stratocaster nut

StoogeSurfer

Strat-O-Master
Jan 13, 2010
572
USA
Yes, it will adversely affect the value somewhat. Collectors like originality and this drives price.

In another thread, someone was contemplating buying a '62 AVRI neck and putting it on the body, while putting the original neck away, which I think is a good way to go.
 

56alder

Strat-Talker
Aug 7, 2010
104
san rafael, ca
If it's unplayable due to wear, it's value is already lowered by that fact. So restoring it (well) will not lower it any further than it already has been due to wear, at least to anyone who would be interested in actually playing it rather than just looking at it(!)
 

vibrasonic

Strat-Talker
Dec 26, 2011
423
canada
I had to replace the nut on my 63 . It was so worn it was starting to buzz.
I was going to keep the original but it crumbled when it came out . IT plays WAY better

Whats the use of having a nice guitar if its unplayable . Just my 2 cents.

Cheers
 

56alder

Strat-Talker
Aug 7, 2010
104
san rafael, ca
BTW original strat nuts are pretty easily restorable. If the issue is overworn slots, the slots and other wear can be filled in with dust sanded from a piece of bone, then a drop of superglue. That essentially creates new bone, which can be sanded and filed to a like-new configuration.
 

56alder

Strat-Talker
Aug 7, 2010
104
san rafael, ca
a marginal devaluation , between 5 and 10% of the market value.

Devaluation from the value in its unplayable condition?(!)

Of course, value depends on the buyer- a guitar with nut and frets worn enough to cause playability issues will be likely to have other wear issues (finish, dings, etc.) that will also affect valuation to a collector oriented to a "mint is best" frame of reference, while to a player it might be a whole 'nuther thing-

A worn guitar with worn frets/nut, a worn guitar with well-restored nut/frets, and a mint guitar with replaced frets are three different animals, and present three different valuation issues-
 

plusorminuszero

Strat-O-Master
Jan 20, 2012
632
chicago
vintage 1965 strat needs fret job and a new nut. Will this impact the value? Should the nut be replaced, shimmed, etc.?

Thanks.

There's a way to do the frets so that they look original. You must specify a luthier who understands the fret installment of the day~that is~Fender drove the frets in sideways from the beginning to '84. Don't waste your time with anyone who doesn't understand the need to have it restored in the least obtrusive way possible. Those frets should be driven out from the bass to the treble side, and new ones installed from the bass side, but there are some cosmetic concerns that should be addressed. Most likely, you won't find anyone to do a side fret job, but you can, and should, have the treble end tang narrowed, no matter how the frets are installed, such that they look exactly like the originals. Naturally, you should get the fret size exactly as the originals.

As for the nut....please. No one has ever made a nut at the factory that is really a good one. I routinely pull original nuts and sell them, because everyone goes gaga over them, never mind that the notches are huge, sloppy, too deep, or off center. A guitar needs a precision nut or it is just a pretty piece of wood.

Make sure you really need frets before pursuing a fret job. I think fret jobs are uncalled for, 90 per cent of the time. There is a small risk you will lose some value, so make it look good. Get your luthier to understand, make him understand that you understand. Take pictures of the treble side tangs. Compare these tangs to what they look like on a standard fret job: totally different.

As for replacing the nut...do you want to play it, or what? Generally, small improvements like a good nut are overlooked in the market.
 

stratluvr

Strat-O-Master
Dec 26, 2008
879
Fort Lauderdale FL
Devaluation from the value in its unplayable condition?(!)

Of course, value depends on the buyer- a guitar with nut and frets worn enough to cause playability issues will be likely to have other wear issues (finish, dings, etc.) that will also affect valuation to a collector oriented to a "mint is best" frame of reference, while to a player it might be a whole 'nuther thing-

A worn guitar with worn frets/nut, a worn guitar with well-restored nut/frets, and a mint guitar with replaced frets are three different animals, and present three different valuation issues-

Have to agree here!
 


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