Suggestions for Strat cutting through the mix

Sugarcane

Senior Stratmaster
Nov 24, 2014
2,128
On the road
My advice: before you try anything else, raise the volume while soloing or riffing hard.

Do this either with a booster or, like I do, play rhythm with the guitar volume around 7-8 and roll it up to 10 while soloing or riffing. This might alter your tone too so try and see how you hear yourself.
 

Highway Chile

Strat-Talker
Apr 19, 2012
134
Maryland
Just skimming, it seems that most of good answers have been taken: EQ pedal, Tube Screamer, more treble at the amp, stay away from the "in-between" settings, diplomatically get others to turn it down, turn it up and let it rip ("turn everything up louder than everything else").
 

jvin248

Most Honored Senior Member
Jan 10, 2014
5,483
Michigan
.

Fuzz pedal. I've got an "Azor 303" that is a Big Muff Pi clone and it runs $20 on Amazon that does this. So you don't need to spend a lot.




And/Or get a Joyo American Sound. You can also plug the Joyo direct to a PA system and then you don't need to lug an amp. They run around $30.



.
 

Brian H

Senior Stratmaster
Feb 7, 2016
2,193
Delaware
Pull down frequencies on other instruments and at some point the guitar will pop out. Turning up and sometimes increasing guitar frequencies will just add to the noise.

Its trickier live unless youre going thru a mixer and into mains. But with two guitars it can be done along with a keyboard. And it benefits them all because they will be heard better also.

This can all go out the window with a drummer who doesnt understand dynamics and is constantly hitting or riding cymbals. :(
 

BuffaloHound

Senior Stratmaster
Sep 25, 2018
1,243
S
As others have said you gotta put on your glasses and look at the mix to find the empty sonic space. An EQ pedal is great but won’t do much if you don’t have a targeted frequency range.
If you don’t have the tools to do that than the standard answers are all you’re gonna get: turn up the volume, turn up the mids, turn down the OD/distortion, use a Blues Breaker, ect…
 

EC Strat

Senior Stratmaster
Gold Supporting Member
Dec 16, 2018
4,215
Louisville Kentucky
I use a wampler dB pedal that is pure clean volume boost whenever things get loud, my signal getting lost or I need to play a lead and cut thru a bit more I just step on it. Very useful little pedal
 

Guy Incognito

Senior Stratmaster
May 14, 2019
4,616
Here and now
Hey everyone! Curious for some thoughts here.

I've got a '62 AVRI Strat with CS Fat 50's Pickups. It's my absolutely favorite guitar to physically play but I find I lose it some in the mix with a band (Typical story with Strats, I'm well aware).

Anyone have any tried and true tips for cutting through the mix a little better? I find my Tele through the exact same rig does the trick, just trying to give my favorite Strat a little more gigging love.

Genre is typically pop/rock with drums/bass, keyboard, acoustic, and several vocalists.

My standard setup is:
Guitar => Wampler Ego Comp => Nobels ODR-1 => Verb and/or Delay => Fender Hot Rod Deluxe

I'm also vary well versed with an HX Stomp for modeled amp sounds so if there's a non-Fender amp that pairs well with a Strat I could at least experiment with a modeled version.
I'll start by saying I haven't read the other comments & I've never owned Fat 50's pickups.

Now that we have that out of the way I'm assuming Fat 50's are fatter/warmer than other Strat pickups & warmer usually equals more low frequencies. That puts your Strat in direct competition with the Bass Upper end frequencies. Warmer/Fatter guitars sound great on their own but tend to get run over in the mix. If your Tele has the typical Twang that's why it cuts through.

Likely you just need a little dial tweaking or an EQ pedal set up just for your Strat which highlights mid to high frequencies.

Of course, I'm no pro. It's just what I've noticed in my band.
 

Textele

Senior Stratmaster
Silver Member
Oct 10, 2009
4,905
Texas
Presence and midrange on your amp is where your cut resides.

I use Fat 50's and they cut really well. Every room and band is different though. We have a sax in one of the bands and I have to re-set my amp to almost a bit of harshness played alone, but sounds great in the mix.

Trim the gain too, the cleaner the better. Boost the upper mids on your pedals too. And VOLUME!
 

Bongo

Strat-O-Master
Feb 11, 2011
718
Seattle
sometimes its not about what can be done with the guitar to cut thru a mix...but what can be done to a mix to let it cut thru more. Remove or decrease frequencies where the guitar resides. If its a recording situation as opposed to live....on other instruments try pulling down some frequency ranges with an EQ and often you will suddenly hear the guitar better. It can be done live also but that can require getting other musicians to do it with their instruments which can be a pain :whistling:

Live....players dynamics can help also.

and right there's the answer.
Stack too many sounds in the same freqs on top of each other and you get mud.
Problem is getting the rest of the band to buy in and start listening to the mix as a whole and not just sit and pout about how "yer killin' mah tonz, dude".
 

Chipss36

Strat-O-Master
Oct 1, 2018
871
Texas
Absolutely the best way to have more cut in a mix?

buy the bass player a compressor and eq.

this is an area that page and John Pual were so very good at.

the two used notes that made up cords together, rather than a sonic mess.

only so much frequency response to go around. The kick competes with the bass. The bass competes with the guitar. And this is an area that takes the whole band working together to get right..

if you just get louder, the bass will do the same. And the problem will remain. And you both, will be more than likely, be overplaying the venue volume wise. And a venue will only support so much sound pressure level before it all goes south and sounds like cha cha…


I would work with the bass player on setting boundaries with frequency response. And working on dynamics as a band.

just my opinion
 
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PCollen

Senior Stratmaster
Silver Member
Feb 13, 2014
3,985
Florida
Hey everyone! Curious for some thoughts here.

I've got a '62 AVRI Strat with CS Fat 50's Pickups. It's my absolutely favorite guitar to physically play but I find I lose it some in the mix with a band (Typical story with Strats, I'm well aware).

Anyone have any tried and true tips for cutting through the mix a little better? I find my Tele through the exact same rig does the trick, just trying to give my favorite Strat a little more gigging love.

Genre is typically pop/rock with drums/bass, keyboard, acoustic, and several vocalists.

My standard setup is:
Guitar => Wampler Ego Comp => Nobels ODR-1 => Verb and/or Delay => Fender Hot Rod Deluxe

I'm also vary well versed with an HX Stomp for modeled amp sounds so if there's a non-Fender amp that pairs well with a Strat I could at least experiment with a modeled version.

https://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/SparkBooster--tc-electronic-spark-booster-pedal
 

J-Mart

Senior Stratmaster
Jul 17, 2020
1,197
Tx
+1 on the EQ. take out some low mids and boost up 800 to 2k, but watch the amount of those 2k and 4k bands, they can make it sound pretty nasally and sharp. If your eq has a level control, it can also bump you up if placed in the loop.
 

train

Senior Stratmaster
Silver Member
Jan 22, 2015
1,068
Usa.
Work on the band dynamics, your greatest help will come from the band . Get an amp with plenty of headroom so you can boost your dbs. For your solos.
 

train

Senior Stratmaster
Silver Member
Jan 22, 2015
1,068
Usa.
Example.. metal guitar lives with bass and treble accentuated. Scooped mid. And with all the pedals , s,s, amps and hi gain guitars they still wash out fairly easily in a full blown convergence.
 

Riderock

Strat-Talker
May 27, 2020
216
Ontario
I think Ebidis nailed it .I hated the way our lead player 's tone sounded on it's own (he set his EQ very mid rangey) . He is a amazing player and always said "A guitar is a mid instrument , it needs to sound middy to cut though". When in the context of the band his tone sounded great and never had an issue cutting through regardless of the guitar or amp he used.
 


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