Tips please....outdoor sound

Discussion in 'Amp Input - Normal or Bright' started by GuitLoop, Sep 13, 2020.

  1. ThebiggestJerk

    ThebiggestJerk Strat-O-Master

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    Best advice is to get someone to work sound during the gig. Have them sit close, middle and far away (ish) from the stage and then dial it in.
     
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  2. the dark sailor

    the dark sailor Senior Stratmaster

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    Agreed
     
  3. Buzzgrowl

    Buzzgrowl Strat-Talker

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    This is your problem.

    Then, regarding the PA, it needs to have sufficient subs. A pair of 1"+12" powered speakers won't cut it for a band with miced-up instruments.

    ... it actually also depends on the type of music you are playing.
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2020
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  4. charlie chitlin

    charlie chitlin Strat-O-Master Silver Member

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    If you're not mic'ed, you have no idea how your amp (or your band) sounds.
    I'm pretty sure that sound goes virtually straight up when outdoors.
    I use a different approach from Fezz.
    I use a 4x10 indoors to fill the space and, for outdoors I use a small amp right next to me on a chair pointed at my head. Keep the stage volume low and let the PA do the heavy lifting.
    If the OP isn't mic'ed, I assume he's not talking about a festival with a big stage, in which case, I would suggest a wireless for the guitar and going out into the audience area to check the sound.
    Even then, without pretty extensive PA, the sound is going to be very different depending on distance and angle/axis.
    I've always wanted to try a wireless mic placed out from the stage with an in-ear monitor to see how it sounds in the house. That would be cool outdoors, too, but all my outdoor gigs involve a soundman whom I totally trust.
     
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  5. dirocyn

    dirocyn Senior Stratmaster

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    That would be pretty cool in small venues. In a large space the delay would be distracting and has the potential to screw up your timing.
     
  6. charlie chitlin

    charlie chitlin Strat-O-Master Silver Member

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    Unless you play Rockabilly... :p
     
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  7. JB74

    JB74 Senior Stratmaster

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    Here's your answer. 220W into 16Ω
    IMG_9358.jpeg
     
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  8. 64 Tele

    64 Tele Strat-O-Master

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    When I was playing live, Deluxe Reverb(s) were my go to amp.
    Playing outdoors, we were always mic'd up, with a little bit of guitars/keys coming back thru vocal monitors.
    Unless it was a small area (like a backyard party), I would "think" that it would require being mic'd up.
    The Deluxe Reverb (outdoors) is a very directional amp. There would be a small area that you could hear yourself fairly well.
    Moving a foot in either direction, and you'd be "in the dark" soundwise.
    I would normally use a 2nd DR when playing an outdoor show and it would expand your area of being able to hear yourself.
    You might try using your 2nd amp (thru an A/B/Y pedal) to get a little more ability to hear yourself/project to audience.
    Ultimately, mic'd up is almost a requirement for playing outdoors.
     
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  9. JB74

    JB74 Senior Stratmaster

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    How we used to do gigs outdoors in Oz.
     
  10. dirocyn

    dirocyn Senior Stratmaster

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    Which by default means you're in a small venue... :p
     
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  11. David Garner

    David Garner Senior Stratmaster

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    You have to have power to project outdoors. You can get it from the amp or the PA. PA is easier.
     
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  12. dirocyn

    dirocyn Senior Stratmaster

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    IDK man, it's a little bit situational. It really depends on what kind of equipment and assistance you have available.

    If you have to bring a PA, mics, cables, an audio snake, mic stands, power amps, speakers, a mixing desk, floor monitors--that's a whole 'nother truckload of gear, in addition to the regular instruments & amps. A second vehicle to bring to gigs, a lot of gear to keep an eye on throughout--and a whole lot of work to set up and tear down. The band I was in back in the 90s went through this routine several times. It's a lot of work, and all that gear ain't cheap either.

    If that work is already done--or is done by somebody else--yeah, easier to just run it through the PA.

    If there is no PA, the easy way is to run vocals through a keyboard amp or a small powered mixer. I used to see 4 channel 200w mixers--those may not have the power or enough channels to mic up the guitars, depending of course how many vocalists you have. And they certainly can't help the bass player or drummer. If that's the kind of set-up that exists, carrying a bigger guitar amp and/or an extension cab is way easier than bringing a PA.
     
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