What are PRS S- and T-type guitars known for?

nadzab

Play Don't Worry
Silver Member
May 15, 2009
6,169
New England
The ones I've played all left me a little cold. Which means nothing. And I have no doubt that a competent player can play any style of music on a PRS effectively...they're used in almost all major genres, based on what I've seen.
 

Whitster

Strat-Talk Member
Aug 27, 2021
94
Seattle area
Sorry but I have to agree with @guitarface - don't obsess over trying to categorize a particular guitar model/guitar brand. You can play anything on anything; is it the best choice? Maybe, maybe not. But don't limit yourself.

At any rate - PRS has never made a T-style guitar. They never made a "pure" S-style until the Mayer Silver Sky - which is Mayer's "optimized" early-60s Strat. They have had other somewhat Stratty guitars over the decades, going back to the first EG series in the early 1990s. But they were putting more of their "spin" on it - 25" scale length necks on the EGs, for the most part not traditional Fender single coils (the first-series EGs did come with SSS and HSS configurations); decades later there was a set-neck EG with 3 single coils in the SE series. They have had the 305 - a set neck, carved top 3 proprietary single coils with a 25.5" scale neck, they had the DC3/NF3 with a 25.15" scale (DC3 had the 3 single coils and the NF3 had Narrowfield minibuckers and a few others along the way before the Silver Sky became a big hit.

But PRS was trying for a guitar that had elements of Gibsons and Fenders but had its own sound - so you can create what you want with them.

Im.not disagreeing with you about the 'pure' (its a bit subjective ) Strat style thing but the early 90's PRS EG'S are pretty pure strat - certainly moreso than later ones

SSS pickups, alder body, maple bolt on neck etc

I've played two and they are VERY Strat
 

abnormaltoy

Mouth draggin' knuckle breather
Apr 28, 2013
23,284
Tucson
They are known for being incredible quality guitars built by people who actually play guitars (Core models), and for making people insult them and their owners. Oh and the look pretty sweet too.

My current three PRS guitars.

I just want to clarify something for my own peace of mind...are you now, or have you ever been, a dentist or a stock broker?
 

abnormaltoy

Mouth draggin' knuckle breather
Apr 28, 2013
23,284
Tucson
First off, this is not to bash anyone's choice in guitars, but...

I have not played the entire PRS lineup. The PRS guitars I have played seem to be good quality, and well made. I just never got the warm and fuzzies about one.

There's another angle to the original post, at least in my mind. It sounds like another of the "can I play '80s music on a '50s strat", or something along those lines. You can play Metallica on a tuba. You can play Blue Oyster Cult on a zither. Certainly within the realm of electric guitar music, any music that you can play on one type of electric guitar, you can play on another type of electric guitar. I have heard really interesting, grindy overdriving sounds out of guitars with the gold foil pickups. The only thing holding most of us back...is us.


Have fun, play guitar.
 

henderman

Dr. Stratster
Dec 4, 2013
10,796
largo,fl
I think I might like PRS's better if they lost the carved and flame tops and over-the-top ornamentation. It's just too wound up. Les Paul did the carved maple cap for a reason. PRS did it to mimic.

Les Paul/Strat:

View attachment 508357

PRS:

View attachment 508356
the original prs "classic electric" model was a solid alder body with a bolt on rock maple neck/rosewood board with just a few options of solid paint coors and dot markers.

now they are fancy topped and i don't think you can get a plain one anymore.
 

crankmeister

Most Honored Senior Member
Jul 9, 2020
6,016
Republic of Gilead
First off, this is not to bash anyone's choice in guitars, but...

I have not played the entire PRS lineup. The PRS guitars I have played seem to be good quality, and well made. I just never got the warm and fuzzies about one.

There's another angle to the original post, at least in my mind. It sounds like another of the "can I play '80s music on a '50s strat", or something along those lines. You can play Metallica on a tuba. You can play Blue Oyster Cult on a zither. Certainly within the realm of electric guitar music, any music that you can play on one type of electric guitar, you can play on another type of electric guitar. I have heard really interesting, grindy overdriving sounds out of guitars with the gold foil pickups. The only thing holding most of us back...is us.


Have fun, play guitar.
 

jbylake

Fabulously Famous Nobody
Gold Supporting Member
Silver Member
Nov 25, 2019
2,361
Currently MIA
Screw it. Go to the store and play a few. Screw the Dentist/Stock broker thing too. They're just parroting what they've heard before. If PRS made them all in solid colors, without the flamed top folks would just be calling them bland and boring. I don't play metal, and with the pickups in mine I don't think it would do that great of a job for that, but It'll cover most genre's, depending on the model.
 

geetaruke

Strat-Talker
Jan 31, 2017
114
Here
The ones I've played all left me a little cold. Which means nothing. And I have no doubt that a competent player can play any style of music on a PRS effectively...they're used in almost all major genres, based on what I've seen.
Same with me. Something about the sound that doesn’t jive with me.

Saying that, I’ve owned 3. Two cheaper SE’s and one expensive CE. In terms of build quality and out of the box set etc, even the Indonesian models have been better than any USA fender or Gibson I’ve bought in the past…my whole life. But the sound isn’t my taste.
 

Guithartic

Senior Stratmaster
Jan 10, 2021
1,478
Jacksonville, FL
What is a t-type guitar?

When I hear PRS, I think of immaculately built guitars. But I also think of kinda over-the-top glam guitars. Not all of them, but many.

PRS pickups can leave me wanting, though. My one PRS now has Seth Lovers, and it's great.

I would also love to have an S2 Vela semi-hollow 22-fret satin neck.
Telecaster-type.
 

John C

Most Honored Senior Member
Silver Member
Jul 17, 2012
7,992
Kansas City
Im.not disagreeing with you about the 'pure' (its a bit subjective ) Strat style thing but the early 90's PRS EG'S are pretty pure strat - certainly moreso than later ones

SSS pickups, alder body, maple bolt on neck etc

I've played two and they are VERY Strat

Actually I meant to say "pure Strat copy" but left out a word.:oops::oops::oops::oops:

I agree; the first EGs were pretty Stratty compared to the Customs, Standards and CEs - I suppose I tend to take them a step back from that pure Strat formula because of the 25" scale length vs. 25.5" scale length. I forget now - I don't remember if the single coils were Fralins or Duncans on those. I'm 95% sure "domino" pickups from the 2nd generation EGs were Fralins.
 

jbylake

Fabulously Famous Nobody
Gold Supporting Member
Silver Member
Nov 25, 2019
2,361
Currently MIA
mostly, they are known for being way over priced, but Paul raps his knuckles on a piece of wood and people come running with their money in hand.
And please describe your personal experience with them, and I'm not talking strumming a G Chord in the music store. How about the necks, how do they play for you? I think they're one of the easiest playing guitars I've had the pleasure to own. Like the split coils features also. Fit and finish is immaculate, and just a great all around guitar to play. Natural sustain doesn't sound compressed in anyway, and it's very friendly with pedals.
 
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hrstrat57

Strat-Talker
Jun 11, 2016
277
RI
I had a CE22 with the rotary switch and tremolo. It was cable of producing pretty much any electric guitar noises possible. Truly a versatile instrument. Sadly the neck profile was very weird - the only neck ever I just couldn’t dial in, very strange and frustrating.
 


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