Walnut Body

Ian Ashdown

Strat-O-Master
Apr 16, 2019
800
San Clemente, CA
The plans for my Natural Walnut body Strat are coming together, the body should be here in a couple of weeks. I want to make the body with just a nice soft satin, almost natural, finish. I’m trying to decide between a light satin clear coat or an oiled finish.

I’d be interested to hear any thoughts of the two options, pro’s and con’s etc. Also does anyone have any suggestion for the oil to use for a natural, satin finish?

Thanks!

Ian
 

Dreamdancer

Senior Stratmaster
May 1, 2014
2,362
Greece
For a natural finish that is as less colored as possible i would use superglue or epoxy....not only they ll work great to fill the grain but they ll give you the sheen you are looking for either full on glossy or woody and almost satin like you want to not to mention that either of them would be more protective than any oil you might use....superglue is a tad harder to apply than epoxy but the results are the same...
 

JB74

Senior Stratmaster
Mar 22, 2018
4,096
ɹǝpunuʍop
Do you want to buff it, or leave it?

Would you like it to have a degree of moisture resistance or are you willing to risk an untreated slab?

Gum turpentine, boiled linseed oil and beeswax in a 2:1.5:1 ratio, warm up the beeswax, until the beeswax dissolves, then remove from heat, add the gum turpentine to linseed oil and stir in well, until it is suitably thin enough. add the melted beeswax and stir in thoroughly. You can also use paraffin wax, but it has to be a naturally white solid wax, not an unrefined wax. You want it the consistency of a really thin "watery syrup". If it's not thin enough, more gum turpentine. Depending on the climate, you may need to keep the linseed oil and gum turpentine at above room temperature 30-40ºC when you add the beeswax, if you are in the winter months.

Let the solutioncool.

apply to bare sanded surface, let soak in, reapply as soon as surface appears to have taken it in, and let dry overnight. You may even want a third coat before you let it dry a couple days and buff with a soft calico wheel.

Best part about natural finish like this is you can reapply anytime, and you can clean the instrument with mineral spirits / naptha etc and reapply for a perfect new coat.

It's good enough for outdoor furniture - including teak, and helps to keep the colour in harsh UV.

In fact it's good for any exposed raw timber that's outside or indoor furniture that you do not want to seal with varnish or shellac or urethanes.

It's very good for kitchen benches, as it is food safe and also naturally protective, and regular maintenance is a breeze.
 

crankmeister

Most Honored Senior Member
Jul 9, 2020
5,681
Republic of Gilead
Curious about your question, I found this thread over at tdpri: https://www.tdpri.com/threads/shellac-vs-tru-oil.465691/

And this article too: http://www.guitarify.com/2012/07/tru-oil-as-a-guitar-finish/

I checked specifically because I've refinished one guitar ever, where I used shellac over Candy Apple Red. I concur with the fella in that tdpri thread who said shellac is tricky to work with because of how fast it dries (gets sticky after about 10-15 seconds of application). But I really like the subdued, natural look it put over the CAR, and I think it would look great over oiled walnut too.

Seems like Tru Oil is easy enough and effective, it certainly suits the look you're going for. If it were me, I'd probably apply it to the neck and body but then shellac only the body. But maybe you'll like it fine with just Tru Oil.

Once shellac dries, it ain't sticky anymore. It's not quite satin, but it's not remotely sticky and would show the grain nicely while also protecting the wood. It doesn't make the guitar look like it's coated in a candy shell like other clear coats.

As an added bonus, shellac isn't even a chemical!
 

chrisbaker

New Member!
Mar 17, 2019
3
Grand Rapids, MI
Where did you order your body from? I'm working on a similar project, but have found that walnut bodies are not as easy to find as I expected. I like the options at Warmoth, but wonder what others there are.
Thanks.

The plans for my Natural Walnut body Strat are coming together, the body should be here in a couple of weeks. I want to make the body with just a nice soft satin, almost natural, finish. I’m trying to decide between a light satin clear coat or an oiled finish.

I’d be interested to hear any thoughts of the two options, pro’s and con’s etc. Also does anyone have any suggestion for the oil to use for a natural, satin finish?

Thanks!

Ian
 

Mike H

Strat-Talker
Gold Supporting Member
Mar 7, 2011
225
Collierville, TN
I'm curious about how much your Walnut Strat weighs. I had a friend who had a Walnut Strat that he claimed was previously owned by Steve Miller.
He sold it because it was just too heavy.
 

Triple Jim

Guy Who Likes to Play Guitar
Silver Member
Feb 27, 2018
8,160
North Carolina
I'm curious about how much your Walnut Strat weighs. I had a friend who had a Walnut Strat that he claimed was previously owned by Steve Miller.
He sold it because it was just too heavy.
I have a Strat-like guitar with a solid walnut body. It weights 8.75 lbs. Warmoth will make a walnut body that's chamberd to reduce weight if you want.

warmoth-usacg_strat.jpg
 


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