Truss rod "problem?" on Pro 2 Stratocaster

Discussion in 'Tech-Talk' started by Saberslash12345, Oct 17, 2021.

  1. Saberslash12345

    Saberslash12345 Strat-Talk Member

    Age:
    26
    Messages:
    21
    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2020
    Location:
    Croatia
    Hey guys, I have Pro 2 Strat, and I got myself some tools to do setup myself, so I also got notched ruler for checking neck relief. I first did setup on my Gibson Les Paul, which had too much relief(resulting in gap between ruler and neck wood in the middle of the neck), so by tightening truss rod I got my neck straight.

    Setting up Strat, I checked and it had too much relief also, so I tighten truss rod bit by bit with provided alen wrench, but It looks like I came to end of truss rod, I mean, maximum tightness. Can't go anymore, I feel resistance and I do not want to damage anything. Guitar is playable like this, neck has really small relief now which is how I like it, but I really wonder, shouldn't truss rod be able to straighten neck completely? It is bi-flex truss rod.

    I wonder what if in future my relief got bigger, but I can't adjust truss rod anymore since it is maxed out?

    All advices very welcome.
     
  2. Phiu-x

    Phiu-x Strat-Talk Member

    Messages:
    39
    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2020
    Location:
    Canada
    Your guitar has a bi-flex truss rod. I would try to find where is the neutral position before coming to the conclusion its "too far".
    Turn it the other way.

    Fender says this : Your guitar has a bi-flex truss rod. Tightening a Bi-Flex truss rod by turning the nut clockwise straightens concave neck curvature by bowing the neck backward. When turning the nut counterclockwise, however, you'll first run across a "neutral position" in which the mechanism isn't applying force in either direction, and then you will encounter renewed tightening as the rod pushes against a walnut dowel near the nut, bowing the neck bow forward and thus correcting convex or "humped" neck relief.

    source : https://www.fender.com/articles/tech-talk/what-is-a-bi-flex-truss-rod-and-how-does-it-work
     
    cranky and Nate D like this.
  3. Colnago1

    Colnago1 Senior Stratmaster

    Messages:
    1,344
    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2014
    Location:
    Where am I?
    Also, when performing truss rod adjustments it is best to do them in 1/4 increments and leave them to settle overnight. Sometimes the wood need to “catch up” to the adjustment and this takes a bit of time.
    Don’t do mass adjustments by turning the truss rod nut until you hit your desired relief as it will tend to be over adjusted in the following days.
    This has been learned through experience and the advice from fellow Strat-talk members.
     
  4. rake6978

    rake6978 Strat-Talker

    Messages:
    146
    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2021
    Location:
    Eagle Springs, NC
    Sometimes if a neck has been out of adjustment for a long time it takes a set in that position and needs a bit of extra assistance to get back where it should be. I've actually used a 2 foot aluminum level as a straight beam and a clamp type fret press to hold the neck in a slight back bow with the truss rod in the neutral position. Doesn't always work but it does more often than not. You slowly over time tighten the clamp just a wee bit at a time and let it sit for hours before doing it again.
    the wood needs to relax back into a straight and happy position.

    Here's the clamp

    jaws2.jpg
     
    Nate D likes this.
  5. Saberslash12345

    Saberslash12345 Strat-Talk Member

    Age:
    26
    Messages:
    21
    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2020
    Location:
    Croatia
    Truss rod is in max tightness position several days, and neck is still not perfectly straight (still has some relief to it) .. Its been like this 7-8 days..Strings on it are set of 9s.
     
  6. Guitarmageddon

    Guitarmageddon Dr. Stratster

    Age:
    45
    Messages:
    25,289
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2014
    Location:
    Canada
    You never want your neck 100% totally straight

    You need a bit of relief - at least like .005"
     
    Triple Jim and Caddy like this.
  7. s5tuart

    s5tuart Perfecting time travel since 2525

    Messages:
    15,579
    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2011
    Location:
    All over the place!
    I don't have an answer but will be watching this thread closely because I have a bass that is suffering from the same thing. Truss Rod at max tightness and still too much concave bow.
     
  8. Guitarmageddon

    Guitarmageddon Dr. Stratster

    Age:
    45
    Messages:
    25,289
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2014
    Location:
    Canada
    My advice for you in all honesty is to try two things

    #1 the lightest gauge of bass strings possible to try to bring the relief down

    #2 leaving the bass for a few days or weeks with no strings on it and the truss rod max tightened
     
    The_Whale, Thrup'ny Bit and s5tuart like this.
  9. s5tuart

    s5tuart Perfecting time travel since 2525

    Messages:
    15,579
    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2011
    Location:
    All over the place!
    Thanks Ryan.
    I do have the lightest strings on I could find.
    I'm using it for some rehearsals at the moment but I will take your advice about taking off the strings at the end of November. Good plan! Thank you.
     
    Thrup'ny Bit and Guitarmageddon like this.
  10. Guitarmageddon

    Guitarmageddon Dr. Stratster

    Age:
    45
    Messages:
    25,289
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2014
    Location:
    Canada
    You can also try putting the bass/neck in a more humid environment for a bit, if the neck is dry and you have a bit of fret sprout, it could make the channel for the truss rod a bit more swelled, and therefore require the truss rod less tight to get the same relief with a bit more humidity in the wood....
     
    Thrup'ny Bit and s5tuart like this.
  11. Thrup'ny Bit

    Thrup'ny Bit Grand Master Curmudgeon

    Messages:
    42,864
    Joined:
    May 21, 2010
    Location:
    Yorkshire
    Nut off, add washer(s), nut back on.

    While the nut is off you can lean on the neck a bit to help it in the right direction. ;)
     
  12. Thrup'ny Bit

    Thrup'ny Bit Grand Master Curmudgeon

    Messages:
    42,864
    Joined:
    May 21, 2010
    Location:
    Yorkshire
    We live in a permanently more humid environment Ryan. :D
     
    Nate D, Guitarmageddon and s5tuart like this.
  13. Saberslash12345

    Saberslash12345 Strat-Talk Member

    Age:
    26
    Messages:
    21
    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2020
    Location:
    Croatia
    I know and I agree, but what if my neck moves due to humity (or lack of the one), but I can't remove relief since my trussrod is maxed out? Or it should not move when truss rod is maxed out? :D
     
  14. Thrup'ny Bit

    Thrup'ny Bit Grand Master Curmudgeon

    Messages:
    42,864
    Joined:
    May 21, 2010
    Location:
    Yorkshire
    How old is the thing? Did you buy new?
     
  15. Axis29

    Axis29 Strat-O-Master

    Age:
    53
    Messages:
    830
    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2007
    Location:
    Beaumont. California
    This was my first thought.
     
  16. The_Whale

    The_Whale Strat-Talker

    Age:
    52
    Messages:
    432
    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2020
    Location:
    Gaithersburg, MD
    Another thing that might work;

    loosen the rod to slack, let it sit a few days,

    then tighten the rod to near the limit, let it sit a few days.

    repeat a few times.

    Sometimes you can get a larger range of adjustment after doing this.
     
  17. ThreeChordWonder

    ThreeChordWonder Senior Stratmaster

    Age:
    56
    Messages:
    1,732
    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2020
    Location:
    Cypress TX
    This.

    If you leave the truss rod slack for 3 or 4 days first, the neck will adopt its natural shape given the environment its in.

    IIRC its natural shape should be pretty much flat, certainly no appreciable back-bow (i.e. 12th fret high). If there is back- bow, you could try reverse bending. Support the two ends on chairs ot something like and hang 10 lbs or so (big bag of spuds) in the middle. Better would be two 5 lb weights strung at the quarter points. This creates a more uniform bending moment and spreads the load. If 5 lbs doesn't work try 10, but don't go crazy.
     
  18. Thrup'ny Bit

    Thrup'ny Bit Grand Master Curmudgeon

    Messages:
    42,864
    Joined:
    May 21, 2010
    Location:
    Yorkshire
    That depends entirely on the neck. I stored one for over 5 years with no nut on the truss rod and it never moved a bit. Neither did it move when I put it back on the guitar and strung it up again and played it for a week before I found the nut....
     
  19. kurher

    kurher Strat-O-Master

    Messages:
    510
    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2017
    Location:
    3rd Stone from the Sun
    It helps, especially on a bass, if you push the neck in the right direction when tightening the rod.
    It's a small steel tube so it needs help sometimes to keep the neck in the desired curvature.
    On a single (vintage style) rod, you can try loosening it then bend the neck and re-tighten.
    Here's an image of the procedure from a 1967 Fender service manual:
    KgTC5A.jpg
     
    The_Whale likes this.
  20. ThreeChordWonder

    ThreeChordWonder Senior Stratmaster

    Age:
    56
    Messages:
    1,732
    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2020
    Location:
    Cypress TX
    Did it occur to you that it was already in its natural shape?
    Did the environment change?