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tips on recording drums with 2 mics

Discussion in 'Home Recording Studio' started by stratman in va, Nov 27, 2017.

  1. stratman in va

    stratman in va Most Honored Senior Member Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    48
    Jul 27, 2012
    Virginia
    Any tips on recording drums with 2 mics? I am going to help some friends by doing some recording with them, but will only have 2 or maybe 3 mics free to put on the drums.

    I have a CAD condenser mic and an SM57 - was figuring on using the condenser overhead and the 57 on the kick drum.
     

  2. Dadocaster

    Dadocaster Most Honored Senior Member Strat-Talk Supporter

    That will work. If you have another input and can round up another mic, 3 is very nice. Kick, snare, mono overhead gives you some control over relative levels of kick/snare.
     

  3. fezz parka

    fezz parka The Wiggler of Sticks Strat-Talk Supporter

    This will work fine. Overhead centered over the kick drum pointing down at the pedal about 40 inches from snare. 57 in front of the kick right at the shell.
     

  4. mad axe man

    mad axe man Senior Stratmaster

    Jul 23, 2016
    ontario canada
    the trick is a great compressor
     
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  5. stratman in va

    stratman in va Most Honored Senior Member Strat-Talk Supporter

    Age:
    48
    Jul 27, 2012
    Virginia
    Thanks for all the tips.
    I am a fan of Glynn Johns' work, but I am a novice at recording drums.

    I have a compressor on hand. It is the ART MP/C. The ART has worked pretty well on acoustic guitar, both with a mic and using a pickup. Would I compress the snare or the kick or both?
     

  6. Dadocaster

    Dadocaster Most Honored Senior Member Strat-Talk Supporter

    If you are doing 2 mic, I would just compress the snare. If you are doing 3 mic, with kick, snare, overhead compressing both kick and snare a little might help you out.

    You won't find out a lot of it until you start trying it. My kid hits so hard and has a thunderfoot so I have to use attenuators in front of the interface to get the levels down. An outboard compressor can take care of a lot of that for you.

    Even with rough guidelines to go by, you end up moving stuff around until it works.
     
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  7. fezz parka

    fezz parka The Wiggler of Sticks Strat-Talk Supporter

    I wouldn't use it at all . Compress after the fact in your DAW. The starved plate design is well...kinda meh sounding. If you do use it, use it as a pre with no compression. And use it on a dynamic or ribbon.
     
    Last edited: Nov 28, 2017
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  8. moullineaux

    moullineaux Strat-O-Master

    822
    Jul 11, 2009
    ATLANTA, GA
    Thoughts: I used to mic everything, all toms, two overs, kick and snare. Ran everything through outboard compressors and though I got good drum tracks they were never quite what I had in my head for the drum sounds. Discovered Glyn Johns method and WOW what a difference. The drums are open, full and resonant and nothing over powers anything. I make a slight tweak by using two condenser mics about 3-4’ high at 45 degrees to the kick, slightly behind the the drum kit. They point toward the middle of the kit. Over head I have two small condensers in XY formation about 7 feet above kit. Still mic the snare with a 57 and a Sure beta just inside the outside head. And here’s the kicker NO Compression going in. I control the volume and eq in my mixer before the DAW. All compression and sometimes slight eq is done inside the software. I won’t go back to the old method ever! As a drummer it’s great because you don’t have to worry about stray mic hits because there are no mics in the playing area. Highly recommend it.
     
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