Warmoth.com darrenriley.com Amplified Parts Lollar Pickups

Warmoth.com darrenriley.com Amplified Parts Lollar Pickups Guitar Pickups

Warmoth.com darrenriley.com Amplified Parts Lollar Pickups Guitar Pickups

Join Strat-Talk Today

Theory - Probably a silly question, but...

Discussion in 'Tab & Music Forum' started by Malurkey, Oct 30, 2017.

  1. fezz parka

    fezz parka The Wiggler of Sticks Strat-Talk Supporter

    Then try this.

    The A major scale:
    A-B-C#-D-E-F#-G#
    1-2-3-4-5-6-7

    [​IMG]
     
    Omar likes this.

  2. Mansonienne

    Mansonienne Stratocrastinator Extraordinaire Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    53
    Dec 2, 2015
    Paris suburbs, France
    It's the intervals that matter. A major scale has the following intervals: tone, tone, semitone, tone, tone, tone, semitone. So, A, B, C#, D, E, F#, G#, A. Think of the keys on a piano: between B and C - and E and F - there is no black key, so only a semitone. So, depending on the scale, if you need a full tone (or step), you have to make the C a C sharp (and so on - in the key of A major you need an F# and G# as well to make the major scale tone pattern).
     
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2017

  3. Mansonienne

    Mansonienne Stratocrastinator Extraordinaire Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    53
    Dec 2, 2015
    Paris suburbs, France
    BTW I second the Brimmel's theory book recommendation.
     

  4. bchaffin72

    bchaffin72 Most Honored Senior Member Strat-Talk Supporter Vendor Member

    Age:
    45
    Oct 4, 2008
    Stratford,Ontario
    Yep. Which would also be a thing to keep in mind for anyone using mnemonics. In any other key but C, which has no sharps or flats, some of those words/letters will represent the sharps or flats of that key. Kind of one of those things you just have to remember to apply a mneonic properly.

    So, in the Big Cats Eat Fast, the Cats, for the key of A represents C#, not C.
     
    Mansonienne likes this.

  5. Omar

    Omar Most Inquisitive Junior Member Strat-Talk Supporter

    727
    Aug 9, 2017
    Marbella, Spain
    @fezz parka it looks like someone is going to join my class. I won’t feel lonely :D

    @Malurkey join the class. You can start from here

     
    Mansonienne likes this.

  6. Omar

    Omar Most Inquisitive Junior Member Strat-Talk Supporter

    727
    Aug 9, 2017
    Marbella, Spain
    The Circle of Fifths will help you too. Mind the finger writing ;)

    Here is A major scale as well as chord progression.

    I, ii, iii, IV, V, VI, vii•

    A, B, C#, D, E, F#, G#

    A, Bm, C#m, D, E, F#m, G#m diminished

    Major, minor, minor, major, major, minor, diminished

    F0322251-4FD6-434E-B102-9AAF9140BD39.jpeg
     
    Mansonienne likes this.

  7. Malurkey

    Malurkey Senior Stratmaster

    Dec 28, 2016
    Netherlands

    OK, that’s new. Why is that?

    I can see that it works, I just don’t understand why it works...
     

  8. Omar

    Omar Most Inquisitive Junior Member Strat-Talk Supporter

    727
    Aug 9, 2017
    Marbella, Spain
    This is the formula of Major scale. The intervals in the key. You start with the key and end with key’s octave or not.

    C => whole step = D
    D => whole step => E
    E => half step => F
    F => whole step => G
    G => whole step => A
    A => whole step => B
    B => half step => C (octave)

    Edit: in your case A, B, C#, D, E, F#, G#, A

    There is only half step between B & C and E & F. You’ll notice it on the fretboard. When play E, next fret is F. Same applies to B and C.
     

  9. Malurkey

    Malurkey Senior Stratmaster

    Dec 28, 2016
    Netherlands
    Right! My counting was off because I was using the wrong rule. ‘Big Cats Eat Fast’ only works like that in the key of C.

    The actual rule is 2 tones, 1 semitone, 3 tones, 1 semitone for major chords.

    Thanks guys!
     
    Mansonienne likes this.

  10. Malurkey

    Malurkey Senior Stratmaster

    Dec 28, 2016
    Netherlands
    Hey! That works!
     
    s5tuart and fezz parka like this.

  11. GitBox Newbie

    GitBox Newbie Strat-Talk Member

    73
    Dec 18, 2014
    NYC
    Going back to the original thoughts in the thread, why do we even call a 5 chord, or power chord, a chord anyway?

    A chord is built on intervals of thirds, major or minor, but a 5 chord has a fifth as it’s only interval. Also a chord is generally thought of as having at least three distinct notes, i.e., A,C#,E in an A Major chord. But an A5 chord only has and A and an E. Even when played with three notes, the root is played again an octave higher, A,E,A.

    Finally, are 5 Chords used anywhere but in guitar based pop music?
     

  12. fezz parka

    fezz parka The Wiggler of Sticks Strat-Talk Supporter

    2 note "chords" are dyads. Hopefully the bassist or keyboards are covering the thirds. :D
     
    JustABluesGuy, Mansonienne and Omar like this.

  13. Ebidis

    Ebidis Providing the world with flat bends since 1985 Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    51
    Nov 14, 2013
    Alabama
    Dyads are good for chunky rhythms. In my band the other guitar player tends to play mostly power chords, while I fill in the 3s, 7s, 9s, and such by playing triads over what he is doing. It works pretty well.
     
    JustABluesGuy, Omar and fezz parka like this.

  14. bchaffin72

    bchaffin72 Most Honored Senior Member Strat-Talk Supporter Vendor Member

    Age:
    45
    Oct 4, 2008
    Stratford,Ontario
    Because power dyad or "two-tone chunky thing" just doesn't sound as cool.............:D
     
    Ebidis likes this.

  15. bchaffin72

    bchaffin72 Most Honored Senior Member Strat-Talk Supporter Vendor Member

    Age:
    45
    Oct 4, 2008
    Stratford,Ontario
    Being that they are neither major nor minor, lacking that 3rd, they can have another use. Haven't worked with them much yet, but I have a book of scales that contains some non-Western scales(Asian, Indian, Middle Eastern, etc...), many that are neither minor nor major themselves. The suggestion for ones that don't have a major/minor tonality is to use them only over root-fifth dyads so that you don't have that major or minor 3rd clashing or trying to pull to a tonality they're not necessarily meant to have.
     

  16. fezz parka

    fezz parka The Wiggler of Sticks Strat-Talk Supporter


  17. suncrush

    suncrush Senior Stratmaster

    Mar 25, 2014
    Pittsburgh
    Sure. They're super common on Uillean pipes, where the drones are pitched in octaves.