Stratocaster Neck profile questions.

Discussion in 'Stratocaster Discussion Forum' started by Shockmaster, Dec 23, 2019.

  1. Shockmaster

    Shockmaster Strat-Talk Member Silver Member

    Age:
    31
    Messages:
    66
    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2018
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    Looking to buy a USA strat from zzounds.com (I have a return with them so I have credit, that’s why I’m forced with them for my purchase). Here’s my question. I understand that the radius is the curvature of the fretboard. And that a C neck is probably the more comfortable of the 3 shapes for me. I have smaller hands and wider fingers so I’m looking for something that’s “thin”. I know that’s a tired subject but there seems to me a lot of confusion in prior posts I’ve read on here. I played a 1966 Stratocaster and I had a 1986 Japanese strat. Both these necks were very comfortable for me to play, and seemed for “flat” and “thin” compared to modern necks. Almost smaller in a way. I’m wondering if there are any modern strats for sale in the up to $2000 range on zzsounds.com that would fit that similar neck feel. I’m looking for an S S S configuration. Any info on which modern strats have this neck feel is greatly appreciated. Thanks again.
     
    Jerseystratfiend likes this.
  2. StratPlus97

    StratPlus97 Senior Stratmaster

    Messages:
    1,549
    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2016
    Location:
    USA
    Why don’t you hit up a GC or any other Fender dealer shop and try them out. Way better then buying something you haven’t felt or played.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  3. wrvond

    wrvond Senior Stratmaster

    Age:
    64
    Messages:
    2,374
    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2011
    Location:
    West Virginia
    You might want to take a look at the Americn Elite. It has a modern C to D compound neck profile and an asymmetrical neck heel, so might feel thinner to you.
    The American Ultra has a modern D neck, which isn't as low profile as a modern C, but the radius is 10" to 14" (compound) which should feel pretty good to you. It also has the asymmetrical neck heel.
     
  4. jvin248

    jvin248 Senior Stratmaster

    Messages:
    4,071
    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2014
    Location:
    Michigan
    .

    Find a friend with an Indonesian Squier Strat to try that carve. They start carving at the leading edge of the fretboard and back. Spec sheets show half a mm width and depth change but there is a huge amount of wood carved off the rear shoulders. Then compare that to the MIM/MIA models.

    When I first started playing every forum was suggesting "thin and fast!" and I found later I got cramps playing cowboy chords on those and needed a full chunky neck to play easier. I have bigger hands but check as your style of fretting may cause a preference one way or another.

    .
     
    wrvond likes this.
  5. Miotch

    Miotch Senior Stratmaster

    Age:
    59
    Messages:
    4,140
    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2011
    Location:
    ok
    Don't know what exact model you'd find this on, but the '62 reissue neck I have is about the thinnest neck, of any guitar, I've played. I just bought the neck itself from Fender many moons ago.
     
  6. ido1957

    ido1957 Senior Stratmaster

    Messages:
    2,536
    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2014
    Location:
    Canada
    My all time favorite was a friend's 2014 American Deluxe with a compound radius neck.
    I have a 2015 Elite which is fine but not quite as comfy neck wise. But I ain't selling it lol.
    Have not tried the Ultra.
    I have an EC which is super nice (but needs frets). It is skinny and v-shaped and great for soloing.
     
  7. Tim S

    Tim S Strat-O-Master

    Messages:
    699
    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2015
    Location:
    NYS
    I have small hands (men’s small gloves) and it was luck one day when I tried a soft-v neck. I found it more comfortable than the modern-c necks I played for years.

    I’m not saying everyone with small hands need a soft-v neck. But I *am* saying not everyone with small hands need a thin neck. You really need to try a variety to figure out what works best for you. You might be surprised.