Theory stuff

Discussion in 'Tab & Music Forum' started by Antstrat, Apr 10, 2021.

  1. of this world

    of this world Senior Stratmaster

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    same as before
    i use Howard Morgen's landmark octaves every dang day... nowhere near as intentionally as i once did though - nowadays they just pop up at the right moment like they have a mind of their own...
     
  2. of this world

    of this world Senior Stratmaster

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    https://truefire.com/jazz-guitar-lessons/fingerboard-breakthrough/c210

    Howard Morgen's Fingeroard breakthough...

    this true fire course:

    a) is like hanging out with a super cool old dude
    b) really delivers what it promises
    c) is worth ten times or more what it costs.
    d) all of the above


    that's right, the correct answer is 'd' - all of the above and more. it doesnt hurt that he reminds a lot of a very good friend.
     
    Last edited: May 8, 2021
  3. Namelyguitar

    Namelyguitar Most Honored Senior Member Silver Member

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    Books- not cheap, and they work! Theory on the web is like a deep rabbit hole.

    My books on theory, harmony, rhythm, exercises and other topics are very helpful!
     
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  4. Antstrat

    Antstrat Most Honored Senior Member

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    do you have a link to your books?
     
  5. fezz parka

    fezz parka fezz parka

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    The best lessons on making music with a guitar out there.
     
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  6. Scott Baxendale

    Scott Baxendale Senior Stratmaster Gold Supporting Member

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    I suggest a book by Ted Green called Chord Chemistry. In this book there are a couple of chapters that will change your life.

    First is chord formulas, then Fundamental Harmonies of scales, and last turnaround substitutions. Learning the simple chord formulas and how they relate the the major scale is a game changer. The Fundemental Harmony chapter teaches you all the modes from the major scale which gives you all the different melodic and harmonic sounds from the major scale and the turnaround substitutions gives you a vast array of different feels and sounds in a way that simplifies how much you have to memorize.

    I never could memorize a bunch of different extended chords but learning the formulas allows you to build any chord anywhere on the neck in a simple way.
     
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  7. Boubou

    Boubou Senior Stratmaster Silver Member

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    I did and understood quantum mechanics, but then I was a young man. As for theory........
     
  8. Baelzebub

    Baelzebub Most Honored Senior Member

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    I'm a big book fan, and I agree the net can be a rabbit hole, but I have finally put together a collection of sites and other web based material that I have up in it's own, always open, browser session, consisting of about 5 permanent tabs, one of which is a backing tracks site.

    The other tabs are whatever songs I might be working on at any given moment, or single videos by various people on specific aspects of theory that I might come along during my study that might shed further light on a particular thing, or provide an exercise for a specific component of theory, i.e, intervals.

    But mostly it's those 4 or 5 permanent tabs that provide structured, comprehensible theory and several different ways to visualize the concepts involved.

    It took some time to find the right tools, instructions and reference sites, but in a little over 4 weeks I've made more progress and feel alot more confident of theory than I ever did over my disorganized start and stop approaches over 50 years.
     
  9. spyglass

    spyglass Strat-O-Master

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    If anyone needs any books I have a few PDF'S.
     
  10. Bowmap

    Bowmap I nose a thang or two. Platinum Supporting Member

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    Thanks Monte, I have a Truefire account. They are extensive so that URL saves me a lot of digging.
     
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  11. cranky

    cranky Senior Stratmaster

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    For clarification: in order for it to be a proper "F major" scale, it should be a Bb rather than B. Raising the Bb to a B (aka a raised 4th) is what makes it "F lydian" which is the same scale as "C major" only starting a F rather than C.
     
  12. avri70

    avri70 Strat-O-Master

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  13. cranky

    cranky Senior Stratmaster

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    Basically yes, assuming you are playing a song that stays in the same key for it's entirety. (Many songs invoke a key change at some point, either for the chorus or as a sort of emotive device.)

    Just remember that, for any major scale, the root chords, IV chord and V chord will be major chords, while the ii, iii and vi chords will be minor. As an added bonus, the V chord (also known as the dominant) can always be played as V7 if you're liking that bluesy sound.

    Otherwise I'd say don't worry about major or dominant 7 chords yet. Focus on keeping track of your major and minor thirds. Which is easier than it might sound, because (disregarding the B string for now) the major third of any note is always one string down and one fret down, while a minor third is one string down and two frets down.

    Also, no matter if it's a major third or a minor third, the fifth is always the same. For this reason, as you progress, it'll be worth noting this general truth: the "interesting sounding" chords are so usually based on how far you deviate from the fifth. Like the 13 chords (aka 6 chords, but the 6 is an octave higher) in SRV's Lenny, they're very compelling. Whereas playing with the third -- making it major/minor, or swapping it out altogether for either a Sus2 or a Sus4, has a less dramatic effect on the chord and is often used in conjunction with the third (aka hammer on and pull offs), not instead of the third.
     
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  14. fezz parka

    fezz parka fezz parka

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    Duh. :)

    What makes it F Lydian is that it's the 4th degree of the parent scale of C major.;)

    While a major mode, F Lydian has nothing to do with the key of F major.
     
  15. fezz parka

    fezz parka fezz parka

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    For everyone:

    Modes...and chumpdom.​

    I've typed this a million times. Guess I have to do it again. :)

    In the key of C:
    C-D-E-F-G-A-B
    1-2-3-4-5-6-7

    The 1-3-5-7 = C-E-G-B. Cmaj7

    Now this is how the modes harmonize ( build chords):

    Take the first (1) degree, the third degree (3), the fifth degree (5) and the seventh degree (7):

    1-3-5-7 (modes are vertical)
    C-E-G-B = I Cmaj7
    D-F-A-C = ii Dm7
    E-G-B-D = iii Em7
    F-A-C-E = IV Fmaj7
    G-B-D-F = V G7
    A-C-E-G = vi Am7
    B-D-F-A = vii° Bm7b5

    So the above chord progression is built using the Ionian, Phrygian, Mixolydian and Locrian diatonic modes in the key center of C.

    The modes are the gateway to harmony. This is what you should know about the modes before you start using the modal scales that have a common root. Not a key center...the root or start of the scale.

    Example: The major degrees

    C Ionian = C-D-E-F-G-A-B
    C Lydian = C-D-E-F#-G-A-B ( 4th in G)
    C Mixolydian = C-D-E-F-G-A-Bb (5th in F)

    These are pretty safe when playing over a Cmaj7. Only on one scale (Mixolydian) are you missing a chord tone. Mixo has 3 of them. If you resolve to Bb... you'll be a chump.

    The minor modes are where the half steps separate being a hero from being a chump.

    C Dorian = C-D-Eb-F-G-A-Bb (2nd in Bb)
    C Phrygian = C-Db-Eb-F-G-Ab-Bb (3rd in Ab)
    C Aeolian = C-D-Eb-F-G-Ab-Bb (6th in Eb)

    Two chord tones for resolving to Cmaj7 in each mode. 5 chances for Chumpdom. 2 chances to be a hero.

    Now let's let the shizz hit the fan:

    C Locrian = C-Db-Eb-F-Gb-Ab-Bb (7th in Db)

    Six shots at Chumpdom. One shot at being a hero. ;)

    But...use the degrees in the right key centers...your possibilities increase to stay a hero. :D
     
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  16. cranky

    cranky Senior Stratmaster

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    Right. I was just adding that for the sake of the fella you were initially responding to. I'm close enough still to being a theory noob to know that I wouldn't have understood you as is, so I was just trying to help the guy.
     
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