String differences between brands?

Discussion in 'Tech-Talk' started by greezy strings, Nov 8, 2020.

  1. StummerJoe

    StummerJoe Senior Stratmaster

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    John Pearse and DR are probably the finest strings I have used. On my own guitars, I have been using EB regular slinky for at least 25 years. GHS makes nice strings. I have always had breakage problems with D'addario, but lots of folks love them.

    For a short period, maybe a year back in the very early 2,000's, I was using Dr. Ducks electric 10's with no real complaint. BONUS, they come with an extra high E string in every pack.

    Regardless of which brand I stretch them till they hold pith after extreme bends. And I'm sure like everyone else I get seriously annoyed if a string breaks during the stretching process, though luckily it is rare.
     
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  2. Handsome McClane

    Handsome McClane Senior Stratmaster Silver Member

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    Now that wouldn't surprise me a bit. I worked for Chevron Corp. in the '80s. Our Richmond refinery made most of the motor oil on the West Coast of the US, regardless of the brand on the can.
     
  3. 3bolt79

    3bolt79 Dr. Stratster

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    I still use D’Addario if that is all that is available. EB are my go to though. If I run out of EB I will go to the local mom and pop which sells Curt Mangan strings. I really like those, but they are more expensive. Usually I can get regular slinky’s really cheap. Like 2 bucks a set. And I like that the strings come individually packaged in paper envelopes. I hate the way D’Addario packages their strings, and try to avoid them. I also really like EB Cobalt strings, and I don’t mind paying a premium for those. They really make the bass strings sound nice and tight. No muddiness whatsoever.
     
  4. Handsome McClane

    Handsome McClane Senior Stratmaster Silver Member

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    Never gave it much thought, but I don't think I like it either. I always rip the plastic bag where it tells you which gauge is what color. And then you can't put them back easily if you need to, like you can with the envelopes.
     
  5. Dibbs

    Dibbs Senior Stratmaster

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    I'll use EBs, but they come off as a little sloppy. I prefer D'ADs.
     
  6. 3bolt79

    3bolt79 Dr. Stratster

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    Yeah my last order of a dozen EB slinky sets was 24 bux for a dozen sets.
     
  7. StummerJoe

    StummerJoe Senior Stratmaster

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    Good deal right there!
     
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  8. Handsome McClane

    Handsome McClane Senior Stratmaster Silver Member

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    I got the same thing last batch. Great deal. Still have about six sets left. I'm hoping to pick up another for Christmas.
     
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  9. jaxjaxon

    jaxjaxon Strat-O-Master

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    Here is how I stretch my strings sort of like this video
     
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  10. dirocyn

    dirocyn Most Honored Senior Member

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    It has changed. Ernie Ball used to get their strings from Fender (who used to get their strings from V.C. Squier Co.) and D'Addario, Martin, and Darco strings were all together. Nowadays it's easy to look up where strings are made, most of them are proud to tell you. String winding is not a huge industrial process, V.C. Squier started its string business with a modified Singer treadle sewing machine.

    It's possible the string winders occasionally get their materials from the same wire drawing factories. There are several hundred wire drawing factories in the U.S. alone, but many of them focus on copper or steel wire (electrical, industrial, and construction purposes). There aren't that many wire drawing companies that are already set up to do 80/20 or nickel plated steel or monel, and there's no reason to think any particular string company gets all its wire from one source.
     
  11. 98springer

    98springer Strat-Talker

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    Does anybody remember those strings that came in a straight hard plastic pack as long as the strings? They weren't coiled up, they were straight strings.The reasoning (marketing) was that coiling the strings could separate the winding on the wound strings! I think they were called "Strangs".
    At that time, I wouldn't have known if they were any good or not. I only changed a (as in one) string if it broke.

    Edit- Did some looking around and found these. Same era but not the ones I'm thinking of.
    https://www.guitar-list.com/news-st...first guitar,promote brilliance and long life.
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2020
  12. train

    train Worlds largest private army Silver Member

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    Mapes co. Supplies the bulk of wire for n.a. , Jim d’addario in a interview said there was only a few major string manufacturers and they including daddario make strings for many brands . Made to that brands specification . Daddario formly Darco. Strings. Makes it’s own wire plain in conn. Coated exp in mass. Or visa versa. And wind in ny. At over a mil a day. I wonder what the thru-put is for fmic. In Mexico.
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2020
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  13. s5tuart

    s5tuart Perfecting time travel since 2525

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    I find a big difference in strings. Not necessarily the sound but certainly the feel.
    I've been using Newtone strings for 30+ years but because they are very small batch makers they are not always available.
    I normally use 8's on everything but tried a set of Dunlop Billy Gibbons 7's on the Les Paul and they feel stiffer than my 8's by a big margin!
    Similarly with other brands purchased through necessity over the years. The worst I bought was a set of Dean Markley that felt like a rusty girder to me!
     
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  14. Stonetone

    Stonetone Most Honored Senior Member

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    :D:D:D Now that's funny :thumb:
     
  15. ToneRanger

    ToneRanger Most Honored Senior Member

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    I've experimented over the years with just about every brand on the market.
    The strings I've used the most over the years were GHS Nickel Rockers, which are pure nickel semi-flatwound - stiffer tension, they intonate better than roundwounds and they have more of the fundamental note with less overtones.

    I do, however, miss some of the edge and crunch of roundwounds, especially on my HB guitars, so I had been using Ernie Ball pure nickel 10's - I tried their standard nickel wound steel and found them a little rattley/buzzy with my setups, while the pure nickels didn't seem to have that issue.

    My latest purchase I bought some sets of Dunlop Rev. Willy strings in 10-46 to try on the guitars I'm using 10's on, plus I also got a deal on some Dunlop Heavy Core 10-48's - the Heavy Core seems like they might have the edge I like from roundwounds with the tension I like off the semi-flats.
     
  16. Fenderbaum

    Fenderbaum Strat-O-Master

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    Packaging is important. In terms of sealed packages. I once opened up a set of (Martin or something?) bronze strings to find they have corrosion spots on several places.

    I prefer EB´s way as well. In paper sleeves with sealed plastic bag. I hate all that plastic.

    Other than that, i don´t care much for brands. All NP-plated strings sound hunky dory to me.
     
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  17. Glyderslead

    Glyderslead Strat-Talker

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    Ahhhh. But are they long enough?

    Apart from the issue of the end wrap unravelling on EB’s, in one of the batches that I bought, when I got to the D & G strings on my Country Gent ...........they weren’t long enough!!!.

    Because of this I purchased a set of GHS Boomers. They are long enough, sound just fine and are quite long lasting.

    On my regular electrics I now use Elixir coated strings. No rust, sweat issues or unravelling of the ball end issues. All my guitars have 9 - 46 on them, which suit me.
     
  18. CAR63

    CAR63 Strat-Talker

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    Ha !! Same here !! :thumb:
     
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  19. jbylake

    jbylake Fabulously Famous Nobody Silver Member

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    I really like String Joy's and the D'adario NYXL's a very close second. The String Joys stay in tune, don't stretch or wear out as quickly as others so the price difference is really off set because I don't have to restring as often. I also think the SJ's and The NYXL's sound very noticeably better. But beauty is in the ears of the beholder. So I'll just leave it for here, for now.:whistling:
     
  20. PCollen

    PCollen Senior Stratmaster Silver Member

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    when strings are packaged coiled, the radius of the coiled strings(typically about 2 inches as the package is about 4 inches wide min.) is not tight enough to damage any wound string.
     
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