Theory stuff

Discussion in 'Tab & Music Forum' started by Antstrat, Apr 10, 2021.

  1. Antstrat

    Antstrat Most Honored Senior Member

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    OK, I have started a few threads in the last year about theory and to be honest was blown away by the responses here and in PM's. I was reluctant to give it another spin because I failed miserably, life events and other things cluttering my pea size brain, and I felt I might have let some of you down (Catholic guilt is a curse, I even feel responsible for the Titanic sinking) It's just been a flat out strange year on so many levels.

    Onward:

    Decided wtf, fall down and get up and try again.

    So here's where I'm at: I know some chords, I know enough scales and licks to have a good time but want to go further before I'm too old to remember what it is I'm doing.

    I want to build my knowledge road one brick at a time, small bites that I can digest. Too much information and that spinning Twilight Zone image appears in my head.

    So just like you were talking to an 8 year old, what do you suggest to be the next logical step?

    Many thanks in advance.
     
  2. Dadocaster

    Dadocaster Dr. Stratster

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    Triads. It's an easy introduction to what intervals are used to make chords, will get you thinking intervals instead of fingers, get you thinking A B Csharp instead of fingers.

    I have Baptist guilt. It's just as bad and you can't drink.
     
  3. Bob the builder

    Bob the builder Most Honored Senior Member

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    I'm still struggling too but learn the scales.
    Knowing that alone will gives you the power to build chords.
    It's wierd but every now and then something's just gonna be a "oh yeah" thing for ya.
    Put it in your pocket
    Pretty soon you'll have enough in there.
     
  4. Parksie

    Parksie Strat-Talker

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    I've had a fairly good look over a lot of different teaching sites over the years and also subscribed and paid for some.

    The guy that has helped me the most with understanding theory is Pat David.

    A young Aussie guy who just has that nack for communicating the world of theory in a way you can understand.

    Have a look at what he offers. Hope this helps you.

    BTW its absolute free.

    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLAF52671BC71D0D1B
     
  5. 3bolt79

    3bolt79 Dr. Stratster

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    I am still building my roadmap, as far as connecting scale sequences and arpeggio’s across the board. I do this with experimenting with a dual digital delay. If you hit a wrong note, it will be so obvious. It’s also a fun way to practice.
     
  6. StummerJoe

    StummerJoe Senior Stratmaster

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    Theory is like math.
     
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  7. Stratafied

    Stratafied Most Honored Senior Member

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    Some of us might have had relatives on the Titanic... thanks for nothing!!
     
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  8. Stratafied

    Stratafied Most Honored Senior Member

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    Count my ass out !!
     
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  9. StummerJoe

    StummerJoe Senior Stratmaster

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    math-is-hard-zfcxxr.jpg
     
  10. jbylake

    jbylake Fabulously Famous Nobody Silver Member

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    More like Quantum Mechanics.:eek:
     
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  11. Stratafied

    Stratafied Most Honored Senior Member

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    I'm pretty comfortable with knowing all positions of major and minor scales up and down the neck . I know a few other scales, I can make music but mostly try learning my favorite artists songs. So I guess knowing theory isn’t a must for me.
     
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  12. Esg877

    Esg877 Strat-Talker

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    The first thing that comes to mind: do you know the fretboard inside out? If a random fret/string is pointed, can you say what's that note without even thinking?

    If not, this is your next logical step. It's boring and it's memorization, but it's necessary. You can only build upon all the foundations of theory if you know the fretboard. If you know where all your Gs are, you can jump there and play G mixolydian right away. But you need to memorize the mixolydian patterns too.

    Start there, take your time. The triads suggestion is very good too.

    Another misconception: "theory makes sense and you'll be able to figure it out on the fly once you 'get it'".

    No, you won't.

    Theory to be applied in practice needs a lot of memorization, both muscle memory and mind memory. You can, and will, 'get it', but to use it on the fly, in real time, you need to have all those notes, scales, arpeggios, modes, all memorized. It's too much for the mind to process in real time. At least this has been my XP... FWIW
     
  13. Cerb

    Cerb Anti conformist reformist

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    Hey Ant!

    My suggestion would be this. Learn the harmonized major and minor scales if you don't already know them. They are sometimes referred to as chord scales.

    Then pick a song and transcribe it. You'll notice that most of the time, the harmonized scale will help you figuring out the next chord, because you already know what it should be. Sometimes it doesn't add up and the chord you hear isn't in the key. Make a note of it and continue.

    When you have the time and energy, do a deep dive in why the out of scale chord(s) works.

    Theory applied to practice and then back to theory again.
     
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  14. marksound

    marksound Strat-O-Master

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    Or dance. :cool:
     
  15. Dadocaster

    Dadocaster Dr. Stratster

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    What's that?
     
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  16. Tone Deaf

    Tone Deaf Most Honored Senior Member

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  17. mikej89

    mikej89 Senior Stratmaster

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    Play along to songs in styles you like in order to develop your ear... Most guitar players aren't music theory experts lol. I'm a lazy hack guitar player but I can play serviceable lead to backing tracks in just about any style or key if I work at it (unless it demands classical playing or something o_O). As long as you know enough of the major scale or minor pentatonic, know the notes on the fretboard good enough to play at the right octaves, and can follow the changes good enough if needed you're pretty much golden.
     
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  18. Anacharsis

    Anacharsis Guitar Player Platinum Supporting Member

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    Begin with the end in mind. What is your goal? To write music yourself? To use theory as a tool to get better at figuring out existing songs, or to open up your improvisation in the context of known songs/chord progressions? I learned theory in order to improve my writing. As a result, I took a starkly different path than ones traditionally recommended to those operating in a musical execution (players of repertoire, from rock to jazz) context.

    I also think mostly about song structure in the context of pop/rock. So it's more important to me to understand how a song works (even if it doesn't follow theory "rules") than to nail down some of the more convention-enforcing aspects of theory.

    This kind of thing I find practical (never mind the clickbait-y title, which he does not believe):

     
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  19. fezz parka

    fezz parka fezz parka

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    Play a C major scale over a Cmaj7.

    CDEFGAB

    Now...play that same scale, except start on the 2nd note...the D. Play it over a Dm7.

    DEFGABC

    Now E. Over an Em7.

    EFGABCD

    Now F. Over a Fmaj7.

    FGABCDE

    Now G. Over a G7.

    GABCDEF

    Now A. Over Am7.

    ABCDEFG

    Now B. Over a Bm7b5.

    BCDEFGA.

    Note that the 1st, 3rd, 5th, and 7th note of each scale (mode) build the chord you're playing over.

    Let that sink in. :)
     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2021
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  20. Antstrat

    Antstrat Most Honored Senior Member

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    This is where I failed on the past,not asking when I wasn’t sure. Not gonna do that please have patience.

    Play a C Major scale over a Cmaj7. Not sure what that means.

    I understand according to the C Major scale pic below that the first note, C, starts on the third fret, A string.

    That about as much as I got.

    FCDD1043-A326-4B5D-A16F-E2BD467F4676.jpeg
     
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