensated guitar either fanned fret or with compensated frets so I can't compare but other than fixing the intonation problem I bet they sound just fine.

    Having said that I do agree with you that a guitars tone is the some of dozens of little nuanced factors like, sting type and size, saddles, nut, pickups, pickup height wood types finger board wood fret metal etc, it all adds up and they each have a factor in the tone.
     
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  11. Scott Baxendale

    Scott Baxendale Senior Stratmaster Gold Supporting Member

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    A fanned fret guitar doesn’t have any better intonation than a conventional fretted guitar. On a fanned fret guitar each string has its own scale length and the lower strings have a longer scale than the higher strings. The reason some folks do this has to do with string tension, since the longer scale requires more tension to bring the same string to pitch. So with the wider frets and longer scale on the lower strings it gives the lower string more tension which in theory equals more sound. Ultimately it’s kind of a gimmick.
     
  12. Fenderbaum

    Fenderbaum Strat-Talker

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    I tried to tune my guitar like this guy does. Similar to Frudua. And it works..