When did the relic look become cool?

Discussion in 'Sidewinders Bar & Grille' started by mikej89, Jul 15, 2020.

  1. stevierayfan91

    stevierayfan91 DEEPLY SHY.

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    Hi, @mikej89 -Buddy

    Someday whrn funds allow me to, I want a medium relic olympic white nitro S-caster.

    I would likely have to go parts build as I dont have Fender Custom Shop $ amount due to medical ailments.

    However I think some finish places like MJT are better at doing nitro relic finishes /know how to offer degrees of wear.

    Oddly while I love Stevie's playing and heavily road gigged Strat. From his sweat
    For my project I would likely look/request more of a subtle relic finish with more of the nitro finish left.
     
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  2. Shaytan

    Shaytan Strat-Talker

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    The whole relic thing is quite a curious concept. Play the crap out of your guitar, all the nicks, dings and scratches will only bring its value down - yet people would be willing to pay extra for a brand-new guitar with someone doing that on purpose...

    It's pretty interesting some of you made the analogy with the trend of wear on clothing. My sister loves to rag old jeans, she cuts them off, shreds the sawn ends and even turns them into shorts and such. Last year I had her do that on an old pair of jeans of mine, that were already in that condition only good to wear while washing the car. Now they look pretty cool, at a store they charge twice the price for that...

    Also, I've recently bought a pair of Reebok classics for 70% off. I found out there's a special model meant to look old, basically both the leather and rubber sole are yellowed. On pics it does look cool, but I really didn't digged the looks of an identical Adidas shoe that I saw on display at the store. Sure enough, it was more expensive than the regular model. :shrug
     
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  3. Johnny Danger

    Johnny Danger Senior Stratmaster

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    Oh man, you guys are gonna LOVE the body I have coming back to me from MJT. :whistling:

    But I distinctly remember the 90's as being a huge shift toward worn/vintage everything. Furniture. People were buying decent tables from garage sale and purposely painting them with that crinkle finish paint. Cars. People were very much in concours restoration, but there was a big movement towards survivor original cars with patina. Cars in particular even went more in that direction with rat rods. I think the grunge movement did have a big effect, but in general it seemed like people were ready to move on from the "all that glitters is gold" lifestyle of the 80's.

    The most interesting thing to me about fake aged guitars is how much we see of them vs. real vintage beat guitars. It almost creates this idea sort of wear, especially for the neck. I went to Nashville just before everything shut down and played a few vintage strats there. I was surprised to find I couldn't stand the neck finish on most of them. Only one really had the nicely worn to the wood feel and appearance. The rest were still thick with nitro or in one case had severely checked nitro on the neck and the whole thing felt gummy.
     
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  4. jtoomuch

    jtoomuch Senior Stratmaster Silver Member

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    Impressive. Do you write ad copy for a living? No offense intended.
     
  5. Chont

    Chont Most Honored Senior Member

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    Weird...

    i was just about to comment with "Last Tuesday" and then saw your comment. Great minds think alike.
     
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  6. CadillacBob

    CadillacBob Strat-Talk Member Silver Member

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    Was not Keef

    “I saw Don Was at his studio on Mulholland Drive in LA when he was recording the Stones in the early 90s,” says Black, “And he said he was attending the Grammys. Bonnie Raitt was nominated and he was her producer, and they were going to perform. He had a new bass and wanted to know if we could ‘beat up’ or distress the instrument so it wouldn’t look like new sneakers on the playground.”

    This flies in the face of a widely told apocryphal tale that Fender’s Relic Series was begun after Keith Richards tried a new Custom Shop guitar and liked it, but said he’d only play it if they “bashed it up a bit”. This is a total myth – one that has been thoroughly debunked by all parties involved in the founding of the Relic Series.

    Insert from the article in Guitar.com - THE UNTOLD STORY OF FENDER’S RELIC GUITARS
     
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  7. ToneRanger

    ToneRanger Most Honored Senior Member

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    The one idea I've seen recently that appeals is the "Relic Ready" - basically it is a NOS guitar design to break in and wear quickly, so whatever wear and tear shows up is your wear and tear, but it also doesn't take you 30 years to get there.
     
  8. wayoutjohn

    wayoutjohn Strat-Talker

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    I also agree with what you agree...
     
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  9. hexnut

    hexnut Strat-O-Master

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    Why would I want to buy a brand new guitar that looks like a piece of crap? Not going to happen.
     
  10. PBO Blues

    PBO Blues Strat-Talker

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    A timely thread. Bought my first relic-finished guitar just a week ago. Did not buy it because it was a relic, bought it because I loved its feel and sound. Knew the minute I picked it up that it was for me. That doesn't happen often.

    In truth, I'd have preferred that it hadn't been quite so artificially aged (though I think it was done pretty well). But what do you buy a guitar for anyway? Feel and sound. And I suppose that bypassing the agony of that first nick has some value too.

    Besides, I don't need a relic job to identify me as a poser. My playing alone does that quite nicely. ;)
     
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2020
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  11. Belexes

    Belexes Strat-O-Master

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    Oh, I am not insecure. Maybe you are because my opinion is different than yours? I think it is just fine that others like them. I do not and I would never intentionally relic a guitar to make it look old and used up. The rest of you can do what you want.

    Dissenting opinions is not a sign of insecurity. I hate them and I hate fake. I am pretty comfortable in my own skin to say that. I am sure there are things you don't like, but maybe not the courage to say it? :p

    Anything fake is posing as something else. A intentionally relic'd guitar is posing as a guitar that has had many years of constant playing. How is it you don't understand this? A fake relic guitar is posing as a a guitar that has seen many years of contant use, therefore a poseur. I know what the dictionary says and I know it is term given to a person.

    It is funny you feel the need to correct me for my use of the word. Does it bother you? I am sure most of us here use words for stuff not defined in a dictionary.

    I didn't demean anyone. How convenient that you only quoted one part of my post to take it out of context. What else did I say in my post? Did you read that far? Let me help you.

    "I will never buy something new that looks beat up. I hate fake.

    Furniture, Jeans and guitars...I want them new and if any wear is gonna happen, I am the one that is gonna do it with honest use. Guitars that show fake use are poser guitars.

    I will add however, that is my view and people who like fake wear on a guitar are entitled to their view as well."

    Sorry AlexJCRandell, you will have to practice your amateur psychology on some other poor soul. :D

    I never called one person a poseur, look at my post again... read it better.

    It is just fine to me that others like them for various reasons. Doesn't mean I have to like them. I never stated that people who like them are poseurs.

    It is ok for me to dislike something. It is ok for you to like something I dislike. Go sip on some of that Bundy, it will all be ok. :p
     
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2020
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  12. BlurgyWurgyWibble

    BlurgyWurgyWibble Strat-O-Master

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    Sincerely it became cool when it was no longer achievable. Much like everything else thats considered cool by the youth of whatever-day ..
     
  13. jtoomuch

    jtoomuch Senior Stratmaster Silver Member

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    But if someone spends big money on a CS relic, are they then careful with it?
     
  14. PBO Blues

    PBO Blues Strat-Talker

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    I suspect so. I would be. They just don't lose sleep over the first knock.
     
  15. Ted J

    Ted J Strat-Talker

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    Back in the sixties , a reliced guitar was a rareity, most people in the UK , if they could afford a Fender or similar took good care of them (with the odd exception)

    There was a music shop in Manchester called Renos and Jim Reno had a fiesta red Strat in the window . This was around 1966, as it had a rosewood board , it couldn't have been more than 6 years old and it was a wreck , the bridge was filthy , scratchplate really green, there were dings all over the body which were covered clumsily with red nail varnish and nicks in the headstock
    I used to go past that shop almost every Saturday and it was still for sale nearly a year later, nobody wanted a disgusting looking Stratocaster back then
    Incidentally , just over a bridge from there , the side of a building always carried a huge billboard advertising various things
    It was on this billboard Eric Stewart (Mindbenders and later 10cc) saw an airline add "Hi, I'm Cheryl, fly me " (can't remember the original name ), but it inspired him to write this

     
  16. Tsjackson

    Tsjackson Strat-O-Master

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    I’m not one to beat up a guitar, but I like what the 50’s and 60’s guitars look like after 60 years and therefor can’t say that I don’t like the look of relics.
    But I kind of don’t, but I do. kind of

    if I went into a guitar shop and played a beat up looking strat and it was beautiful to play I would buy it, not worried about if the wear done to it was genuine or by design.

    Although I’d also expect a beat up guitar to be cheaper than a shiny one which is rarely the case unless it IS actual honest play wear.
     
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2020
  17. CB91710

    CB91710 No GAS shortage here Double Platinum Supporting Member

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    It's not exactly that, it's just the general tone of an expressed opinion (and not pointing the finger at either you or Alex.)
    Certain topics... relics being one of them... tend to bring out some extremely strong opinions, and are specifically noted in the forum rules among other more obvious topics such as politics and religion.
    Discussions of controversial and sensitive topics is generally allowed only so long as the conversation remains civil, not personal, not condescending, and not insulting to those who might disagree with the poster.
    And sometimes it's a reaction/overreaction to a comment that goes over the top and ends up applying "thread lock" ;)
    Some topics just end up being a third rail.
     
  18. Stratbats

    Stratbats Senior Stratmaster

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    Well put.
     
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  19. dogletnoir

    dogletnoir V----V

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    Actually Rory Gallagher got there before SRV did.
    And the look of the Strat on the back of the Layla album kind of set the way a Strat should look for me permanently.
    "Well favoured...", i believe was the the term the man himself used.

    i m pretty good at putting wear and tear on my own instruments in any case (or rather, outside of any case, LOL).
     
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2020
  20. SAguitar

    SAguitar Senior Stratmaster Silver Member

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    My "relic" process on my No. 1 Les Paul Deluxe began in 1975 before I even got it. Someone pulled out the mini-humbuckers and literally chiseled out the cavities to install a pair of DiMarzio Super Distortion pups. And that install looked ugly! Still it screamed and rocked hard. I bought it from a bandmate for a few hundred dollars and then played the hell out of it for 30 years. By then Lester needed frets so bad that he moved into a closet for a long time. I finally found someone I could trust to level the fretboard and replace all the frets. Les looks pretty beat, with the finish worn down to the wood in many places, but he's earned every scar he bears.

    While Lester was living in my closet, I bought a used Les Paul from a friend on the other coast. The pictures were beautiful and it was (is) a Custom Shop model. We agreed on a price and he shipped it to me. After I got it I realized that it had a lot more nicks and player's marks on it than I was led to believe, so initially I was a bit disappointed. But it played and sounded so great that I came to love it. And then I realized that if it would have been pristine when I got it, I would have babied it and never really got to enjoy it. So now I have a Custom Shop LP that is a monster and I can play it as much as I want to!

    All this to say that I respect guitars that have been played a lot, and show it.
     
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