What is it about Clapton?

Discussion in 'Sidewinders Bar & Grille' started by Lester H, Jun 22, 2018.

  1. Jimi Lightning

    Jimi Lightning Most Honored Senior Member

    Messages:
    6,286
    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2016
    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    @Strat Jacket .... Bingo . Thank you as the video made it clear. That is the tone that I love on my LP amd Marshall.:)
    I just cant get it on the Strat......
    See now it makes sense as I never attributed that to him.I am going to have to dig out those old records and re listen. I alwys found them thin sounding but they deserve another listen at this point.

    I most likely won't progress past BB and Cream era though.
    I just finished listening to a 70s record and it wasnt to my taste. Well done, absolutely but just not my style..

    Thanks!!!
     
    abnormaltoy, Strat Jacket and duzie like this.
  2. dante1963

    dante1963 Senior Stratmaster Silver Member

    Age:
    58
    Messages:
    1,853
    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2016
    Location:
    St. Louis
    Many people don't get past the BB and Cream years. Which I totally get. He really did change his tone after that and where he went wasn't to everyone's liking. Again, that's the taste thing. I really like the 70's Strat years, myself. The Core. Cocaine, and everything off of Layla And Assorted Love Songs. I've heard many people say they were turned on to guitar by Clapton's processed 80's tone--and that sound is really not high on my particular list, but that's just me.

    It's just that there is so much vitriol about the man that it sort of boggles my mind. The funny thing, is I didn't really start to get him until I hit my 50's. Before then, I totally wrote him off as a talented dilettante.

    Now, I realize how much I wasn't hearing.

    Some people hate him because he played a lot of other blues players licks. So did SRV. So did Chuck Berry. (T-Bone Walker, anyone?) So did...well, pretty much every blues player alive today. It's a language.

    And some people can't stand him because of some of his darker, sordid past, and some, extremely unfortunate and appalling drunken statements he made. The man wasn't a saint. I'd be willing to bet he'd be the first one to tell people that.

    But neither was Chuck Berry. I'm from St. Louis. We put a statue up of Chuck Berry. That man was an a***hole. But he was OUR a***hole and without him, we'd probably all be playing in polka bands right now. Sometimes it's hard to separate the art from the artist. Picasso was a wife beater. Hemingway was a misogynist, anti-semite. Lindbergh was a **** sympathizer. Do you separate the work from the creator? Sometimes it's tough, and other times it's impossible. My house is a Nugent-Free Zone. No Nugent. Ever. Because he is a raging, tumbling, tumbling dickweed.

    But if we are talking pioneer guitar tone....Les Paul cranked all the way up into a dimed Marshall? That, we have to thank Eric Clapton for. Warts and all.
     
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2018
  3. Monkeyboy

    Monkeyboy Dr. Stratster

    Messages:
    14,188
    Joined:
    May 23, 2015
    Location:
    I might as well be from another planet
    Who knew that about Uncle Jed, right ? :thumb:
     
    abnormaltoy and Bcorig like this.
  4. Bcorig

    Bcorig Senior Stratmaster Gold Supporting Member

    Age:
    71
    Messages:
    1,637
    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2018
    Location:
    Chino Hills CA
    Monkeyboy and abnormaltoy like this.
  5. Bcorig

    Bcorig Senior Stratmaster Gold Supporting Member

    Age:
    71
    Messages:
    1,637
    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2018
    Location:
    Chino Hills CA
    Yes. This is Strat Talk, not The Hollywood Reporter.
     
    dante1963 likes this.
  6. dante1963

    dante1963 Senior Stratmaster Silver Member

    Age:
    58
    Messages:
    1,853
    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2016
    Location:
    St. Louis
    Oh, I should mention (and please don't think this is a shot, it's not meant to be, it's just for clarification, not meant to be insulting or anything, it's just that this seems to come up a lot), but that story about Hendrix saying Rory Gallagher was the world's greatest guitar player? He never said it. It's one of those funny Internet myths. Occasionally it's changed to him saying it about Peter Green. And occasionally some other guitar player. But it's the same story, and he didn't say that either.

    I'm not sure who Hendrix thought the best guitar player was. Of if he even had an opinion on the matter. From what little I've read about him, I get the feeling Hendrix gave more thought to aliens from space than his guitar playing competition. It seems like Hendrix was a very, very odd fellow. But there were definitely guys he was known to respect. And Clapton was definitely up there.
     
    abnormaltoy and Strat Jacket like this.
  7. RaySachs

    RaySachs Senior Stratmaster Gold Supporting Member

    Age:
    62
    Messages:
    1,734
    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2017
    Location:
    Philly area
    You really ought to spend some time with Derek and the Dominos, at least, maybe Blind Faith. But Layla has a lot of his greatest songwriting on it and the guitar interplay between he and Duane is just mind-bendingly good. Duane is kind of the guitar star of that album, but he also pushed EC to some real high points as well. If you spend some time with that and don't like it, by all means blow off the rest of the '70s, but that's pretty astounding stuff and you shouldn't write it off without spending some time with it...

    -Ray
     
  8. guitarface

    guitarface Most Honored Senior Member

    Messages:
    8,288
    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2012
    Location:
    New Jersey
    Do you mean explain the statement that he was a pioneer?

    Well, I'm a huge fan, and I don't think he was all that much of a pioneer. He'll be the first to tell you that he played blues he heard from black American musicians. But if there's something pioneering about bringing that to a new audience, popularizing it and then subsequently working it into other forms (like cream songs that are not blues per se) then that's pioneering. There also may be something vaguely pioneering about bringing a certain level of blues guitar virtuosity to the pop music of the day. The Beatles were known for vocals and songs. The stones for songs. If however, you liked mid 60's popular music with blazing guitar solos, then Clapton was the pioneer, all respect to George and Keith. Goodbye Cream came out around the same time that Led Zeppelin I came out. So, if Led Zeppelin as a heavy English electric blues band with a wailing former yardbirds guitarist is a big deal, then ec and cream are pioneers.

    And then there's the issue of plugging a les Paul into a cranked Marshall. Pioneer on that front. The les Paul was stolen and he found the consistency of the marshalls to be less than that of fender twins.

    The thing with Eric is to hear his contemporaries talk about him- people from the 60's. They're in awe of his guitar playing.
     
    abnormaltoy and Strat Jacket like this.
  9. dante1963

    dante1963 Senior Stratmaster Silver Member

    Age:
    58
    Messages:
    1,853
    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2016
    Location:
    St. Louis
    That whole album amazes me. The interplay on "Key To The Highway" could be used as a doctoral thesis on blues guitar licks. And the whole album has this broken, desperate feel to it. I still think "Layla" is the greatest song ever written about being in love with another man's wife. and "Bell Bottom Blues?" That's the sound of a broken man if I've ever heard it. "Do you want to see me crawl across the floor to you?|Do you want to hear me beg you to take me back?" That's about as raw a love song as I've ever heard. And jesus, man, Duane Allman would probably be my pick for the greatest guitar player to ever live. How could anyone have been that talented and that young at the same time?
     
  10. RaySachs

    RaySachs Senior Stratmaster Gold Supporting Member

    Age:
    62
    Messages:
    1,734
    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2017
    Location:
    Philly area
    Yep, and Nobody Knows You When You're Down and Out could be the master class on blending major and minor pentatonic scales in blues playing. Just great stuff all around...

    -Ray
     
  11. nickmsmith

    nickmsmith Dr. Stratster

    Messages:
    13,391
    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2011
    Location:
    USA
    As a fairly recent father (past almost 4 years) "My Father's Eyes" always hits me to my core. Powerful song considering he didn't know his dad. Heard the song growing up but never really "got it" until recently.
     
    abnormaltoy likes this.
  12. Bcorig

    Bcorig Senior Stratmaster Gold Supporting Member

    Age:
    71
    Messages:
    1,637
    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2018
    Location:
    Chino Hills CA
    “Eric was a guitar player, Jimi was a force of Nature.”
     
    Monkeyboy and abnormaltoy like this.
  13. Folk_Hogan

    Folk_Hogan Senior Stratmaster

    Age:
    41
    Messages:
    1,972
    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2016
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    “vids” or it didn’t happen.
     
    abnormaltoy likes this.
  14. Bcorig

    Bcorig Senior Stratmaster Gold Supporting Member

    Age:
    71
    Messages:
    1,637
    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2018
    Location:
    Chino Hills CA
    Absolutely. Don’t get me started. The “best” anything discussions usually don’t go anywhere.
    The exception is Layla and Other Love Songs is the best album ever made.
     
    abnormaltoy and Strat Jacket like this.
  15. RaySachs

    RaySachs Senior Stratmaster Gold Supporting Member

    Age:
    62
    Messages:
    1,734
    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2017
    Location:
    Philly area
    Well, maybe after Exile on Main Street... :) :) :)
     
    7yrs, vid1900 and dante1963 like this.
  16. Strat Jacket

    Strat Jacket Senior Stratmaster

    Messages:
    2,710
    Joined:
    May 11, 2018
    Location:
    Illinois
    By all means, DON'T overlook the "Layla" album or lump it in with Clapton's downslide. Every cut is a gem, even the ones I didn't like at first as a teen, and "Key To The Highway" is not even of this earth. Every blues riff ever invented is in that song and mastered at that. Clapton was one of the first to record off a dimed little 15W Champ and the tubes must have been so hot you could roast potatoes on them. The interplay between Clapton and Allman is almost telepathic at times and it was all caught live by Tom Dowd in the booth...and as you can hear from the fade in, he got to the booth late and missed the first part. They were just jamming and not recording, and the heartache and passion pouring out through that little Champ just rips my heart out.




    Oh, and I might mention...this is the album and the cut that made me determine I was gonna buy a Strat all those years ago.
     
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2018
  17. lunatic

    lunatic New Member!

    Age:
    59
    Messages:
    1
    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2018
    Location:
    Canada
    Hello fellow musician, i believe Eric Clapton's influence is his long knowledge of past blues heroes, he has done the homework, that's for sure. He's written many great moments in music "everness" i call it, moments that are imbedded in our music collective. He has done such basic songs like "Wonderful Tonight" that are simple but yet enormous. I personally love his "Rush" soundtrack. My God, the feeling in just a few notes, is massive in tone and touch. Many guitar players are legends in quality, but have never done anything that's barely worth remembering, yet "Slowhand" is in my mind he is super at any style or guitar he picks up. Some just have it, blessed to live their gifts to the masses. That to me, are the reasons. Thanks for topic.
     
    7yrs and Strat Jacket like this.
  18. ToneMan Guitar

    ToneMan Guitar ToneMan Guitar

    Age:
    71
    Messages:
    72
    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2010
    Location:
    Noblesville Indiana
    It's a lot of things but like the other person said it is truly art and subjective. Cream was the very first live concert I ever went to in 1968. So that is part of it but .....
    >His dedication to mastering the blues and sticking with the music that inspired him
    >How he survived thru all the ups and downs and is still here with us and playing
    >Still making good music at 70+ years
    >The fact his sound is truly his fingers. Not a lot of pedals other devices to change the sound
    >He influenced me enough to keep playing for over 50+ years and is why I do what I do today.

    I like many others like Hendrix, SRV, Mayer, Page and other genres but to me it all goes back to Clapton.
     
    Strat Jacket and dante1963 like this.
  19. abnormaltoy

    abnormaltoy Mouth draggin' knuckle breather

    Messages:
    22,469
    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2013
    Location:
    Tucson
    I don't know the exact timeline, but...post Cocaine and Sheriff, Clapton, to me came to the stage as a great song writer...not like the LA song factories of the 60's...but, rip his heart out and lay it on the table great. He lived his life in public, all the flaws, failings successes and warts. He shared all of that with us, in song
    I've always like his voice, but his singing improved in that same time...I have no idea why he deferred to JJ Cale...he, to me, was certainly the equal of Cale, and far more. Post Brownie and Blackie...I'm not a fan of his tone, but, he can still play the snot of out of a guitar...when he goes to his reward, we will lose a blues library of styles, songs and licks. I would jump at the chance to sit and play backup to him for an afternoon.




    But that myth was around before the net, by decades. The first one I heard was Billy Gibbons.
     
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2018
    dante1963 and Stormy Monday like this.
  20. Lester H

    Lester H Strat-Talker

    Age:
    48
    Messages:
    431
    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2018
    Location:
    Kansas
    I've heard the same of Billy Gibbons. Seems to me when Billy was in the Moving Sidewalks the opened for Jimi at one time. I've heard that 30 years ago. I've never heard Peter Green mentioned. Rory Gallagher I've heard in the last few years but I didn't follow him much.