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Tremolo Stabilizers

Discussion in 'Guitar Owners Clubs' started by scarrpa, Sep 16, 2019.

  1. scarrpa

    scarrpa Strat-Talk Member

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    Hello World! I have played long enough to know that I love the strat in a floating configuration but always deck it because I can't do the county double stop bendy things. I have Teles but I prefer my Strat for what I do with my band.

    I just discovered the Göldo BackBox / ESP Arming Adjuster devices. I ended up buying a super cheap copy version of this thing off of Amazon to test it.

    I looked around online to find out more from a players opinion but it was mostly technical and installation instructions.

    Does anyone that has one installed on a 6 screw fender Strat bridge think it is the answer to having your bends sound in tune and not "sag" the stationary strings while bending? How is tremolo use effected? I'd like to hear your opinion. Thank you!
     
  2. CB91710

    CB91710 This is a Custom Title Gold Member Strat-Talk Supporter

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    Never heard of it, I looked at some of the available versions and it looks pretty wide... does it allow for pulling up as well as dropping pitch? Hard to tell but it doesn't look like it.
     
  3. fezz parka

    fezz parka Making a record.... Strat-Talk Supporter

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    I don't like the feel Tremsetters give. So for pedal steel bends on a floating Strat, I stabilize the bridge with the heel of my hand. It takes some practice but once it gets in your muscle memory, it's pretty seamless.
     
  4. misterwogan

    misterwogan Strat-O-Master

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    Apologies for not being able to answer your question - but I'm interested how you execute these "county double stop bendy things" as I've never done it before.
     
  5. dippah

    dippah Strat-Talk Member

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    I have a Göldo BackBox (the real thing) lying in a drawer with spare guitar parts. It went on my Strat, albeit a 2-point tremolo one, but considering how it works, 2-point vs 6-screw shouldn't be making any sort of difference. It stayed on my Strat for maybe 3 days.

    Let me first say, that yes, it genuinely lets you do those kinds of pedal-steel-like bends, and they stay in tune. However, I use the trem bar a whole lot more than I have a need for such bends, and the way it changes the behavior of the trem arm was a deal-breaker for me — the resistance it provides on pulling the arm up. Plus, the clicking noises really grated on my nerves.

    Also, it's quite finicky to set up, although, obviously, it can be done. But it was additional fiddling that I didn't really need on every string change.

    That having been said, while it didn't work for me, it could work for you. Everyone has a different playing style, and finds certain techniques more important than other ones.
     
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  6. scarrpa

    scarrpa Strat-Talk Member

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    I guess what I meant to say is when you fret a string(high E) with one finger while bending another up a whole step (B string) anywhere on the neck.
     
  7. scarrpa

    scarrpa Strat-Talk Member

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    From what I've read it does to a certain point. I throw it in there and update you all. Thanks for the input.
     
  8. misterwogan

    misterwogan Strat-O-Master

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    Ah, unison bend. Ok I'm good. I though you were bending both E and B strings for some "country thing".
     
  9. fezz parka

    fezz parka Making a record.... Strat-Talk Supporter

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    No.

    Pedal steel double stop bends. Gimme a minute and I'll put something up. On a floating Strat.
     
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2019
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  10. misterwogan

    misterwogan Strat-O-Master

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    Thank you, I'm intrigued...
     
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  11. fezz parka

    fezz parka Making a record.... Strat-Talk Supporter

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    While the unison bend can give you the same pitch problems on a floating bridge, I believe this is the type of bends (they can also be used in blues and rock) the OP was talking about.

    On a floating bridge Strat, no amp models, just direct in.

     
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2019
  12. misterwogan

    misterwogan Strat-O-Master

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    Thank you so much for doing this, it is exactly what I was looking for. I'm doing a country cover and I need to enhance the licks with this technique. But how does it differ from a unison bend? Which note is static and which is being bended? I think that this is something I need to see in notation or tab.
     
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  13. fezz parka

    fezz parka Making a record.... Strat-Talk Supporter

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    What does unison mean? Coincidence of pitch. The same note at the same octave played simultaneously.

    These are dyads. Harmony.

    The bends on the B and G string are what you get on a pedal steel or a guitar with a bender. :)
     
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  14. scarrpa

    scarrpa Strat-Talk Member

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    If I had to sum up my opinion of the whole tremolo stabilizer experience in one sentence I'd say "It adds function, but diminishes the stratocaster playing experiance for me."
    Dippah pretty much nailed it.

    I can certainly understand how it would be for some people the end all solution. It took like 10 minutes to install and then I tried messing around with it for an hour or two until I searched some videos and found out how to set it up properly.

    After I got the pedal steel double stop bends playing in tune I noticed the trem arm was incredibly stiff compared to the previous float set up I had following Frudua's method. I was able to shake chords still but to do so, the arm movement did feel restricted. You are not gonna go all Jeff Beck or Scott Henderson with this thing in your guitar like you could without it.

    Another thing that jumped right out to me was that my strat felt more taught like my teles. Anyone ever hear people talk about how their strat is all slinky and their tele is all hard to play even though they both have the same scale length and string gauge? I tried to figure that out the hard way. I think I stumbled on something.

    Maybe this is how it is supposed to be set up. Maybe it is not. I read somewhere that you just keep messing with it until it feels right. I'll mess with the spring tension and report back sometime.
     
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  15. DavidSchwab

    DavidSchwab New Member!

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    I play a Parker P-38 with a Wilkinson trem. I use three springs and 9-46 D’Addario NYXL strings. I keep the bridge floating. The guitar doesn’t have locking tuners.

    For a while a had a WD Music trem stabilizer, but I didn’t like the feel of it. I do pedal steel type bends all the time. I don’t have much of a problem with it throwing the other strings out of tune. And these NYXL strings stay in tune after dive bombs too.

    I think heavier gauge strings exhibit more of that problem since the tension on the springs is already higher. You look at someone like Albert Lee. He uses .008-.038 for that reason. The harder you have to push your strings up to a note, the more out of tune you are going to throw the rest of the strings.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  16. Seamus OReally

    Seamus OReally Senior Stratmaster Silver Member

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    I did not expect this to be the case, so there's no confirmation bias... but I found I could suddenly do pedal-steel type bends on my floating Strat without detuning the other strings after I installed a Callaham steel block on my Gotoh bridge. I don't know or even have a wild guess why that would be the case, but it was and is. "I don't ask questions, I just have fun," to quote Daffy Duck.
     
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  17. DavidSchwab

    DavidSchwab New Member!

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    If the block is heavier that kind of makes sense. The whole reason for the block is to stabilize the system so it doesn’t move without you pressing on the bar.

    Interestingly Leo called the block the “bar” and the thing you grab with your hand the “control handle.”

    “The bar 25 is relatively massive, preferably formed of solid material, and the tension springs 28 are preferably quite stiff, so that unless the control arm 34 is manually oscillated there is no tendency for the bar or springs 23 to vibrate when the strings are plucked. The mass of bar 25 and stiffness of springs 28 may, however, be maintained at a minimum because of the relatively close coupling of the bridge portions 22 and the fulcrum ridge 15. With this arrangement the entire bridge structure normally acts as a rigid member. Thus, no tremolo eflect occurs except at the will and direction of the player.”


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  18. scarrpa

    scarrpa Strat-Talk Member

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    Big blocks huh? That’s exciting. The fake arming adjuster had to go. I’m enjoying the 3 spring tremolo right now all commando. I can do the bends in tune by kinda pulling them both respectively slightly instead of anchoring down on the higher note.

    I found adapting my technique is way easier than fighting an instrument that doesn’t want to be played.

    It’s currently worth it. I might look at new springs and a big block although the big block forbids the trem arm to touch the pick guard due to the trem cavity size. It probably doesn’t matter much since the arm can only go so far anyway until it bends itself.

    So that is it from me! It was certainly a journey. Thank you for all the input!
     
  19. Nate D

    Nate D Most Honored Senior Member

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    yep, only Fezz can make three blind mice sound so good.
     
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  20. jvin248

    jvin248 Senior Stratmaster

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    Purpose of keeping the floating trem? I find I get distracted with whammy bar tricks. Then I get distracted figuring out why there is or isn't a tuning issue. So now I just block the trem. Eric Clapton approves so there is that.

    .
     
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