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Who changed electric guitar more drastically

Discussion in 'Sidewinders Bar & Grille' started by Ferpie, Sep 5, 2019.

Who changed electric guitar more drastically

  1. Muddy Waters

    6 vote(s)
    5.8%
  2. B.B. King

    1 vote(s)
    1.0%
  3. Eric Clapton

    2 vote(s)
    1.9%
  4. Jimi Hendrix

    58 vote(s)
    55.8%
  5. Duane Allman

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  6. Eddy Van Halen

    15 vote(s)
    14.4%
  7. Other

    22 vote(s)
    21.2%
  1. Yaralag

    Yaralag Senior Stratmaster Strat-Talk Supporter

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    He couldn’t get a case to keep it out of the rain? Not even a garbage bag?
     
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  2. ChaplainMike

    ChaplainMike Strat-Talker

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    That was awesome! Loved every second of it!
     
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  3. ChaplainMike

    ChaplainMike Strat-Talker

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    Based on my limited knowledge, I’d say three guitarists deserve this honor in the world of rock:
    Chuck Berry
    Hendrix
    EVH

    Everything else is footnotes
     
  4. Stratbats

    Stratbats Senior Stratmaster

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    But the Beatles no doubt sold more electric guitars than anyone...
     
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  5. freddairy

    freddairy Strat-Talk Member

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    None of the guys on that list compare to the following
    Les Paul and Chet Atkins got it going so to speak on a performer/innovator/licensing aspect and the Beatles made it popular among the american baby boomer teen and the pop up the garage band.

    Heck, Elvis did more for the electric guitar than most of the guys on that list historically/influence wise.
     
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  6. Stark

    Stark I’m still an idiot and I’m still in love Strat-Talk Supporter

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    Yes, I’ve had the privilege of plugging in with him a few times—last time was at Roguestock Santa Rosa. Mike’s playing is so good. He and Sven had all of the guitar stuff covered so I stopped playing guitar and started taking my trusty Casio beginners’ synth and EHX Lester K. I was able to go direct into the PA. It worked out so well that I decided to do more. I got myself a Hammond SK2 after that and I just love LOVE the sounds I can get. Mike and @Mansonienne/Andrea have been so supportive!
     
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  7. nungesser

    nungesser When I became of age my momma sat me down Strat-Talk Supporter

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  8. Ferpie

    Ferpie Strat-O-Master

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    The question isn’t really about who made it popular but more about who influenced the GUITARISTS the most.

    I agree Chet Atkins and Chuck Berry are big forgotten names on that list, Les Paul not so sure, I think his legacy ends up being more in the innovation than the guitar playing.

    HE WAS FANTASTIC but not memorable. IMHO
     
  9. AxemanVR

    AxemanVR I appreciate, therefore I am... Strat-Talk Supporter

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    I think it's fair to say that many great musicians fed off each other and improved exponentially as a result. That's entirely different than a single person having an epiphany and creating something truly unique outside the crowded field.

    I suppose you could say both Jimi Hendrix and Eddie Van Halen fall in the "epiphany" category, as guitarists go, but sheer ability without substance can fall short sometimes.

    Eddie didn't have nearly the singer/songwriter abilities of a Clapton or Hendrix (taking in account that they all played covers). Not that that's everything, but it sure does sweeten the deal...

    That said, I guess if I had to choose to play the most like any of the great guitarists mentioned in this thread I’d probably have to go with...

    Hold on...

    I’m thinking...


    `
     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2019
  10. fezz parka

    fezz parka Making a record.... Strat-Talk Supporter

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    A lot of us...er...older guys get it.

    Les was the second guitar hero. Charlie Christian was the first.

     
  11. jrbirdman

    jrbirdman Senior Stratmaster

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    I gotta go with Jimi, after I heard him I didn't play for weeks.
    I mean like, WOW, I didn't know you could get a guitar to do what he could do.
    I thought if that's the new direction I'm in trouble...
     
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  12. guitarface

    guitarface Most Honored Senior Member

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    Here’s two cents on all the people listed in the poll-

    Muddy waters- I love muddy, and he’s got his own guitar style, but no.

    Bb king- same sentiment as muddy.

    Clapton- an important figure, but too much of an imitator of the blues greats for him to win this.

    Hendrix- yeah, pretty awesome, but what he was doing wasn’t that much beyond what ec was doing in cream. Also borrowed a bunch from buddy guy.

    Duane all man- I love him, but no

    Evh- yeah, big change in style from what came before, but I’d he different enough from randy rhoades and some others to win this?

    I’ll throw out chuck berry and buddy guy as big time influencers.
     
  13. Stark

    Stark I’m still an idiot and I’m still in love Strat-Talk Supporter

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    Charlie Christian
    Jimi Hendrix
    Johnny Ramone

    I came out of punk rock but I learned about Jimi and Charlie Christian while I was ripping out the cowboy power chords. I may play like an idiot but I do know a thing or three....
     
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  14. freddairy

    freddairy Strat-Talk Member

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    It's all generational. Les was as big as Hendrix among aspiring guitarists of his day. He's pretty memorable to the older crowd. Hendrix's generation would be totally different without Les.
    Go watch "kids react to the Beatles" or anything from pop culture during the 60s and 70s. A name like Jimmy Page may be big around here but I'd bet more than half the millennials have no clue what a Jimmy Page is. I'm gonna guess 95 percent of them don't know who B.B King is either.

    I guess I'm interpreting the question as who kicked the ball furthest down the road.
    Wouldn't that be Elvis?
     
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  15. Sarnodude

    Sarnodude Senior Stratmaster

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    I once read a quote that stated that the history of electric guitar started with Muddy Waters, but it ended with Allan Holdsworth.
     
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  16. guitarface

    guitarface Most Honored Senior Member

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    If you’re in the neighborhood of Elvis, and the subject is electric guitar, then the correct answer is chuck berry.
     
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  17. duzie

    duzie Senior Stratmaster

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    Another vote here for Chuck Berry who influenced Keith Richards , Angus Young ,Ted Nugent and so many others !
    Consolation vote of Randy Rhoads over Evh :D
    More so for technique than guitar tone .
     
  18. Alan Crossley

    Alan Crossley Senior Stratmaster

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    Benjamin Franklin. He is famous for his experiments with electricity. Franklin's famous experiment in 1752 with the kite, key, and storm simply proved that lightning and tiny electric sparks were the same thing.

    It’s not commonly reported but Beni Franklin, as he was known in his local juke joint, had been known to tie one of his guitar strings onto the lightning conductor (his own investigation) mistakenly believing that the lightening would encourage the strings of his guitar to vibrate with greater resonance. Beni knew that resonance occurs when a system is able to store, and easily transfer energy, between two or more different storage modes - like the sound box on his guitar and the strings.

    Regrettably, Beni was unable to complete his design due to the fact that he fell out with his brother and went to live in London near England. He taught himself to swim and subsequently invented the first wooden flippers

    By 1726 Franklin was tiring of London. He considered becoming an itinerant teacher of swimming, but, when Thomas Denham, a Quaker merchant, offered him a clerkship in his store in Philadelphia with a prospect of fat commissions in the West Indian trade, he decided to return home. When he got home, he discovered that his wife had married again, her husband had left her after a very short time, so he had some children and decided to go live in France, where he lived happily for four years.

    Despite the fact that he never got around to finishing the worlds first electric guitar, Beni was not only the most famous American in the 18th century but also one of the most famous figures in the Western world of the 18th century; indeed, he is one of the most celebrated and influential Americans who has ever lived.

    Franklin was never elected president of the United States. However, he played an important role as one of eight Founding Fathers, helping draft the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution.

    He also served several roles in the government: He was elected to the Pennsylvania Assembly and appointed as the first postmaster general for the colonies as well as diplomat to France. He was a true polymath and entrepreneur, which is no doubt why he is often called the "First American."

    It was this selflessness that helped him impact the world and was, in my mind, the biggest influence “on the change of the guitar”.
     
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  19. amstratnut

    amstratnut Peace thru Music. Strat-Talk Supporter

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    Well, your singer/song writer abilities comment...EVH had DLR who is arguably a much better singer than Hendrix. I prefer Hendrix' songs but EVH came up with incredible parts for the VH songs, which many of are great, if not deep.
     
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  20. rocknrollrich

    rocknrollrich Senior Stratmaster

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    Absolutely.
    Evh was an excellent songwriter. He maybe didn't write lyrics, but the music was all Eddie. By the way, he's also a pretty dam good drummer as well. It kills me how one guy had so much talent. Guitar, bass, drums, an ok keyboard player.
     
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